Georgia Children’s  Book Awards   Previews &    Reviews   2012-2013                                Dr. Joel Taxel,        ...
2012-2013 Georgia Children’s Picture Storybook Committee           Members         Tracy Scaglione          Tanya Hudson  ...
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)     Except If    Jim Averbeck
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)  Dave the Potter:    Artist, Poet,       Slave.   Laban Carrick Hil...
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)    14 Cows for     America     Carmen Deedy illustrated by Thomas  ...
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)   Blue Chicken  Deborah Freedman
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)  Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11     Brian Floca
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4) Planting the Wild     Garden  Kathryn O. Galbraith  Illustrated by ...
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4) Emma’s Poem: The Voice of the Statue of Liberty       Linda Glaser ...
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)   Chicken Big    Keith Graves
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)     The Great Migration: Journey    to the North   Eloise Greenfiel...
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4) Perfect Square   Michael Hall
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)         Goal!     Mina Javaherbin illustrated by A.G. Ford
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)   These Hands  Margaret H. Mason  Illustrated by Floyd         Cooper
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)    Me…Jane  Patrick McDonnell
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)  When a Dragon    Moves In        Jodi Moore illustrated by Howard ...
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)     Clemente!     Willie Perdomo  illustrated by Bryan          Col...
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4) Thank you, Miss     Doover       Robin Pulverillustrated by Stephan...
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)  A Storm Called      Katrina     Myron Uhlberg  illustrated by Coli...
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)  Before John was    a Jazz Giant      Carole Boston       Weatherfo...
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)    Art & Max   David Wiesner
Picture Storybook Award Nominee           (Grades K-4)  Pecan Pie Baby Jacqueline Woodson illustrated by Sophie         Bl...
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Georgia Children's Picturebook Award nominees 2012-2013 created by Dr. Joel Taxel, Chair

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  • Averbeck, Jim. (2011). Except If . New York, NY: Atheneum Books for Young Readers. Simple text and illustrations lead the reader to assumptions on whether the egg is just an egg, except if it hatches to become something else… a baby bird? A baby snake? A baby lizard? Perhaps even a dinosaur that becomes a fossil? The story begins and ends with a blue egg hatching…but are they the same egg? Readers may be surprised at the conclusion!
  • Carrick Hill, Laban, illustrated by Collier, Bryan. (2010). Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave . New York, NY: Little Brown Books for Young Readers. This Coretta Scott King and Newbery Honor award winner is probably already in your collection, but deserves to be read aloud and book talked again this upcoming school year. Bryan Colliers’ layered illustrations with collage style techniques beautifully support the simple story of an African American potter during slavery. This biography tells the simple story of a potter, a unique trade for an African American at that time. Dave’s pots inscribed with poems give a glimpse into the mind of a man living during a trying time in history. A bibliography and notes from the author and illustrator give students a start towards more research about Dave the Potter.
  • Deedy, Carmen, illustrated Gonzalez, Thomas. (2009). 14 Cows for America . Atlanta, GA: Peachtree Publishers.   Nearly a year after the horrific events of 9/11, Kimeli returns to his Maasai home in Kenya to tell his people of the tragedy he saw while attending school in New York. His people listen in disbelief of buildings so tall they touch the sky, how those buildings came crashing down, and how dust and smoke blocked the sun and a great nation was injured. Fierce when necessary, the Maasai are also kind and generous towards those in need. Kimeli asks a blessing to give his sacred cow to America. The elders, feeling deeply for the injured nation want to do more. A U.S. diplomat arrives to a full Maasai ceremony with hundreds of Maasai in traditional costumes. To help America, they give their most sacred treasure…cows…fourteen cows. Beautiful illustrations and narrative combine to weave a true story together to bring home the final lines in the story: “Because there is no nation so powerful it cannot be wounded, nor a people so small they cannot offer mighty comfort.” Various imagery throughout the story will remind the observant reader of the Twin Towers.
  • Freedman, Deborah. (2011). Blue Chicken . New York, NY: Viking Juvenile. A mischievous chicken traipses through blue paint with its barn yard buddies in this delightful picture book by author and illustrator Deborah Freeman. Opportunities abound to connect with art instruction focusing on primary colors, shading, and perspective. Minimal text makes this book a great choice for younger students. Can the chicken undo all the blue by the end of the story? Read aloud with a group and find out.
  • Floca, Brian. (2009). Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 . New York, NY: Atheneum Books for Young Readers. For thousands of years, the Moon watched down on the Earth and people looked back in wonder. What was that bright light? Was it really made of cheese? The non-fiction book, “Moonshot” by Brian Floca pulls us into the early days of space exploration aboard the Apollo 11 from the countdown for lift-off to its rendezvous with the Moon in July 1969. Larger-than-standard text and large format cover and pages helps “Moonshot” illustrate the big dreams of the United States and the bravery of its astronauts who truly went where no man had gone before.
  • Galbraith, Kathryn O. , illustrated by Halperin, Wendy Anderson. (2011). Planting the Wild Garden . Atlanta, GA: Peachtree Publishers. This lushly illustrated picture book plays out the many ways seeds are planted to create a wild garden. There are a variety of connections to the science curriculum on the topics of seed to plant growth and the four seasons. Birds, wind, people, animals, rain, and the sun are just a few of the elements used to help create this beautiful wild garden. The use of onomatopoeia with the words “plip-plop,” “whishhh,” “snap” and “chomp, chomp” gives this book a chance to be a fun read aloud. This nationally star reviewed book is a perfect fit for schools that already have a garden program in place.
  • Glaser, Linda, illustrated by Nivola, Claire A. (2010). Emma’s Poem: The Voice of the Statue of Liberty . Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Books for Children. “ Give me your tired, your huddled masses yearning to be breathe free.” Who wrote these famous words and why? Linda Glaser’s Emma’s Poem details the history and inspiration about the poem which would one day be inscribed on the Statue of Liberty. In 1833 Emma Lazarus wrote “The New Colossus” the poem about the Statue of Liberty, when she was thirty-four years old. Her small sonnet written due to her concern about the enormous influx of immigrants and their poverty stricken situation would shape the hearts and minds of a whole nation. The poem forever declares that the Statue of Liberty and her torch stand as a welcome to immigrants and that the United States of America is a country that cares about those who come to our shores.
  • Graves, Keith. (2010). Chicken Big . San Francisco, CA: Chronicle Books. When a teeny tiny hen lays a humongous egg that hatches into a gigantic chicken, chaos ensues in the chicken coop as the chickens attempt to decide what to do about the newest addition to their community. They present a variety of theories and opinions about the big chicken, while he attempts to accept his own size and figure out how to belong. With simple, hilarious text, including dialogue between the discriminating group of normal-sized chickens and their oversized peer, Keith Graves presents a thoughtful twist on the classic “Chicken Little” fable. Chicken Big addresses topics with which all children can connect, such as accepting differences, finding where you belong, and making new friends.
  • Greenfield, Eloise, illustrated by Spivey Gilchrest, Jan. (2011). The Great Migration: Journey to the North . New York, NY: Amistad. Both Eloise Greenfield and Jan Spivey Gilchrist experienced The Great Migration firsthand as young children. In this collection of poems and collage artwork, they tell the story of thousands of families like their own, who, in the first half of the twentieth century, left their homes in the South for the opportunities and promise of life in the North. Author and illustrator present the facts and the feelings of this historical event in a way that is engaging and accessible to children. Greenfield depicts the complexity of emotions, from anticipation to fear to disappointment, felt by both children and adults as they left all that was familiar for a world that, quite often, did not live up to their high expectations.
  • Hall, Michael. (2011). Perfect Square . New York, NY: Greenwillow Books. The protagonist of this book by graphic designer Michael Hall is a square: bright red, four equal sides, four matching corners, perfectly happy. But on Monday, when it is turned orange, cut into pieces, and poked full of holes, it becomes a babbling, giggling, clapping fountain. Each day, the square transforms again with a new color and shape adventure. Perfect for read-aloud, this story will delight young readers with its mix of pattern and surprise, combining a structured progression through the days of the week and colors of the rainbow with the square’s exuberantly unpredictable transformations. And readers young and old alike will appreciate the tale’s optimistic message: change can bring joy in a world full of possibilities.
  • Javaherbin, Mina, illustrated by Ford, A.G. (2010). Goal! Somerville, MA: Candlewick Press. Set in a dusty village in South Africa, this simply narrated and beautifully illustrated book tells the story of a close-knit group of friends who brave the dangers of the street to enjoy an evening soccer game. The leader of the group has won a brand new, federation-sized soccer ball for being the best reader in his class at school. He and his friends begin their game, but when they are confronted by a band of bullies, the boys must find a way to hide their new and precious ball. Children will relate to the experience of dealing with bullies, as well as the universal experience of enjoying simple fun with one’s friends.
  • Mason, Margaret H., illustrated by Cooper, Floyd. (2011). These Hands . Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Books for Children. A grandfather lets his fingers do the walking down memory lane with his grandson in this beautifully illustrated book by Margaret Mason. The focus is on hands as the grandfather shares how his hands were not always allowed to bake bread at the Wonder Bread factory during the time of segregation. This story is a fresh perspective on the theme of civil rights, and will lend itself to read alouds and discussions. Floyd Cooper’s classic style of illustration with muted tones and soft lines is a great match to this reflective story that ends on a hopeful high note.
  • McDonnell, Patrick. (2011). Me...Jane . New York, NY: Little Brown Books for Young Readers.   Before she became a famous primatologist and anthropologist, Jane Goodall, the girl who would grow up to study chimpanzees in Africa, was developing skills she would use later in life. In adventures with her stuffed chimp named Jubilee, little Jane observed animals and nature around her home in England. Author and illustrator, Patrick McDonnell, gives us a glimpse into Jane Goodall’s childhood using simple text and illustrations created using Indian ink and watercolor, as well as, actual illustrations by little Jane and photographs of young and grown Jane.  
  • Moore, Jodi, illustrated by McWilliam, Howard. (2011). When a Dragon Moves In . Brooklyn, NY: Flashlight Press. If you’ve ever had an imaginary friend, you will understand the attachment the young boy has for his dragon in When a Dragon Moves In. After building the perfect sand castle, a young boy and his imaginary dragon enjoy the day frolicking in the waves, flying a kite, and roasting marshmallows. Unfortunately, no one believes him when he tries to share his new found friend with his family. This is when the mischief begins; the dragon throws sand at his little sister, eats all the sandwiches and blows air bubbles in the lemonade. Howard William’s vivid use of colorful illustrations and contrasting images make “ When a Dragon Moves In” really come to life.
  • Perdomo, Willie, illustrated by Collier, Bryan. (2010). Clemente! New York, NY: Henry Holt and Co. Narrated in first person by a boy named after Roberto Clemente, this picture book biography by Willie Perdomo combines lyrical text, seamlessly integrated facts and statistics about the Puerto Rican baseball great, and gorgeous illustrations from acclaimed artist Bryan Collier. The story is beautifully framed by the boy’s explanation of why he was named for Clemente; the back of the book includes a detailed timeline, touching personal notes from the author and illustrator, and a brief section suggesting additional books and web resources for readers eager to know more. Even non-baseball fans will be captivated by this fascinating, heartwarming story.
  • Pulver, Robin, illustrated by Sisson, Stephanie Ruth. (2010). Thank You, Miss Doover . New York, NY: Holiday House. Robin Pulver’s Thank You, Miss Doover is a delightful book in which the teacher tries teaching her class the proper steps in writing a rough draft for a thank you note and the importance of revision. Jack thinks writing the thank you note will be a cinch, but Miss Doover has other ideas. Jack writes Great Aunt Gertie thanking her for the boring stationary she sent him and the many uses it has; such as housebreaking Puddy, his new puppy. Miss Doover tries teaching Jack and the other students how to be specific with thoughts; considerate of the recipient’s feeling and that revising is searching for the right words to express how you feel. Sensing Miss Doover’s discouragement, Jack writes her a thank you telling her he just figured out why her name should be “Miss Do-over.”
  • Uhlberg, Myron, illustrated by Bootman, Colin. (2011). A Storm Called Katrina . Atlanta, GA: Peachtree Publishers. Drawing on real life situations and events, Myron Uhlberg writes a sensitive story of a young boy and his family trying to survive after Hurricane Katrina swept through New Orleans in 2005. Ten-year-old Louis grabs his cornet as the family escapes their flooding house, not realizing what an important part it would play in the following days. Louis and his family take shelter in the over-crowded Superdome as things go from bad to worse. When his father does not return from a mission to find food and water, Louis knows it is up to him to find his father with the help of his prized cornet. Through the detailed paintings of Colin Bootman the people and the city itself are brought to life in A Storm Called Katrina.
  • Weatherford, Carole Boston, illustrated by Quails, Sean. (2008). Before John was a Jazz Giant . New York, NY: Henry Holt and Co.   Carole Boston Weatherford transports readers to the childhood of saxophone legend John Coltrane, when his ears were open to the symphony of sounds around him: “hambones knocking in Grandma’s pots,” birds, trains, the tapping toes of dancer Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, the ukulele and piano played by his mother and father. Jazz fills each page as sparse poetic text dances through colorful, slightly abstract illustrations. A biographical note at the end provides more detailed information as well as additional resources. A perfect read-aloud introduction to this jazz giant’s life—especially with one of Coltrane’s albums playing while you read.
  • Wiesner, David. (2010). Art & Max . Boston, MA: Clarion Books.   David Wiesner begins this story in a simple way: Arthur, an artistically talented lizard, discourages his lizard pal, Max, from even attempting to create a piece of artwork. Max is determined that he, too, can be an artist, so he begins a portrait of Arthur. As Max persists in his efforts with a variety of artistic media, he draws Arthur into an adventure from which he may not emerge unscathed. With authentic dialogue and vivid pictures, Wiesner addresses themes of friendship, persistence, and acceptance of differences.
  • Woodson, Jacqueline, illustrated by Blackall, Sophie. (2010). Pecan Pie Baby . New York, NY: G.P. Putnam's Sons.   “ This didn’t used to be a mini -dress,” says Gia, trying on last year’s winter clothes. But her mother won’t give the too-small garment away, and Gia knows why: she’s saving it for “the ding-dang baby.” When Mama predicts that Gia’s new brother or sister will arrive by the first snow, Gia silently wishes for a winter with no snow. And when Mama tries to warm Gia up by telling her that the new baby loves pecan pie, just like Mama and Gia do, big sis just calls that baby a copycat. Gia’s friends, her family, and even her teacher try to talk to her about the new arrival in her family, but Gia’s jealousy and resentment continue to build until a climactic outburst at Thanksgiving dinner—and a confession from Mama that she will miss her time with Gia before “the ding-dang baby,” too.  
  • Picturebook awardnomineesppt2012 2013

    1. 1. Georgia Children’s Book Awards Previews & Reviews 2012-2013 Dr. Joel Taxel, Chair Picture Storybook Award (Grades K-4)
    2. 2. 2012-2013 Georgia Children’s Picture Storybook Committee Members Tracy Scaglione Tanya Hudson Sue Powers Tony Pope Colleen Giannotta Picture Storybook Award (Grades K-4)
    3. 3. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Except If Jim Averbeck
    4. 4. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet, Slave. Laban Carrick Hill illustrated by Bryan Collier
    5. 5. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) 14 Cows for America Carmen Deedy illustrated by Thomas Gonzalez
    6. 6. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Blue Chicken Deborah Freedman
    7. 7. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 Brian Floca
    8. 8. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Planting the Wild Garden Kathryn O. Galbraith Illustrated by Wendy Anderson Halperin
    9. 9. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Emma’s Poem: The Voice of the Statue of Liberty Linda Glaser illustrated by Claire A. Nivola
    10. 10. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Chicken Big Keith Graves
    11. 11. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) The Great Migration: Journey to the North Eloise Greenfield Illustrated by Jan Spivey Gilchrest
    12. 12. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Perfect Square Michael Hall
    13. 13. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Goal! Mina Javaherbin illustrated by A.G. Ford
    14. 14. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) These Hands Margaret H. Mason Illustrated by Floyd Cooper
    15. 15. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Me…Jane Patrick McDonnell
    16. 16. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) When a Dragon Moves In Jodi Moore illustrated by Howard McWilliam
    17. 17. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Clemente! Willie Perdomo illustrated by Bryan Collier
    18. 18. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Thank you, Miss Doover Robin Pulverillustrated by Stephanie Ruth Sisson
    19. 19. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) A Storm Called Katrina Myron Uhlberg illustrated by Colin Bootman
    20. 20. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Before John was a Jazz Giant Carole Boston Weatherford illustrated by Sean Quails
    21. 21. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Art & Max David Wiesner
    22. 22. Picture Storybook Award Nominee (Grades K-4) Pecan Pie Baby Jacqueline Woodson illustrated by Sophie Blackall

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