An eye on stress

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Self management is art of life. Stress is big menace of the day. It leads to miserable conditions and ultimately make life hell. This PPT talks about certain basic concepts of stress.

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An eye on stress

  1. 1. UNDERSTANDING STRESS ??? DR. PEEYUSH VERMA
  2. 2. LIFE AOUND US……………..
  3. 3. LIFE AOUND US……………..
  4. 4. LIFE AOUND US……………..
  5. 5. LIFE AOUND US……………..
  6. 6. LIFE AOUND US……………..
  7. 7. LIFE AOUND US……………..
  8. 8. LIFE AOUND US……………..
  9. 9. LIFE AOUND US……………..
  10. 10. … UNDERSTANDING STRESS
  11. 11. WHAT IS STRESS? Stress is your mind and body’s response or reaction to a real or imagined threat, event or change. The threat, event or change are commonly called stressors. Stressors can be internal (thoughts, beliefs, attitudes or external (loss, tragedy, change).
  12. 12. LEVELS OF STRESS
  13. 13. EUSTRESS Eustress or positive stress occurs when your level of stress is high enough to motivate you to move into action to get things accomplished.
  14. 14. DISTRESS Distress or negative stress occurs when your level of stress is either too high or too low and your body and/or mind begin to respond negatively to the stressors.
  15. 15. STAGES OF STRESS
  16. 16. ALARM STAGE As you begin to experience a stressful event or perceive something to be stressful psychological changes occur in your body. This experience or perception disrupts your body’s normal balance and immediately your body begins to respond to the stressor(s) as effectively as possible.
  17. 17. EXAMPLES Cardiac - increased heart rate Respiratory - increased respiration Skin - decreased temperature Hormonal - increased stimulation of adrenal genes which produce an adrenal rush.
  18. 18. RESISTANCE STAGE During this stage your body tries to cope or adapt to the stressors by beginning a process of repairing any damage the stressor has caused. Your friends, family or co-workers may notice changes in you before you do so it is important to examine their feedback to make sure you do not reach overload.
  19. 19. EXAMPLES Behavior indicators include: lack of enthusiasm for family, school, work or life in general, withdrawal, change in eating habits, insomnia, hypersomnia, anger, fatigue. Cognitive Indicators include: poor problem solving, confusion, nightmares, hypervigilance.
  20. 20. RESISTANCE STAGE MORE EXAMPLES Emotional indicators include: tearfulness fear anxiety panic guilt agitation depression overwhelmed.
  21. 21. EXHAUSTION STAGE During this stage the stressor is not being managed effectively and the body and mind are not able to repair the damage.
  22. 22. EXAMPLES chronic disorders, withdrawal, loss of enthusiasm loss of temper tension carried forward fidgety unwarranted rage, Life goes out of order.
  23. 23. COST OF BEING STRESSED DIRECT COST ILLNESS FASTER AGING HIGH COST OF LIVING LOSS OF PRODUCTIVITY DISABILITY/DEATH INDIRECT COST REDUCED CLARITY OF LIFE EVENTS REDUCED MORALE/INTELLECT REDUCED CREATIVITY/MEMORY REDUCED RESISTANCE/ SLOW METABOLISM LOSS OF ENERGY/TIME/ RESOURCES
  24. 24. COST OF STRESS TO THE ORGANISATION TOTAL COST OF STRESS TO THE ORGANISATION INCLUDE 19% OF ABSENTEEISM 40% OF TURNOVER 55% OF EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAMMES 30% OF SHORT-TERM DISABILITY & LONG TERM DISABILITY COST 10% OF DRUG PLAN COST TO COVER MEDICAL COST 60% TOTAL COST OF WORKPLACE ACCIDENTS 100% COST OF WORKER’S COMPENSATION & LAWSUITS
  25. 25. COPING STRATEGIES IT IS IMPORTANT TO UNDERSTAND STRESS. IT IS EQUALLY IMPORTANT TO UNDERSTAND, “WHAT IT CAN CAUSE TO ME” RATHER THAN WAITING TO WATCH “WHAT IT WILL CAUSE ME”. IT IS DIFFICULT “BUT NOT IMPOSSIBLE” TO COME OUT OF STRESS SYNDROME. NEVER IGNORE SLIGHTEST SYMPTOM OF STRESS, IT MAY BE AN “ALARM TO A BIG PROBLEM”. LEARN COPING STRATEGIES TO RESOLVE YOUR STRESS.

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