20 pics b

495 views
360 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
495
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

20 pics b

  1. 1. Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, 12e Chapter 33 The Development of Modernist Art: The Early 20th Century 1
  2. 2. European Expressionism after World War I • Understand the intense realistic post-war expressionism of German artists. • Understand the European post-war malaise and the importance of cathartic subject matter in Expressionist art. • Examine the origins, development, methods and content of Surrealism and Fantasy art. 2
  3. 3. Post-war Expressionism• Understand the post-war expressionism of German artists. 3
  4. 4. Figure 33-38GEORGE GROSZ, Fitfor Active Service,1916–1917. Pen andbrush and ink on paper,1’ 8” x 1’ 2 3/8”.Museum of ModernArt, New York (A.Conger GoodyearFund). Copyright ©Estate of GeorgeGrosz/Licensed byVAGA, New York, NY. 4
  5. 5. Figure 33-39 MAX BECKMANN, Night, 1918–1919. Oil on canvas, 4’ 4 3/8” x 5’ 1/4”.Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf. 5
  6. 6. Figure 33-40 OTTO DIX, Der Krieg (The War), 1929–1932. Oil and tempera on wood, 6’ 8 1/3”x 13’ 4 3/4”. Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Gemäldegalerie Neue Meister, Dresden. 6
  7. 7. Figure 33-42 WILHELM LEHMBRUCK, Seated Youth, 1917. Composite tinted and plaster, 3’ 45/8” x 2’ 6” x 3’ 9”. National Gallery of Art, Washington. (Andrew W. Mellon Fund). 7
  8. 8. Figure 33-43 ERNST BARLACH, WarMonument, from Güstrow Cathedral,Güstrow, Germany, 1927. Bronze.Schildergasse Antoniterkirche, Cologne. 8
  9. 9. Surrealism and Fantasy• Examine the development, methods and content of Surrealism and Fantasy art. 9
  10. 10. Figure 33-44 GIORGIO DECHIRICO, Melancholy andMystery of a Street, 1914. Oil oncanvas, 2’ 10 1/4” x 2’ 4 1/2”.Private collection. 10
  11. 11. Figure 33-45 MAX ERNST,Two Children Are Threatenedby a Nightingale, 1924. Oil onwood with woodconstruction, 2’ 3 1/2” high,1’ 10 1/2” wide, 4 1/2” deep.Museum of Modern Art, NewYork (purchase). 11
  12. 12. Figure 33-46 SALVADOR DALÍ, The Persistence of Memory, 1931. Oil on canvas, 9 1/2” x 1’ 1”.Museum of Modern Art, New York (given anonymously). 12
  13. 13. Figure 33-47 RENÉ MAGRITTE, The Treachery (or Perfidy) of Images, 1928–1929. Oil oncanvas, 1’ 11 5/8” x 3’ 1”. Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles 13
  14. 14. Figure 33-48 MERET OPPENHEIM, Object (Le Déjeuner en fourrure), 1936. Fur-covered cup, 43/8” in diameter; saucer, 9 3/8” in diameter; spoon, 8”. Museum of Modern Art, New York(purchase). 14
  15. 15. Figure 33-49FRIDA KAHLO,The Two Fridas,1939. Oil oncanvas, 5’ 7” x 5’7”. Collection ofthe Museo deArte Moderno,Mexico City. 15
  16. 16. Figure 33-50 JOAN MIRÓ, Painting, 1933. 5’ 8” x 6’ 5”. Museum of Modern Art, New York(Loula D. Lasker Bequest by exchange). 16
  17. 17. Figure 33-51 PAUL KLEE,Twittering Machine, 1922. Watercolorand pen and ink, on oil transferdrawing on paper, mounted oncardboard, 2’ 1” x 1’ 7”. Museum ofModern Art, New York (purchase). 17
  18. 18. New Art for a New Society• Understand the early 20th century belief that art could contribute to improving society.• Examine the art movements that espoused utopian notions such as Suprematism and Constructivism in Russia, De Stijl in Holland, and the Bauhaus in Germany.• Examine the International Style in architecture and the concept of modernism in architecture.• Understand the geometric forms of Art Deco and Modern Sculpture.• Understand the desire for natural and organic forms in sculpture and architecture. 18
  19. 19. The Utopian Styles• Examine the forms and utopian notions in Suprematism, Constructivism, and in De Stijl. 19
  20. 20. Figure 33-52 KAZIMIRMALEVICH, SuprematistComposition: Airplane Flying,1915 (dated 1914). Oil oncanvas, 1’ 10 7/8” x 1’ 7”.Museum of Modern Art, NewYork (purchase). 20
  21. 21. Figure 33-53 NAUM GABO, Column, ca.1923 (reconstructed 1937). Perspex, wood,metal, glass, 3’ 5” x 2’ 5” x 2’ 5”. Solomon R.Guggenheim Museum, New York. 21
  22. 22. Figure 33-54 Photograph ofVladimir Tatlin with Monument tothe Third International, 1919–1920.Annenberg School forCommunication, University ofSouthern California, Los Angeles. 22
  23. 23. Figure 33-55PIETMONDRIAN,Composition inRed, Blue, andYellow, 1930. Oilon canvas, 2’ 45/8” x 1’ 9 1/4”.Private Collection. 23
  24. 24. Modernism in Architecture• Examine the forms of Modernist designs and architecture of the Bauhaus and in the International Style. 24
  25. 25. Figure 33-56 GERRIT THOMAS RIETVELD, Schröder House, Utrecht, the Netherlands, 1924. 25
  26. 26. Figure 33-57 LÁSZLÓ MOHOLY-NAGY, From the Radio Tower Berlin,1928. Gelatin silver print. The ArtInstitute of Chicago, Chicago. 26
  27. 27. Figure 33-58JOSEF ALBERS,Homage to theSquare:“Ascending”,1953. Oil oncompositionboard, 3’ 7 1/2” x3’ 7 1/2”.Collection ofWhitney Museumof American Art,New York(purchase). 27
  28. 28. Figure 33-59 WALTER GROPIUS, Shop Block, the Bauhaus, Dessau, Germany, 1925–1926. 28
  29. 29. Figure 33-60 MARCEL BREUER, tubular chair, 1925. 29
  30. 30. Figure 33-61 GUNTA STÖLZL, Gobelintapestry, 1926–1927. Linen and cotton. 30
  31. 31. Figure 33-62 LUDWIG MIES VAN DERROHE, model for a glass skyscraper, Berlin,Germany, 1922 (no longer extant). 31
  32. 32. Figure 33-63 LE CORBUSIER, perspective drawing for Domino House project, Marseilles,France, 1914. 32
  33. 33. Figure 33-64 LE CORBUSIER, Villa Savoye, Poissy-sur-Seine, France, 1929. 33
  34. 34. Figure 33-65 WILLIAM VAN ALEN, Chrysler Building,New York, New York, 1928–1930. Spire of stainless steel,overall height 1,048’. 34
  35. 35. ErteDIRECTOIREBronze statue with hand paintedmulticolored patina, 198523.0 in. by 13.0 in. 35
  36. 36. Natural and Organic Forms• Reaction against mechanization and growth of technology.• FLW worked under Louis Sullivan• “architecture of democracy” – right to move in a “free” space• Non-symmetrical designs interact spatially w/ natural surroundings – adjust the building to its site• **continuity**• “prairie house” – reaching out toward the flatlands – no façade, roofs extended beyond walls, wandering plan based around central hearth, enclosed patios/strip windows – all give sense of motion inside & out [Robie House]• Fallingwater – enclosing space, not mass• Usonian houses – less expensive, basis for suburban housing developments post-WWII 36
  37. 37. Figure 33-66 FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, Robie House, Chicago, Illinois, 1907–1909. 37
  38. 38. Figure 33-67FRANKLLOYDWRIGHT,plan of theRobie House,Chicago,Illinois, 1907–1909. 38
  39. 39. Figure 33-68 FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT, Kaufmann House (Fallingwater), Bear Run,Pennsylvania, 1936–1939. 39
  40. 40. •Essence of flight •Curving surfaces, ovoid forms •Cycle of lifeFigure 33-69 CONSTANTIN BRANCUSI, Bird inSpace, 1928. Bronze (unique cast), 4’ 6” x 8” x 6” high.Museum of Modern Art, New York (given anonymously). 40
  41. 41. • Pristine shape w/ organic vitality • Conscious use of void or negative spaceFigure 33-70 BARBARA HEPWORTH, Oval Sculpture (No. 2), 1943. Plaster cast, 11 1/4” x16 1/4” x 10”. Tate Gallery, London. 41
  42. 42. • Organic forms + void use • Wood – use of wood grain • Metal/stone – hardness & solidity • Reclining female figureFigure 33-71 HENRY MOORE, Reclining Figure, 1939. Elm wood, 3’ 1” x 6’ 7” x 2’ 6”.Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit (Founders Society purchase with funds from the Dexter M.Ferry, Jr. Trustee Corporation). 42
  43. 43. • Inspired by Mondrian • Duchamp coined term “mobiles” • Reality’s dynamism • Love of nature – suggest clouds, leaves, waves, etc.Figure 33-72 ALEXANDER CALDER, Untitled, 1976. Aluminum honeycomb, tubing, and paint,29’ 10 1/2” x 76’. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. (Gift of the Collectors Committee). 43
  44. 44. Art as Political Statement• Expressing emotions and facts of social injustice• Guernica = grief• Propaganda = Soviet worker ennobled• Depression = WPA projects to support artists (art for federal buildings)• Personifying conditions of displaced (Lange), loneliness & isolation (Hopper), AA Migration (Lawrence)• Regionalism (Wood) – nationalist feeling• Mexican muralists – mixing European w/ traditional images, pride in history 44
  45. 45. Figure 33-73 PABLO PICASSO, Guernica, 1937. Oil on canvas, 11’ 5 1/2” x 25’ 5 3/4”.Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid. 45
  46. 46. Figure 33-74 VERA MUKHINA, Workerand Collective Farm Worker. Sculpture forthe Soviet Pavilion, Paris Exposition, 1937.Stainless steel, approx. 78’ high. 46
  47. 47. Rebellion and Social Injustice as Subject Matter in Art• Examine the depiction of social injustice, poverty, urban isolation and other social issues in art. 47
  48. 48. Figure 33-75 DOROTHEALANGE, Migrant Mother,Nipomo Valley, 1935. Gelatinsilver print. Copyright © theDorothea Lange Collection, TheOakland Museum of California,City of Oakland (gift of Paul S.Taylor). 48
  49. 49. Figure 33-76 EDWARD HOPPER, Nighthawks, 1942. Oil on canvas, 2’ 6” x 4’ 8 11/16”.The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago (Friends of American Art Collection). 49
  50. 50. Figure 33-77 JACOB LAWRENCE, No.49 from The Migration of the Negro, 1940–1941. Tempera on masonite, 1’ 6” x 1’. ThePhillips Collection, Washington. 50
  51. 51. Documenting Lives in Art• Examine the political content of art resulting from African American migration along with the themes of Regionalism. 51
  52. 52. Figure 33-78 GRANTWOOD, American Gothic,1930. Oil on beaverboard, 2’ 57/8” x 2’ 7/8”. Art Institute ofChicago, Chicago (Friends ofAmerican Art Collection). 52
  53. 53. Figure 33-79 THOMAS HART BENTON, Pioneer Days and Early Settlers, State Capitol,Jefferson City, 1936. Mural. Copyright © T. H. Benton and R. P. Benton Testamentary Trusts/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. 53
  54. 54. The Mexican Muralists• Examine the art of the Mexican muralists along with their mediums, techniques, and methods. 54
  55. 55. Figure 33-80 JOSÉ CLEMENTE OROZCO, Epic of American Civilization: Hispano-America(panel 16), Baker Memorial Library, Dartmouth College, Hanover, ca. 1932–1934. Fresco. Copyright© Orozco Valladares Family/SOMAAP, Mexico/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. 55
  56. 56. Figure 33-81 DIEGO RIVERA, Ancient Mexico, from the History of Mexico fresco murals,National Palace, Mexico City, 1929–1935. Fresco. 56
  57. 57. Discussion Questions What caused artists in the early 20th century to reject observational naturalism in art? How did Cubism influence other art styles in the early 20th century? Why is art a powerful means for the expression of sociopolitical concerns? 57

×