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19 c postimp sym pics
 

19 c postimp sym pics

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  • The bright red contrasting with the black and white does experimentation with color
  • Stages of life, cont narr. Color and form instead of trying to rep light on a surface
  • Close up, dots of color near each other are called pointalism, the blue and yellow dots are close to each other and from far away it is seen as green
  • Experimenting with form, what makes the basic form
  • Very geometric shapes He is the grandfather of cubism

19 c postimp sym pics 19 c postimp sym pics Presentation Transcript

  • Post-Impressionism
  • Post-Impressionism• differences in emotional expression and subject choices between the Impressionists and the Post- Impressionists.• Post-Impressionist experimentation with form and color.• individuality of the Post-Impressionist artists and the styles each one developed.
  • Figure 29-34 VINCENT VAN GOGH, The Night Café, 1888. Oil on canvas, approx. 2’ 4 1/2”x 3’. Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven (bequest of Stephen Carlton Clark, B.A., 1903).
  • Figure 29-35 VINCENT VAN GOGH, Starry Night, 1889. Oil on canvas, approx. 2’ 5” x 3’ 1/4”. Museum of Modern Art, New York (acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest).
  • Figure 29-36 PAUL GAUGUIN, The Vision after the Sermon or Jacob Wrestling with theAngel, 1888. Oil on canvas, 2’ 4 3/4” x 3’ 1/2”. National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh.
  • Post-Impressionist Experimentation• experimentation with form and color.
  • Figure 29-37 PAUL GAUGUIN, Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?, 1897. Oil on canvas, 4’ 6 13/ 16” x 12’ 3”. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (Tompkins Collection).
  • Figure 29-38 GEORGES SEURAT, detail of A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, 1884–1886.
  • Figure 29-39 GEORGES SEURAT, A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, 1884–1886. Oil on canvas, approx. 6’ 9” ´ 10’. The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago
  • Post-Impressionist Form• the extraordinary art of Cezanne and his interest in form, paving the way for Cubism.
  • Figure 29-40 PAUL CÉZANNE, Mont Sainte-Victoire, 1902–1904. Oil on canvas, 2’ 3 1/2” x 2’ 11 1/4”. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia.
  • Figure 29-41 PAUL CÉZANNE, The Basket of Apples, ca. 1895. Oil on canvas, 2’ 3/8” x 2’7”. The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago (Helen Birch Bartlett Memorial Collection, 1926).
  • Symbolism• issues of imagination, fantasy, and formal changes in the art of the Symbolists.• “modern psychic life” in the art of the Symbolists.
  • Figure 29-42 PIERRE PUVIS DE CHAVANNES, The Sacred Grove, 1884. Oil on canvas, 2’ 11 1/2” x 6’ 10”. The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago (Potter Palmer Collection).
  • Figure 29-43 GUSTAVE MOREAU, Jupiter andSemele, ca. 1875. Oil on canvas, approx. 7’ x 3’ 4”. Musée Gustave Moreau, Paris.
  • Figure 29-43 GUSTAVE MOREAU, Jupiterand Semele, ca. 1875. Oil on canvas, approx. 7’ x 3’ 4”. Musée Gustave Moreau, Paris.
  • Figure 29-44 ODILON REDON,The Cyclops, 1898. Oil on canvas, 2’ 1” x 1’ 8”. Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, The Netherlands.
  • Figure 29-45 HENRI ROUSSEAU, The Sleeping Gypsy, 1897. Oil on canvas, 4’ 3” x 6’ 7”. Museum of Modern Art, New York (gift of Mrs. Simon Guggenheim).
  • Rousseau
  • Figure 29-46 EDVARD MUNCH,The Cry, 1893. Oil, pastel, and casein on cardboard, 2’ 11 3/4” x 2’ 5”. National Gallery, Oslo.