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Social Media in US
Higher Education
2013: Survey and Case Studies
Survey:
Hester Tinti-Kane, VP, Marketing and Social Medi...
Goal: Deeper look at faculty use of social
media
Fourth annual report – examining year-to-year changes in
unique types of ...
History of the Research

4
TYPES OF SOCIAL MEDIA USE

5
Personal Use

6
Majority of Faculty Now Use Social Media
Professionally

7
Use of Social Media in Teaching is Growing

8
PERSONAL USE

9
Use of All Sites is Growing

10
Younger Faculty Continue in the Lead

11
PROFESSIONAL USE

12
Growth in Professional Use is Across All Sites

13
Older Faculty are Catching Up

14
Growth Across All Disciplines

15
Many Faculty Participate in Virtual Communities

16
USE IN TEACHING (Not yet!)

17
Technology and the Teaching and
Learning Environment

18
Technological Promise
The interactive nature of online and mobile
technologies create better learning environments – 2013
...
Technological Concerns
Online and mobile technologies are more distracting
than helpful to students for academic work – 20...
Communications
Impact of Digital Communication on
Communication with Students

Increased

No Impact

Decreased

0%
21

10%...
USE IN TEACHING

22
Greater Teaching Use of All Sites

23
First Time: Youngest Faculty Not in the Lead

24
Discipline “Catch Up”

25
Social Media for Individual Assignments

26
Social Media for Group Assignments

27
Integrity and Privacy Remain Concerns

28
Privacy Issues

29
Social Media Case Studies
Study Team
•

Hester Tinti-Kane, Project Lead

•

Krista Jackman and Gillian Seely, Case Study W...
Social Media Case Studies
Objective
•

To identify faculty members whose use of social tools in the
teaching and learning ...
Social Media Case Studies
Implications of the research
•

Faculty were chosen to highlight the use of social media to achi...
Thank you! Connect with us…
Hester Tinti-Kane
@tintikane
Hester.Tinti-kane@pearson.com
Jeff Seaman
jseaman@seagullhaven.co...
2013 Social Media in Higher Education Survey Results
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2013 Social Media in Higher Education Survey Results

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The major findings from the 2013 Social Media Higher Education Survey jointly conducted by Pearson Learning Solutions & The Babson Survey Research Group.

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  • Unique research examines type of social media usage by a specific population
    The survey is addressed to a nationally representative sample of all higher education faculty who are teaching (defined as having at least one course code associated with them).
  • Faculty were asked about their social media use in three different areas: personal, professional (non-teaching), and teaching use.
  • Faculty Personal Use of Social Media – 2013
    Monthly +RarelyDo not use
    201370.3%13.6%16.1%
    201264.4%19.5%16.1%
  • Faculty Professional Use of Social Media – 2013
    UseDo not use
    201355%45%
    201244.7%55.3%
  • Faculty Teaching Use of Social Media – 2013
    UseDo not use
    201341.0%59.0%
    33.8%66.2%
  • Faculty were asked about their social media use in three different areas: personal, professional (non-teaching), and teaching use.
    Faculty are sophisticated consumers of social media. They match different sites to their varying personal, professional and teaching needs.
    Level of personal social media use among faculty (70.3%) mirrors that of the general population.*
    *Pew Internet Project says “72% of Online Adults are Social Networking Site Users” August 2013
    http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/social-networking-sites.aspx
  • Frequency of Faculty Personal Use of Social Media by Site – 2012 and 2013
    20122013
    Twitter7.9%10.5%
    Podcasts14.5%17.3%
    LinkedIn18.8%24.4%
    Blogs and Wikis20.3%24.9%
    Facebook52.5%57.0%
  • As was noted in last year’s report, there is a strong relationship between the age of the faculty members and the pattern of their social media use. Younger faculty continually lead older faculty in the proportion that make use of social media.
    This pattern is far stronger for personal use of social media, where older faculty are less likely to see the value. When the focus changes to professional use, however, the level of use by age is far more similar.
    Under 3535-4445-5455+
    Use social media - personal (at least monthly)86.6%80.2%73.4%63.0%
    Under 3535-4445-5455+
    Use social media - professional (at least monthly)63.6%62.7%58.7%49.2%
  • Majority (55%) use social media in a professional context (any aspect of their profession outside of teaching), up from 44% last year.
  • Frequency of Faculty Professional Use of Social Media by Site – 2012 and 2013
    20122013
    Twitter5.7%9.4%
    Podcasts11.0%14.3%
    Facebook18.5%23.4%
    Blogs and Wikis19.0%25.3%
    LinkedIn23.8%32.8% - 9pt increase!
  • Faculty Professional Use of Social Media by Age – 2012 and 2013
    Age20122013
    55+37.8%49.2%
    45-5446.1%58.7% - 12.6 pt increase!
    35-4452.5%62.7%
    Under 3555.7%63.6%
    Not just a digital native phenomenon, growing at faster rates in older faculty.
  • Faculty Professional Use of Social Media by Discipline – 2012 and 2013
    Discipline20122013
    Mathematics and Computer Science35.2%44.4%
    Natural Sciences36.2%51.1% - 15 pt increase!
    Social Sciences48.6%54.8%
    Humanities and Arts50.2%56.2%
    Professions and Applied Sciences47.6%60.2%
    Difference in timing of adoption among specific groups moving at slower rates. What will the future bring?
  • Slightly less than one-half of all teaching faculty report that they participate in virtual communities. The pattern by age is not as strong as observed for general social media use. The use of virtual communities around professional interests displays a different pattern than other social media use – with faculty at the youngest and oldest ages showing the lowest level of sue, and those from35 to 54 displaying greater participation.
    Under 3535-4445-5455+
    Virtual communities for your personal interests44.1%42.4%41.7%34.8%
    Under 3535-4445-5455+
    Virtual communities for your professional interests45.7%53.1%54.5%46.4%
  • Not a majority (41%), but steady year to year growth (up from 34% in 2012).
  • Before we dive into the specific findings of teaching with social media, let’s explore some of the preliminary questions we asked about the impact of technology on teaching and learning today.
  • The interactive nature of online and mobile technologies create better learning environments
    Strongly Disagree 7.7%
    Somewhat Disagree 33.1%
    Somewhat Agree 45.9%
    Strongly Agree 13.3%
    59.2% agree
  • Online and mobile technologies are more distracting than helpful to students for academic work
    Strongly Disagree 9.2%
    Somewhat Disagree 34.7%
    Somewhat Agree 41.2%
    Strongly Agree 14.8%
  • The Impact that Digital Communication Has Had on Your Communication with Students – Faculty
    DecreasedNo ImpactIncreased
    4.4%16.6%78.9%
  • Not a majority (41%), but steady year to year growth (up from 34% in 2012).
  • Frequency of Faculty Teaching Use of Social Media by Site – 2012 and 2013
    20122013
    Twitter2.7%4.1%
    Facebook7.6%8.4%
    LinkedIn4.5%11.1%
    Podcasts14.2%16.3%
    Blogs and Wikis21.6%26.9%
  • Faculty Teaching Use of Social Media by Age – 2012 and 2013
    Age20122013
    55+29.5%35.8%
    45-5434.1%45.4%
    35-4438.3%49.6% 11 pt increase!
    Under 3541.5%41.0%
    Why is the age difference different in this usage? Possibly career stage of middle aged faculty may be driving stronger use of social media. Experimental.
  • Faculty Teaching Use of Social Media by Discipline – 2012 and 2013
    Discipline Code20122013
    Mathematics and Computer Science26.7%34.7%
    Natural Sciences24.3%36.1% 12pt increase!
    Social Sciences36.8%40.0%
    Professions and Applied sciences37.3%43.0%
    Humanities and Arts39.7%45.8%
  • Use of Social Media by Type of Assignment and by Site – 2013
    FacebookLinkedInTwitterPodcastBlogs and Wiki
    Read, watch, listen16.5%6.6%8.7%57.5%58.6%
    Add comments16.0%5.3%7.5%25.4%72.8%
    Create11.9%4.6%7.4%23.2%81.5%
    Usage of social tools across the sites.
  • Use of Social Media by Type of Group Assignment and by Site – 2013
    FacebookLinkedInTwitterPodcastBlogs and Wiki
    Read, watch, listen19.4%5.6%7.7%39.9%65.4%
    Add comments17.9%4.7%7.2%21.2%75.8%
    Create13.6%4.5%7.0%22.3%82.5%
    Pattern is similar to individual assignment use.
    Creation is huge especially for blogs and wikis – interesting to see the active use of social tools instead of just passive media consumption. Frequency not depth of use. Sophistication of use, selective for certain levels of interactivity. Deeper than just specific sites for personal, professional and teaching, but sites within teaching for specific strategies.
    How does the social functionality impact learning? Some examples? Blog posts with an audience as opposed to one to one reading and reviewing by faculty.
  • Barriers to Faculty Use of Social Media – 2013
    Very ImportantImportant
    Lack of support at my institution15.2%20.6%
    Takes too much time to learn or use16.2%25.2%
    Lack of integration with LMS19.4%25.9%
    Inability to measure effectiveness20.0%32.4%
    Grading and assessment26.9%30.8%
    Separate course and personal accounts36.8%21.8%
    Concerns about privacy38.8%23.9%
    Integrity of student submissions43.9%28.5%
    Stronger views on top 3 – Very important vs important. Consistent, but growth is still strong for teaching use. Could be stronger and faster with some of the barriers/risks lowered.
    Sophistication of use, acknowledged risks, but rewards too.
    Risk to reward relationship? Are any of these barriers holding you back? Why? Has anyone overcome these barriers? How?
  • Privacy Concerns for Faculty Use of Social Media in Teaching – 2013
    Total
    Strongly AgreeSomewhat Agree
    Risks to the personal privacy of faculty34.6%48.9%
    Risks to the personal privacy of students36.0%50.6%
    Others outside of class should not be able to view class-related content61.1%25.3%
    Others outside of class should not be able to view class discussions66.3%23.1%
    Others outside of class should not be able to participate in class discussions71.3%20.0%
    Deeper in to this concern:
    Concerns about privacy, both for themselves and for their students, and about maintaining the class as a private space for free and open discussion, remain a major concern.
  • Recognize those in the room –
    Krista Jackman
    Gerol Petruzella
    Larry Domine
    Tony Stanislawski
    Kevin Trowbridge
  • Transcript of "2013 Social Media in Higher Education Survey Results"

    1. 1. Social Media in US Higher Education 2013: Survey and Case Studies Survey: Hester Tinti-Kane, VP, Marketing and Social Media Strategy Jeff Seaman, Co-Director, Babson Survey Research Group 2 How Today’s Higher Education Faculty Use Social Media
    2. 2. Goal: Deeper look at faculty use of social media Fourth annual report – examining year-to-year changes in unique types of usage for this specific population. •Representative national sample of teaching faculty: N = 7,969 •Historical data: How are college faculty using social media? Which social media do faculty use for personal communication? Professional use? For teaching? •New for 2013: What value do faculty see in virtual communities? How are faculty using social media for assignments? 3
    3. 3. History of the Research 4
    4. 4. TYPES OF SOCIAL MEDIA USE 5
    5. 5. Personal Use 6
    6. 6. Majority of Faculty Now Use Social Media Professionally 7
    7. 7. Use of Social Media in Teaching is Growing 8
    8. 8. PERSONAL USE 9
    9. 9. Use of All Sites is Growing 10
    10. 10. Younger Faculty Continue in the Lead 11
    11. 11. PROFESSIONAL USE 12
    12. 12. Growth in Professional Use is Across All Sites 13
    13. 13. Older Faculty are Catching Up 14
    14. 14. Growth Across All Disciplines 15
    15. 15. Many Faculty Participate in Virtual Communities 16
    16. 16. USE IN TEACHING (Not yet!) 17
    17. 17. Technology and the Teaching and Learning Environment 18
    18. 18. Technological Promise The interactive nature of online and mobile technologies create better learning environments – 2013 Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree 19
    19. 19. Technological Concerns Online and mobile technologies are more distracting than helpful to students for academic work – 2013 Strongly Agree Strongly Disagree Somewhat Disagree Somewhat Agree 20
    20. 20. Communications Impact of Digital Communication on Communication with Students Increased No Impact Decreased 0% 21 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%
    21. 21. USE IN TEACHING 22
    22. 22. Greater Teaching Use of All Sites 23
    23. 23. First Time: Youngest Faculty Not in the Lead 24
    24. 24. Discipline “Catch Up” 25
    25. 25. Social Media for Individual Assignments 26
    26. 26. Social Media for Group Assignments 27
    27. 27. Integrity and Privacy Remain Concerns 28
    28. 28. Privacy Issues 29
    29. 29. Social Media Case Studies Study Team • Hester Tinti-Kane, Project Lead • Krista Jackman and Gillian Seely, Case Study Writers • Deborah Forrester, Market Research 30
    30. 30. Social Media Case Studies Objective • To identify faculty members whose use of social tools in the teaching and learning process in higher education will provide rich case studies for digital publication and conference presentations. • Case studies outlined: – – The rationale for that particular use of social tools – How the faculty member has addressed typical concerns surrounding the use of social tools – 31 How the faculty member is using social tools Metrics of success, if available
    31. 31. Social Media Case Studies Implications of the research • Faculty were chosen to highlight the use of social media to achieve one or more of the following goals, which represent opportunities to shape a continuing series of case studies: – – Extend learning outside of class – Support the development of social presence and a personal brand; teach appropriate use of 21st century digital literacy in the workplace – Foster collaborative study – Foster rich discussion: student to teacher, student to student, peer questioning, reflection, especially in online/blended courses and large classes – Support differentiation by focusing on individual identity development – 32 Promote experiential learning/authentic learning Support academic goals: write clearly and concisely; build information literacy and research skills
    32. 32. Thank you! Connect with us… Hester Tinti-Kane @tintikane Hester.Tinti-kane@pearson.com Jeff Seaman jseaman@seagullhaven.com 33
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