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20 pics a student
 

20 pics a student

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  • American ridicules
  • African American artist, the jazz age, Harlem Renaissance not quite cubism, reduced to simpliifed geo shapes, monochromatic noahs arch animal. Noah is rep as a black and white fig
  • Early work
  • Like photographers, does lots of close up, simplified forms, usually non threatening

20 pics a student 20 pics a student Presentation Transcript

  • Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, 12e Chapter 33 The Development of Modernist Art: The Early 20th Century 1
  • Colonial Empires About 1900 2
  • Historical Context 1• First half of 20th century generally called Modernism• Decisive changes Events:• Contrasts of ideals• Intellectual challenge 3
  • Historical Context 2• Revised views• Art reflects new discoveries & theories –• Discoveries• Advances in all science fields• Nietzsche 4
  • Historical Context 3• Marxism• Anxiety• Living conditions• Nationalism/Imperialism leads to WWI –• End of Imperial Russia, rise of Communism - 5
  • Historical Context 4• Great Depression• WWII =• Ends using military technology = atomic bomb• Avant-garde became major force =• “Search for new definitions of and uses for art in radically changed world”• Some 6
  • I. Expressionism “art that is the result of the artist’s unique inner or personal vision and that often has an emotional dimension” “Sought empathy – a connection between internal states of artists and viewers, not sympathy”• color and space issues of• styles of the German Expressionists –• Abstract Expressionism – 7
  • Kirchner Matisse Kandinsky Die Brücke (German) Fauvism Der Blaue (French) Reiter (German) Expressionism Derain Marc Abstract Picasso Braque Expressionism Futurism (Italy) Cubism [motion + sociopolitical Agenda] (France) Purism [machine esthetic] Boccioni Analytic Synthetic Le Corbusier[analyzing form] [no relation to tangible objects] 8
  • The Art of the Fauves• French: “?”• Directness of Impressionism, but• Outward Expressionism –• Simplified designs• Distorted• Vigorous• Flat• Bare _____________ as part of design 9
  • “Color was not given to us inorder that we should imitateNature, but so that we canexpress our own emotions.”- Matisse“It’s not a woman; it is apainting.” Exactly the point.“I did not create a woman. I madea picture.” Art does not representreality; it reconstructs it.Feel-good paintings – shouldbring pleasure to the viewerFigure 33-1 HENRI MATISSE, Womanwith the Hat, 1905. Oil on canvas, 2’7 ¾” X1’ 11 ½”. San Francisco Museum of ModernArt, San Francisco. 10
  • Figure 33-2 HENRI MATISSE, Red Room (Harmony in Red), 1908–1909. Oil on canvas, approx.5’ 11” x 8’ 1”. State Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg. 11
  • HENRI MATISSE The Bare Mount 12
  • HENRI MATISSE The Green Stripe 13
  • HENRI MATISSE The Joy of Life 14
  • Figure 33-3 ANDRÉ DERAIN, The Dance, 1906. Oil on canvas, 6’ 7/8” x 6’ 10 1/4”. FridartFoundation, London. 15
  • The German Expressionists• Art should express• Use of• Die Brucke –• Der Blaue Reiter – 16
  • Die Brucke 17
  • Figure 33-4 ERNST LUDWIG KIRCHNER, Street, Dresden, 1908 (dated 1907). Oil on canvas, 4’11 1/4” x 6’ 6 7/8”. Museum of Modern Art, New York (purchase). 18
  • Figure 33-5 EMIL NOLDE, Saint Mary of Egypt among Sinners, 1912. Left panel of a triptych, oilon canvas, approx. 2’ 10” x 3’ 3”. Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg. 19
  • Der Blaue Reiter 20
  • Figure 33-6 VASSILY KANDINSKY, Improvisation 28 (second version), 1912. Oil on canvas, 3’7 7/8” x 5’ 3 7/8”. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York 21
  • Figure 33-7 FRANZ MARC, Fate of the Animals, 1913. Oil on canvas, 6’ 4 3/4” x 8’ 9 1/2”.Kunstmuseum, Basel. 22
  • The Beginnings of Abstraction• the rejection of• the Cubists• the forms and concepts• the materials and forms of.• other forms of Cubism: 23
  • Early Cubism• the fragmentation of form and the rejection of illusion in early Cubism 24
  • • Could draw before he could talk• First word was “pencil”• Blue period – poor period, reflected his life• Rose period – happy subjects, life• Negro period – African influence• Cubism – painting & sculptureFigure 33-8 PABLO PICASSO,Gertrude Stein, 1906–1907. Oil oncanvas, 3’ 3 3/8” x 2’ 8”.Metropolitan Museum of Art, NewYork (bequest of Gertrude Stein,1947). 25
  • Harbinger ofcubismEffectively endedHazy on anatomyFracturedperspective“I paint what Iknow, not what Isee”Figure 33-9 PABLOPICASSO, LesDemoiselles d’Avignon,June–July 1907. Oil oncanvas, 8’ x 7’ 8”. Museumof Modern Art, New York 26
  • PABLO PICASSO Guernica, 1937, Reina Sofia Art Center, Madrid 27
  • The Development of Cubism• the concepts behind analytic and synthetic cubism, and the other forms of cubism in the early 20th century. 28
  • Analytic Cubism 29
  • Figure 33-10 GEORGES BRAQUE,The Portuguese, 1911. Oil on canvas, 3’10 1/8” x 2’ 8”. ÖffentlicheKunstsammlung Basel, Kunstmuseum,Basel (gift of Raoul La Roche, 1952). 30
  • Figure 33-11 ROBERTDELAUNAY, Champs de Marsor The Red Tower, 1911. Oil oncanvas, 5’ 3” x 4’ 3”. Art Instituteof Chicago, Chicago. 31
  • Synthetic Cubism 32
  • Figure 33-12 PABLO PICASSO, Still Life with Chair-Caning, 1912. Oil and oilcloth on canvas, 105/8” x 1’ 1 3/4”. Musée Picasso, Paris. 33
  • Figure 33-13 GEORGES BRAQUE, Bottle, Newspaper, Pipe and Glass, 1913. Charcoal andvarious papers pasted on paper, 1’ 6 7/8” x 2’ 1 1/4”. Private collection, New York. 34
  • Cubist Sculpture 35
  • Figure 33-14 PABLOPICASSO, Maquette for Guitar,1912. Cardboard, string, and wire(restored), 25 1/4” x 13” x 71/2”. Museum of Modern Art,New York. 36
  • Figure 33-15 JACQUES LIPCHITZ, Bather, 1917.Bronze, 2’ 10 3/4” x 1’ 1 1/4” x 1’ 1”. Nelson-AtkinsMuseum of Art, Kansas City (gift of the Friends of Art).Copyright © Estate of Jacques Lipchitz/Licensed byVAGA, New York/Marlborough Gallery, NY. 37
  • Figure 33-16 ALEKSANDR ARCHIPENKO, Woman CombingHer Hair, 1915. Bronze, approx. 1’ 1 3/4” high. Museum ofModern Art, New York (bequest of Lillie P. Bliss). 38
  • Figure 33-17 JULIO GONZÁLEZ, Woman Combing HerHair, ca. 1930–1933. Iron, 4’ 9” high. Moderna Museet,Stockholm. 39
  • Purism 40
  • Figure 33-18 FERNAND LÉGER, The City, 1919. Oil on canvas, approx. 7’ 7” x 9’ 9 1/2”.Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia (A. E. Gallatin Collection). 41
  • Futurism - Italy• Interest similar to Cubists, but with ?• Wash away Influence of modern technology.• Focuses on 42
  • Figure 33-19 GIACOMO BALLA, Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash, 1912. Oil on canvas, 2’ 113/8” x 3’ 7 1/4”. Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York 43
  • Figure 33-20 UMBERTOBOCCIONI, Unique Forms ofContinuity in Space, 1913 (cast1931). Bronze, 3’ 7 7/8” high x2’ 10 7/8” x 1’ 3 3/4”. Museumof Modern Art, New York 44
  • Figure 5-82 Nike alighting on a warship (Nike of Samothrace), from Samothrace, Greece, ca. 190BCE. Marble, figure approx. 8’ 1” high. Louvre, Paris. 45
  • Figure 33-21 GINO SEVERINI,Armored Train, 1915. Oil on canvas,3’ 10” x 2’ 10 1/8”. Collection ofRichard S. Zeisler, New York. 46
  • Dada: A State of Mind• Dada emphasizes• Dada rejects• Nonsense word, seems nonsensical –• Denouncing• “Chance” collage 47
  • Figure 33-22 JEAN ARP, CollageArranged According to the Laws ofChance, 1916–1917. Torn and pastedpaper, 1’ 7 1/8” x 1’ 1 5/8”. Museum ofModern Art, New York (purchase). 48
  • Figure 33-23 MARCEL DUCHAMP, Fountain, (second version), 1950 (original version produced1917). Ready-made glazed sanitary china with black paint, 12” high. Philadelphia Museum of Art,Philadelphia 49
  • Figure 33-24 MARCEL DUCHAMP, TheBride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even(The Large Glass), 1915-23. Oil, lead, wire,foil, dust, and varnish on glass, 9’ 1 1/2” x 5’ 91/8”. Philadelphia Museum of Art,Philadelphia (Katherine S. Dreier Bequest). 50
  • Figure 33-25 HANNAH HÖCH,Cut with the Kitchen Knife Dadathrough the Last Weimar BeerBelly Cultural Epoch of Germany,1919–1920. Photomontage, 3’ 9” x2’ 11 1/2”. Neue Nationalgalerie,Staatliche Museen, Berlin. 51
  • Figure 33-26 KURTSCHWITTERS, Merz 19, 1920.Paper collage, approx. 7 1/4” x 57/8”. Yale University Art Gallery,New Haven, (gift of CollectionSociété Anonyme). 52
  • Transatlantic Dialogues• American artists in Europe• Americans grounded in realist tradition before influence of incoming European artists after Armory Show & WWI 53
  • Figure 33-27 JOHN SLOAN, Sixth Avenue and 30th Street, 1907, 1909. Oil on canvas, 26 1/4” x32”. Private Collection (Mr. And Mrs. Meyer P. Potamkin). 54
  • Armory Show• European artists came to America to show modern arts – held in the• Matisse,____________, Braque, ___________. ______________, Kirchner, ______________• Showed _____________________ the latest & newest ideas• Traveled to _________ & ___________ also• Stieglitz’s ______ 55
  • Figure 33-28 Installation photo of the Armory Show, New York National Guard’s 69th Regiment,New York, 1913. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. 56
  • Figure 33-29 MARCEL DUCHAMP, NudeDescending a Staircase, No. 2, 1912. Oil oncanvas, approx. 4’ 10 “x 2’ 11”. PhiladelphiaMuseum of Art, Philadelphia (Louise and WalterArensberg Collection). 57
  • Photography as Art• Stieglitz –• “Unmanipulated” photos –• Interest in• Moves toward abstraction – 58
  • Figure 33-30 ALFREDSTIEGLITZ, The Steerage,1907 (print 1915). Photogravure(on tissue), 1’ 3/8” x 10 1/8”.Courtesy of Amon CarterMuseum, Fort Worth. 59
  • Figure 33-31 EDWARD WESTON, Nude, 1925. Platinum print. Collection, Center for CreativePhotography, University of Arizona, Tucson. 60
  • Discussion Questions What caused artists in the early 20th century to reject observational naturalism in art? 61
  • American Art Forms• the distinctive American art forms seem in photography, art of the Harlem Renaissance, and precisionist forms of Cubism. 62
  • Figure 33-32 MAN RAY, Cadeau(Gift), ca. 1958 (replica of 1921original). Painted flatiron with row of13 tacks with heads glued to thebottom, 6 1/8” high, 3 5/8” wide, 41/2” deep. Museum of Modern Art,New York (James Thrall Soby Fund). 63
  • Figure 33-33 MARSDEN HARTLEY,Portrait of a German Officer, 1914. Oil oncanvas, 5 8 1/4” x 3 5 3/8”. The MetropolitanMuseum of Art, New York (Alfred StieglitzCollection). 64
  • Figure 33-34 STUART DAVIS, Lucky Strike,1921. Oil on canvas, 2’ 9 1/4” x 1’ 6”. Museumof Modern Art, New York (gift of TheAmerican Tobacco Company, Inc.). Copyright© Estate of Stuart Davis/Licensed by VAGA,New York, NY. 65
  • Figure 33-35 AARONDOUGLAS, Noah’s Ark, ca. 1927.Oil on masonite, 4’ x 3’. FiskUniversity Galleries, Nashville,Tennessee. 66
  • AARON DOUGLAS IntoBondage 1936. Oil on canvas,153.4 x 153.7 cm. Collection ofthe Corcoran Gallery of Art,Washington DC 67
  • Figure 33-36 CHARLESDEMUTH, My Egypt, 1927.Oil on composition board,2’ 11 3/4” x 2’ 6”.Collection of WhitneyMuseum of American Art,New York 68
  • Figure 33-37 GEORGIA O’KEEFFE, New York,Night, 1929. Oil on canvas, 3’ 4 1/8” x 1’ 7 1/8”.Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, Lincoln, Nebraska(Nebraska Art Association, Thomas C. WoodsMemorial Collection). 69
  • GEORGIA O’KEEFFE, BellaDonna, 1939 . Oil on canvas, 361/4 x 30 1/8 in. privatecollection 70