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Part II: Volume Control
Part II: Volume Control
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Part II: Volume Control

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  • 1. Creating and Editing Item Records Part 2 1. Search tips (pages 3-13) The “Karate Chop” – “Ctrl+Shift+A” 2. Secondary Sorting 3. “All Keyword Fields” searching 1. 2. Editing item records (pages 14-24) 3. Entering item record “volume field” data for multiple–volume (multi-part) Bib records (p. 25-76) Definitions and Protocols 2. Magazines, serials, discs and other multiple volume Bib record examples 1. Quiz questions (pages 77-end) 2
  • 2. 3
  • 3. Tip # 1 – The “Karate Chop”  When searching in Polaris the results window may contain more results than can be shown in one screen.  In the bottom right corner of the window there may be a     note saying, for example, “28 of 29 records retrieved”. Click on “Ctrl+Shift+A” to retrieve the full list for sorting. The window still only shows 28 of the records, but when the list is sorted, all 29 items will be included in the sort. In the next slide are two screen shots comparing a “sort by title”, before and after retrieving all records. “Ctrl+Shift+A” is “nicknamed” the “karate chop”!  4
  • 4. 28 of 29 items retrieved Click on “Title” in the title bar to sort. Here, sorted alphabetically, by title, only 28 of the 29 retrieved records are included. What if the record sought was 29th on the list? It would not be sorted with the others. 29 of 29 items retrieved In the second case, all the records are retrieved with “Ctrl+Shift+A” before the same sort, by title. The results window when all 29 results are sorted, now includes Bib # 1042833, the 29th record! 5
  • 5. Tip # 2 – Multiple sort levels  In the previous example, “Title” was clicked once, to produce a sort of all the titles retrieved. This is like a primary sort in a spreadsheet, and if there are multiple identical titles, may not be a useful sort.  Choosing a second column to sort (i.e. Publishing date or author) before or after sorting by title, produces a “secondary sort”, which can be very useful! Note: Clicking once on a column title sorts the list from a to z (or lowest number to highest). Clicking a second time on the same column title reverses the order (z to a or highest number to lowest). Clicking a third time on the same title, puts the order back to a to z (lowest # to highest). 6
  • 6. 1. Primary sort 1. Results after “Ctrl+Shift+A”, followed by clicking on “Title” to obtain a primary sort by title. 2. Secondary sort 2. Click on Publication Date to secondarily sort by date. Nine items at the top of the list show no publication date information available from the Bib record. All the records with the same publication date are still in alphabetical order by title. It is safe to assume that none of these nine Bib records without dates are a good choice (probably incomplete) for linking an item. The next slide shows a scroll down to see more records below the first nine… 7
  • 7. 3. Below the nine Bib records with no publication date are 20 Bibs with dates to consider if you are searching for a good Bib record to which to add your new Chatelaine magazine. The choice highlighted is the best place to start! With over 3400 links and a Bib record complete enough to provide Publication Date, it is certainly the best choice in this whole list! At least it is a great place to start! 1. Examine the physical copy. 2. Check the Bib record. 3. Add the holding by creating a new item record. 8
  • 8. Another example of a primary & secondary sort. 1. Use “Ctrl+Shift+A” to include all 250 “Legacy” records in the sort. 2. Sort first by Title. 3. Sort next by Format. It becomes easier to find the magazines (serials) for which you are searching! A secondary sort by author can be a good search practice too! 9
  • 9. Tip # 3 –“All keyword fields”  The “Search by” drop down menus in Bib record or Item record search tools contain very lengthy field lists to help you to search.  Searching by “All keyword fields” (at the top of the alphabetic list) is a very powerful way of pulling more results into your search.  Compare a Bib record “Title” search for the word “Legacy” with an “All keyword fields” search for the same. A “Title” search returns 1223 results, but an “All keyword fields” search returns 2018!  After “Ctrl+Shift+A” to retrieve all records, click on format, then author. On the next slide see how all items by Nora Roberts are grouped by format! 10
  • 10. 1. Search Bib records by “All keyword fields” for “Legacy” 2. Karate chop! (Ctrl+Shift+A) 3. Click on “Format” 4. Click on “Author” Formats (i.e. books, audiobooks, etc.) by Nora Roberts (author) are grouped together. Eight of the 2018 Bib records are “books” by Nora Roberts. “Legacy” will be found either in the title or in the Bib record somewhere! 11
  • 11. Question… In addition to this primary sort by author and secondary sort by format, can you also return a tertiary (3rd level) sort by year of publication, so the books within this sort are in order of publication date? 12
  • 12. Answer: YES 1. Search Bib records by “All keyword fields” for “Legacy” 2. Karate chop! (Ctrl+Shift+A) 3. Click on “Publication Year” 4. Click on “Format” 5. Click on “Author” Books (formats) by Nora Roberts (author) are grouped together and sorted by date! Have fun experimenting with “Find Tools”. The more practice you have, the better you will be at finding the Bib or item record you need! 13
  • 13. 14
  • 14. Editing Item Records 1. Find and open the item record (usually by searching by barcode using an Item Record Search Tool) 2. Change the field requiring correction…for example… Change the collection code or 2. Change the shelving location or 3. Correct the spine label or 4. Link to another Bib record 1. 3. Save your changes 15
  • 15. Editing Item Records-Example 1 “George and the robbers”, an older book was found shelved in the juvenile section, but should be with the picture books… 1. Change the collection code. 2. Change the shelf location. 3. Change the call number prefix. 4. Save changes and print a new spine label. 5. Shelve in the correct section. 2. 1. 3. 16
  • 16. Editing Item Records-Example 1 cont’d. Your consultant may be able to add new collection codes and shelf locations to the drop down menus! Call or email headquarters! 17
  • 17. Editing Item Records-Example 2 In this example, the first six digits of the classification number should NOT be in the prefix field! Enter the prefix contents before the numbers in the class field. Then delete the prefix contents and save the changes. Six digits after the period are usually sufficient. If you split the call number by using a space or by putting some of the class number in the prefix field, your shelf list will not print in the correct order. DO NOT LEAVE SPACES! Your shelf list will show a space between the two zeros, if this field error is present. 18
  • 18. Editing Item Records-Example 2 cont’d. If this is a thin book, you may want to print fewer of the “Class” digits or wrap the number onto several lines so the spine label contains all the numbers. Class field rules: 1. Use the format: xxx.xxxxxx 2. NO alpha characters (those belong in the prefix, cutter or suffix fields) 3. Class numbers should never end in zero 4. Use no period if using three digits only (i.e. 971) The space is gone! The shelf list order will match the order of books on the shelf! 19
  • 19. Editing Item Records-Example 3 While doing inventory, you find that a book has the wrong title! The book in hand is called “Music in the classic period”. This book is linked to the wrong Bib record! Can you change the title in an item record? NO! Note the color of the fields (grey). This means the title field cannot be edited. So, what do you do? 20
  • 20. Editing Item Records-Example 3 cont’d. Think of each Bib record as a sun in a solar system in the Polaris galaxy. The planets circling the sun are the item records. Gravity links planets to their suns. Bib control numbers link item records to their Bibs. Editing the Bib control number in an item record changes the item’s orbit to another solar system! 21
  • 21. Editing Item Records-Example 3 cont’d. This item record is in the wrong solar system, linked there by the Bib control number written in the top right corner! 22
  • 22. Editing Item Records-Example 3 cont’d. Find the correct Bib record, and the Bib Control number. Change the incorrect Bib control number on the item record to the correct Bib control number. 23
  • 23. Editing Item Records-Example 3 cont’d. Now the item record is in orbit around the matching Bib record (control # 98904)! Watch for typing errors – you could accidentally “correct” the name by linking to “Curse the darkness”! (Bib control # 99904). Avoid typos with “copy and paste”! 24
  • 24. 25
  • 25. Definition and Protocols for Volume Field Entries This close up view of the “Call number” section of an item record shows where the “volume data” is entered. Polaris uses the contents of this field for processing hold requests in different ways, and so has strict expectations for how the field is populated. Entries here indicate the volume number of a multiple volume publication. The multiple distinct items are attached to one Bib record. When deciding whether or not to enter information in this field the first question to ask is: Are many different items attached to one Bibliographic record? If the answer is no, leave the field blank: no characters of any kind and no spaces. If you don’t know the answer, send the item to headquarters for cataloguing. 26
  • 26. When NOT to use the Volume Field  For series books like Harry Potter, each individual title in the series will have it’s own Bib record.  The item records that are linked to that Bib record should NOT contain any volume information.  If one or more of the linked item records has data in the volume field, the patron will be incorrectly prompted to choose a volume. 27
  • 27. When NOT to use the Volume Field – continued. ….etc. This series of books is catalogued separately and does not require volume field data. Other examples are The Twilight series, the Hardy Boys, Sweet Valley High, 50 Shades of Grey, Rainbow Magic Fairies…. The books may have a 1 or a 4 or a 23 on the cover to identify them as a part of a series, but they DO NOT require volume field data. Put the number in the suffix field if you want it to be a part of the call number, but NEVER in the volume field! These books are NOT on one Bib record. They are each on their own record. NO volume field data. 28
  • 28. When NOT to use the Volume Field – continued. This is one book in a series. It is tempting to put volume data in the volume field because the number one is printed on the cover and “Volume 1” is printed at the head of the “Table of Contents”. BUT – ask the question… “Are different items attached to the same Bib Record?” (Will all 15 volumes in the series be on the same Bib?) NO! Check the Bib record for confirmation. (next slide) 29
  • 29. When NOT to use the Volume Field – continued. Read the “a” subfield of the 300 (description) tag of the Bib record. If the Bib record has the number of pages noted here, the volume field should be left blank. If it has volume notation (“v.”) the volume field may require volume data. Is the “a” subfield: • a pagination statement? • a v. statement? Answer: “192 pages”, therefore the volume field of the item record stays BLANK. Volume 2 of this series will have its own Bib record. Put the series number in the suffix field if you want it to be a part of the call number. 30
  • 30. When NOT to use the Volume Field – continued. Some books have no page numbers and the 300 tag line contains a “v. statement”: “1 v. (unpaged)”. This means that there are no page numbers printed on the book. Other counting books by Jennifer Adams will have their own Bib records. NO volume field data is required. 31
  • 31. Volume Field Decision Making  Do not go by numbers in the title or on the cover.  Read the Bib record paying special attention to:  The 300 tag (description tag). If the Bib record is full and complete, and there are no page numbers indicated, volume field data could be required.  If you still are uncertain send the item in for cataloguing. 32
  • 32. 33
  • 33. Definition and Protocols for Volume Field Entries This close up view of the “Call number” section of an item record shows where the “volume data” is entered. Polaris uses the contents of this field for processing hold requests in different ways, and so has strict expectations for how the field is populated. Entries here indicate the volume number of a multiple volume publication. The multiple distinct items are attached to one Bib record. When deciding whether or not to enter information in this field the first question to ask is: Are many different items attached to one Bibliographic record? If the answer is yes, follow approved TRAC standards for volume field entries, as shown on the next slides. If you don’t know the answer, send the item to headquarters for cataloguing. 34
  • 34. Volume Field Format Chart 1. 2. 3. 4. If different items are attached to the same Bib record, the next question is “What kind of a multiple-volume publication is it?” The answer will determine the proper volume field format. Formatting standards are outlined in the “TRAC Multi-part Manual”, and summarized in this chart. The first column lists all the different types of multiple part publications. The second column shows the correct format for volume field entries. The third column (grey) contains examples of old, discontinued or incorrect formats. DO NOT USE The fourth column contains examples of correct volume field entries. 35
  • 35. The following slides will work through the chart starting with “Numbered Volumes”, then “Annual with Yearly Date”, etc. Please use ONLY the second and fourth columns of this chart for formatting standards – there are many discontinued or incorrect volume field entries that should not be copied as items are added. Over time, as older items are weeded and discarded, the database should contain only items with volume field data that conforms to these standards. 36
  • 36. Numbered Volumes Numbered volumes are publications that contain multiple volumes produced in the same year. That year will have it’s own Bib record with all the different volumes, or item records attached. Each volume may have its own ISBN, so the Bib record will have many ISBNs added by the cataloguers at headquarters. If you search by ISBN and don’t find a correct Bib record, please send to headquarters. Two different items on one Bib record. 37
  • 37. Numbered Volumes Bib record 176257 has both volumes one and two of “Foley Trail” linked to it. Check tag 300 of the Bib record. The “a” subfield says “2 v.” and does not indicate the number of pages, as the description field does for single volume books. This means the book is printed in two separate bindings. Click on the circled icon at the top of the record to open the linked item record list. Note that in this example, some volume field data is incorrect, and some is missing. Two different items on one Bib record. 38
  • 38. Numbered Volumes The correct format is v.1 or v.2 for the volume fields for your item records. 39
  • 39. Next on the Volume Field Data Chart are “Annuals with Yearly Date”. An example of this kind of publication is “Guinness World Records”. If you are the first library to purchase the new edition, an ISBN scan will produce no results. Cataloguers at headquarters will need to add the new ISBN number to the Bib record. Please send your item to headquarters. Always use the copyright date regardless of date in title! 40
  • 40. Annual with Yearly Date • Are many different items linked to the same Bib? YES – many ISBNs • Is this an “Annual with Yearly Date” (not spanning 2 years)? YES • What does the 300 tag say? v. • What was the copyright date found inside the book? 2011 Conclusion: Always use the copyright date found inside the Enter 2011 in the Vol. field! book regardless of title! 41
  • 41. Annual with Yearly Date Many different items on one Bib record. 42
  • 42. Next on the Volume Field Data Chart are “Annuals with Edition statement only”. It is rare to find a published item with only an edition statement, and no copyright date. Note that the preferred format is the same for the previous type of publication, and the edition number is only to be used if no copyright date can be found on the item. Use copyright date, if available, regardless of the edition number in the title. 43
  • 43. Annual with Edition Statement only • Are many different items linked to the same Bib? YES • What does the 300 tag say? v. • The 9th edition has no copyright date. What should the volume field say for the 17th edition? Hint: Read the 500 tags… Answer…….. 44
  • 44. Annual with Edition Statement only Answer: 2007 On the next screen can you identify which library has the correct volume control entry for the 17th edition? 45
  • 45. Annual with Edition Statement only Only the first record (barcode 30113002537020) is correct! 46
  • 46. Next on the Volume field data chart are “Multiple year” publications. These publications cover more than one year in one volume. Note that the format requires the beginning and ending years separated by a dash. No spaces. 47
  • 47. Multiple Years In this example, the 300 tag suggests that this is a candidate for entering information in the volume field, but there are no ISBNs listed to confirm! Check the list of attached item records to see if there are different items attached to the same Bib record. 48
  • 48. Multiple Years YES! Many years (many different items) are linked to this Bib record. In the volume field of your new item record, enter the first and last year separated by a dash. NO SPACES! 49
  • 49. Next on the Volume Field Data Chart are “Monthly Publications with Alpha Characters”. There are many examples of monthly serials. Chatelaine magazine is one example. Many issues are attached to one Bib record. In the following slides note some interesting details… • The Bib record identifies the magazine as a serial. • The description tag (300) has no pagination (v. only). • Call numbers vary between libraries. 50
  • 50. Monthly Publications with Alpha Characters Note: Above record is in the TRACpac view. 51
  • 51. Monthly Publications with Alpha Characters Many different items on one Bib record. Note the consistent format: Three alpha characters followed immediately by four numeric characters. Even September, which is often abbreviated with four alpha characters (SEPT), is shown with three letters only: SEP 52
  • 52. Monthly Publications with Alpha Characters Note the different call number protocols from library to library, written in the prefix, the cutter, or the suffix fields. But never in the volume field! 53
  • 53. Next on the Volume Field Data Chart are “Bimonthly issue” publications. Some serials are published six times a year, or bimonthly. Format is always the first month and second month separated by a hyphen, immediately followed by the year. NO SPACES 54
  • 54. Bimonthly issues Bib record details show that many different issues will be linked to this one Bib record. 55
  • 55. Bimonthly issues Three items in this list show incorrect volume field data. Can you pick them out? 56
  • 56. Bimonthly issues 1. 2. 3. 1. No hyphen between months. 2. Forward slash is not correct. Use a hyphen. 3. Forward slash is not correct. Use a hyphen. 57
  • 57. Bimonthly issues – spanning year end This issue of the same magazine will be December of one year and January of the next. The correct protocol for this Volume field: DEC2012-JAN2013 58
  • 58. Next on the Volume Field Data Chart are “Quarterly issue Publications”. Often serials are published four time a year, or quarterly. The correct volume field format is always the first three letters of the season, capitalized, followed by the year. NO SPACES Seasons are named: 1. Spring (SPR) 2. Summer (SUM) 3. Autumn (AUT) or Fall (FAL) 4. Winter (WIN) 59
  • 59. Quarterly issues Many issues , one Bib record. Fal2012 is incorrect. FAL2012 is the TRAC standard for volume field data. 60
  • 60. Next on the Volume Field Data Chart are “Numeric issues” publications. These serials are very simple for volume data, enter the number only. No text or symbols are required. 61
  • 61. Numeric issues Many issues , one Bib record. In the linked item list the “copy number” data (c.2) is retrieved from the suffix field entry. 62
  • 62. Next on the Volume Field Data Chart are “Weekly issues” publications. These serials come weekly. 63
  • 63. Weekly issues Many issues , one Bib record. Every volume field is wrong and the second entry has two mistakes! Use “SEP” not “SEPT”. The date should have six digits in total.64
  • 64. Next on the Volume Field Data Chart are publications with only volume and issue data. 65
  • 65. Volume and Issue Numbers Only Many issues, one Bib record. And here there are NO errors in the volume fields!! 66
  • 66. Next on the Volume Field Data Chart are publications with many PARTS, such as DVDs. A “season” of DVDs in one case is an example. Each DVD in the set is different, but all the parts, or discs together form the whole season. If the library chooses to circulate each disc of a season singly, or in sets of two or three, the volume field is what differentiates the items. The chart shows the proper format for indicating what is barcoded together or separately. 67
  • 67. Multipart sets such as DVDs Many parts, one Bib record. 68
  • 68. Multipart sets such as DVDs Most libraries for this collection are circulating all 5 discs together, as a “DISC SET”. One library has split the set into three separate cases, barcoded them, and linked three separate item records to the same Bib, to circulate the discs. Many circulation options! 69
  • 69. Multipart sets such as DVDs One item record, one barcode, one “DISC SET”. If discs 3 & 4 are lost… You can still use discs 1, 2 & 5. Two item records, two barcodes! If you wish the episode information to display in TRACpac, place it in the SUFFIX field – not the COPY field. 70
  • 70. Next on the Volume Field Data Chart are publications with many PARTS, such as VHS. A set of VHS recordings are catalogued with v.1, v.2, v.3 and so on, in the volume field. 71
  • 71. Multipart sets such as VHS Many parts, one Bib record. 72
  • 72. Next on the Volume Field Data Chart are publications with many PARTS, using terms like Part 1,2,3…or Part a,b,c…. 73
  • 73. Multipart publications in “Parts” Many parts, one Bib record. 74
  • 74. Combo-packs All the pieces of this copyrighted unit must stay together and circulate together. If a part of the package becomes lost or unusable, add a public note in the item record, informing patrons that your copy is “Missing the DVD disc” or “Missing the Blu-ray disc”. NO volume field entry is required. 75
  • 75. Combo-packs Make no entry in the volume field. In the “Notes and Notices” view, enter details about your holding in the public note field so it displays in TRACpac and in the free text field so it pops up at check out. 76
  • 76. 77
  • 77. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 1. You are circulating “House”, Season 2 (5 videodiscs) with all the pieces in one case. What information would you enter into the volume field of the item record? 78
  • 78. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 2. You have received a donation of volumes 1-4 of the International Wildlife Encyclopedia (Bib control # 630855). How many item records would you create to link all four items to the Bib record? List the volume information for the item record(s) you create. 79
  • 79. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 3. Decide the correct volume information for “Guinness Book of World Records, 2013”, published in 2012. 80
  • 80. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 4. Decide the correct volume information for “Chilton’s Import Auto Service Manual”, 1990-1995, Bib Control # 162583. 81
  • 81. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 5. You purchased the Blu-ray/DVD combo pack: “A Christmas Carol” (Bib control number 889988). How do you proceed? 82
  • 82. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 6. You purchase a subscription to “Rural Roots” (magazine), and receive the first issue (Spring, 2013). Which Bib record number do you use to create an item record for this issue, and what volume field data do you enter? 83
  • 83. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 7. You are adding an item record to Bib # 877349, do you need to enter volume information in the volume field, and if so what will you enter? 84
  • 84. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 8. You are adding the June, 2012 issue of Clean Eating (magazine) to your library. What is the correct volume information? 85
  • 85. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 9. You received a donation of a two-volume VHS documentary, that has a good Bib record. What will be the volume field information to circulate the items separately? 86
  • 86. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 10. What is the correct volume field information for an item you are attaching to Bib record # 397274? a) Volume field should be empty b) v.2 c) VOL2 d) V.II 87
  • 87. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 11. For Maclean’s (magazine) published February 6, 2012, what should be entered in the volume field? 88
  • 88. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 12. You have DVD cases in stock that will hold 2 DVDs. A five disc set has just come back with the case broken. How will you circulate the discs now? Include volume information in your answer. 89
  • 89. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 13. You purchased Season 2 of Blues Clues and want to circulate each of the four discs separately. What volume field entries do you use? 90
  • 90. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 14. What volume field entries do you create for your new issue of Cooks Illustrated (magazine) Issue: December 2012-January 2013? 91
  • 91. Search in Polaris for the answers to this short quiz… 15. You are adding a travel guide to your collection: The Lonely Planet guide to Hawaii, 9th edition. What goes in the volume field? 92
  • 92. Quiz – questions… 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. You are circulating “House”, Season 2 (5 videodiscs) with all the pieces in one case. What information would you enter into the volume field of the item record? You have received a donation of volumes 1-4 of the International Wildlife Encyclopedia (Bib control # 630855). How many item records would you create to link all four items to the Bib record? List the volume information for the item record(s) you create. Decide the correct volume information for “Guinness Book of World Records, 2013”, published in 2012. Decide the correct volume information for “Chilton’s Import Auto Service Manual”, 1990-1995, Bib Control # 162583. You purchased the Blu-ray/DVD combo pack: “A Christmas Carol” (Bib control number 889988). How do you proceed? You purchase a subscription to “Rural Roots” (magazine), and receive the first issue (Spring, 2013). What Bib record number to you use to create an item record for this issue, and what volume field data do you enter? You are adding an item record to Bib # 877349, do you need to enter volume information in the volume field, and if so what will you enter? You are adding the June, 2012 issue of Clean Eating (magazine) to your library. What is the correct volume information? You received a donation of a two-volume VHS cassette tape documentary, that has a good Bib record. What will be the volume field information to circulate the items separately? What is the correct volume field information for an item you are attaching to Bib record # 397274? a) Volume field should be empty b) v.2 c) VOL2 d) V.II For Maclean’s (magazine) published February 6, 2012, what should be entered in the volume field? You have DVD cases in stock that will hold 2 DVDs. A five disc set has just come back with the case broken. How will you circulate the discs now? Include volume information in your answer. You purchased Season 2 of Blues Clues and want to circulate each of the four discs separately. What volume field entries do you use? What volume field entries do you create for your new issue of Cooks Illustrated (magazine) Issue: December 2012January 2013? You are adding a travel guide to your collection: The Lonely Planet guide to Hawaii, 9th edition. What goes in the volume field? 93

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