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Montessori LOTE Part 1: Engaging the Child

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Does your languages program inspire greatness in your students? …

Does your languages program inspire greatness in your students?
Involving them in the great story of language and the evolution of global humanity is easier than you might expect.

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  • Montessori Education is a world-wide movement reflecting her global vision of a better world through education. \nWe have a new opportunity to realize that vision more fully by embracing the beautiful innovation of one of her contemporaries.\n
  • As Tim Seldin reminded us yesterday, Montessori was very clear about the importance of inspiring the child to engage.\nOne of the great stories is the Story of Language.\n
  • The story of language in dot points...\nWhat do you know of language impositions, deprivations and injustice?\n(If you aren’t sure what it means for a language to be designed for convenience, my second presentation explores that idea.)\n
  • All engaging stories have a painful crisis and a satisfying resolution!\n
  • The media offers vacuous heroes and antiheroes but we can, and do, a lot better.\nIt is a great gift to give a child the sense of being part of the solution.\n
  • in the great tradition of inspiring stories- this one has a lot going for it: starting with a boy’s vision of a better world through communication, going on to involve perseverence, devotion, resilience and becoming a part of humanity’s great story.\n
  • The creation and adoption of Esperanto is living, breathing proof that humans have it in them to do better than cede to force.\n(LOTE education frequently models the exact opposite- $ win)\n
  • The creation and adoption of Esperanto is living, breathing proof that humans have it in them to do better than cede to force.\n(LOTE education frequently models the exact opposite- $ win)\n
  • The creation and adoption of Esperanto is living, breathing proof that humans have it in them to do better than cede to force.\n(LOTE education frequently models the exact opposite- $ win)\n
  • The creation and adoption of Esperanto is living, breathing proof that humans have it in them to do better than cede to force.\n(LOTE education frequently models the exact opposite- $ win)\n
  • The fact that not everyone “gets it” yet, is actually an advantage in engaging young idealists. Choosing Esperanto, ahead of the pack, models acceptance based on reason and empathy, rather than mindless following, which is , itself, a very worthwhile lesson on bases for action.\n
  • In the next presentation, I’ll introduce you to some of the classes of children in dozens of really diverse countries who are learning Esperanto as their first foreign language.\n
  • Esperanto has been called a “linguistic handshake” because both participants step forward and extend a hand, on an equal basis. \n
  • This image expresses another analogy- Esperanto as a catalyst for intercultural communication. (A catalyst is a compound which speeds up a reaction)\nCertainly our world has enough global issues to talk about, and urgently. If we wouldn’t like to do it in Hungarian or Mandarin, is it fair to expect others, especially poorer others, to do it in English?\n
  • If not- we’ll go on to look at the implications for implementation.\n
  • You may wonder if this is too idealistic to be practical. I’d like to show you that it is not.\nWhile I was deputy at The Foothills School we conducted a review of our LOTE program\n which involved rethinking its purpose and exploring, with open minds, what various strategies could contribute to fulfillment of that purpose.\n
  • We thought through the questions with unusual seriousness and practicality in that we factored in the time available. (I don’t know why this is so rare!)\nWe made a list:\n
  • It is so important not to confuse English-language fluency with intelligence!\nFor students to properly experience the experience of having something to say and struggling to find the words to say it, they need to get further immersed in the learning (and using) process than is usually the case.\n\n
  • Bilingualism builds brains.\n100 hours of a 600-hour language does not make the same change in brain function that mastery and use of a 100-hour language does.\n
  • What does it mean to be a global citizen?\nOne foreign-culture friend is better than none. But a mixed dozen is better still.\nEsperanto provides the most cultural diversity in the least time.\n
  • Learning a second language illuminates your first.\nEspecially Esperanto because of transparent grammar: nouns ending in -o, regular tenses, constant affixes, that sort of thing. \n
  • Being bilingual is a big deal in Australia and in many other English-speaking countries. Early experience of success in anything inspires more investment.\n
  • A third language is easier to learn- whenever the need arises.\nIf we think about it, we know that we can’t predict which languages will matter for each child, over their life-span but we can equip them with transferable skills, general understandings about languages, learning techniques, thinking habits rich in analysis and synthesis, and confidence in both their ability to learn, and the need for other languages in the world.\n
  • After six years at Foothills I moved to Treetops Montessori and we set up an Esperanto program which thrived for many years, after a long series of disappointments in other LOTEs. \n
  • Primary children would not have time to learn (in school) a different LOTE, to the standard needed to do this.\n
  • On moving to NSW, I taught Esperanto in a state school for three years. The results were great again. Participation was voluntary, non-participants could go to another room and read or do homework. A couple of kids went for a week or two but they came back and joined in happily. Children with spelling issues enjoyed being able to spell and the academically gifted ones asked for extra homework so they could communicate faster and better with pen pals. The children went off to three local high schools where they learned German, Italian or French, all of them did much better than would be expected from the Candelo P.S feeder school.\n
  • What we were seeing at Candelo is an illustration of the latest thinking, that the best start is to choose a first language that children can learn thoroughly, and then transfer those skills to languages chosen when the child is old enough to make a choice.\n
  • It also provides a model of a relevant adult valuing language learning enough to engage in it.\n
  • Esperanto is easy enough to offer success to every teacher and child in primary school which means that LOTE no longer needs to interrupt the smooth functioning of the Montessori classroom.\n\n
  • “Talking to the Whole Wide World” comes with Montessori materials which are here to be explored and discussed.\n\n
  • \n
  • Transcript

    • 1. Montessori LOTE Part 1: Engaging the Child
    • 2. Engaging the Child• Not filling a bucket but lighting a flame• Lofty ideals• Heroes• ....A role for the child in the drama The Story of Language
    • 3. • Humans around the world created languages for their families and tribes.• Some languages became national, and international, by means that were not always honorable and kind.• Languages served unity and cooperation within the group but also contributed to xenophobia.• Esperanto is the language with no out-group. It is designed for the convenience of all the world’s people.
    • 4. • Humans around the world created languages for their families and tribes. Introduction• Some languages became national, and international, by means that were not always honorable and kind. Crisis/Climax• Languages served unity and cooperation within the group but also contributed to xenophobia.• Esperanto is the language with no out-group. It is designed for the convenience of all the world’s people. Resolution
    • 5. Heroes•Zamenhof designed a 2ndlanguage for all people.•I’m learning it to makefriends everywhere in theworld.
    • 6. Zamenhof’s Story is...
    • 7. about more than language satisfactory solution! anythingHow we respond to challenge
    • 8. about more than language satisfactory solution! anythingHow we respond to challenge
    • 9. about more than language Submissive Accept Anything Assertive Design a mutually satisfactory solution! Aggressive Impose anythingHow we respond to challenge
    • 10. about more than language Submissive Accept Anything Assertive Design a mutually satisfactory solution! Aggressive Impose anythingHow we respond to challenge
    • 11. about more than language Submissive Accept Anything Assertive Design a mutually satisfactory solution! Aggressive Impose anythingHow we respond to challenge
    • 12. Creating the Future
    • 13. The Foothills School 1994-1999
    • 14. Why teach LOTE?Why? How?
    • 15. Empathy
    • 16. Cognition
    • 17. Perspective
    • 18. Literacy
    • 19. Success
    • 20. Flexibility
    • 21. Treetops
    • 22. Outside a Swiss primary schoolduring an Esperanto LOTE interchange with Australian visiting students.
    • 23. Candelo P.S.
    • 24. Language Apprenticeship The 2-step process enables many more children to to “a universal apprenticeship master a target in learning how to learn language. languages” in primary school will allow students to“successfully transfer such skills to other languages” (Prof. Joe Lo Bianco, 2009)
    • 25. Immersion LOTE for allA first LOTE specificallychosen to be accessible forstudents offers the excitingpossibility of beingaccessible to their normalteachers too.This provides continuity,regular contact andopportunities for integrationand immersion.
    • 26. Montessori Everything 10% 20% 10%English ArtsScience HSIE 10%LOTE MathsHDPE Tech 20% 10% 10% 10% Even LOTE!
    • 27. Resources for Change These new materials enable teachers to Jen Mondeto Estas mond’ de rido Mond’ de larm’ Mond’ espera Mond’ de tim’ learn Esperanto Similas tion ni Ke bone sciu ni Ja mondeto estas ĝi Ja mondeto estas ĝi while teaching the ink! 1 Ja mondeto estas ĝi entire working e Esperanto alfabeto (alphabet) looks like this -> Ja mondeto estas ĝi Esperanto You can hear and practise the sounds at this site: Mondeteto Al la mondo ne mankas problemoj Pri klimato kaj mono kaj pli http://en.lernu.net/lernado/ekzercoj/ ash/alfabeto/ index.php Sed ni, la junuloj komprenas Nur eksistas unu lun’ Ke ĝi estos la mondo de ni What do you notice about the Esperanto alphabet compared to English? Kaj la ora sun’ Rekantaĵo: language to their Rido por ĉiu montras Ĉu ni riĉas 1. e Esperanto alphabet has _________ letters representing 28 sounds. Amikecon Amikoj Estas Niĉu ni ne riĉas, nu ja, jes ja aŭ 2. It follows the same ________________ as English. Ni devas dividi 3. ______ and ________ are missing. Kvankam montoj estas altaj 4. Extra letters with accents _________ the familiar ones they most resemble. Inter la tuta homar Kaj la maroj estas vastaj kaj vi Kune mi 5. e accent on ________ is upside down and rounded compared to the others. Por konservi la plantojn kaj bestojn Amikoj estas ni Ja mondeto estas ĝi Por vivi dumlonge en pac e proper names for ^ and ˘ are “circum ex” and “breve” classes.© Penelope Vos 2009 Vi kaj mi Por kunĝui etoson Ni devas kunstrebe koncerte www.mondeto.com but many people call them “hats” and “dips”. Pli kaj pli malaĉ e vowels look the same as in English and appear in the same order. 6. ey are:_________,__________,__________,___________,_________ Rekantaĵo Amikoj estas ni! but in Esperanto they are always pronounced as in the sentence : Kulturoj kaj lingvoj malsamas “Are there three or two?” Kompreno ja estas de How would you spell your name in Esperanto so people will read it correctly? Kune mi kaj ŝi... per Esperanto, ni pretas Sed, ___________________________ Kune mi kaj li..... eĉ pli kaj eĉ pli Eklerni 7. Knowing the alphabet is important © Penelope Vos 2009 www.mondeto.com so that you can use a _____________ __________ to nd the meanings of words. P. Vos 2010© Penelope Vos 2009 www.mondeto.com
    • 28. About the AuthorPenelope Vos (BSc Dip Ed) is a teacher, author and CEO ofMondeto Educational Resources.She is a graduate of Murdoch University and the Montessori World EducationInstitute, and has twenty years of teaching experience, in Science, Art and Esperanto,as well as general Montessori teaching at Treetops Montessori, in Darlington, WA.Her most recent books are "Australian LOTE: Achieving Broad and DeepCompetence in Languages at School" (2007) and "Talking to the Whole WideWorld" (2009), a stand-alone resource to equip primary school generalists to teach asecond language to fluency, in a context of global intercultural awareness, withoutprior training. Montessori shelf materials are available to further integrate LOTE intoMontessori classrooms. www.mondeto.com