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Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
Work and Enterprise - A New Future
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Work and Enterprise - A New Future

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  • Carrot and stick approach –sanctions with incentives Argument reform needed Unsustainable welfare state Culture of benefit dependency – 3 generations in worklessness, highest proportion of workless households in Europe But – where are the jobs going to come from? Will the announced 21 new enterprise zones have the desired impact Young people hardest hit -1 in 5 now out of work creating generation of adults not fit for work As a society, can we reverse the trend of increased benefit dependency? Research - 1996 USA introduced work related activity as requirement for benefit; within 5yrs welfare claimants reduced 50% after 10yrs, average incomes of those previously on benefits increased 35% Welfare reform dropped the most controversial proposal of a 10% cut in Job seekers allowance Potential for significant impact on customers New conditions for benefit claimants; compulsory work related and work preparation activities Good news recent budget announced cash boost to apprenticeships To include tougher 3 strikes and your rules - loss of benefits for up to 26wks for those who don’t comply Getting work alone may not be enough – further requirements to obtain more or better paid work New conditionality with new powers alongside a Back to Work programme and review of long term sicknes benefit systems. Intro of a benefit cap linked to average weekly earnings limiting total annual benefits (with an excess taken from the housing element of benefit) – likely to hit only large families in WM on highest AR Other risks to rental income Non dependant deductions –reasonable to assume most at risk household types will be Lone Parents and Multi-Adults with children at aged 32yrs plus (children will then be aged 16yrs+). Under occupancy – from April 2013, introduction of size criteria for working age social tenants (exist within PRS now). HB for property size you would be entitled to if on w/l not property size you are in. Reasonable to assume most at risk will be LP & MA+C with 2 beds or more aged 40+ (children more likely to have left home). Localism bill - Proposes shift of power from central govt to local people, new freedoms and flexibilities for local govt New rights and powers for communities and individuals Concerns for double dip recession receding - but …. economic situation still hugely challenging – slow growth, high inflation – Unemployment levels rising (small dip this month) and concern pte sector growth will not provide enough new jobs to compensate for public sector Lending still very tight – mortgage availability constrained high deposits and low loan to value required – low interest rates and falling house prices
  • Carrot and stick approach –sanctions with incentives Argument reform needed Unsustainable welfare state Culture of benefit dependency – 3 generations in worklessness, highest proportion of workless households in Europe But – where are the jobs going to come from? Will the announced 21 new enterprise zones have the desired impact Young people hardest hit -1 in 5 now out of work creating generation of adults not fit for work As a society, can we reverse the trend of increased benefit dependency? Research - 1996 USA introduced work related activity as requirement for benefit; within 5yrs welfare claimants reduced 50% after 10yrs, average incomes of those previously on benefits increased 35% Welfare reform dropped the most controversial proposal of a 10% cut in Job seekers allowance Potential for significant impact on customers New conditions for benefit claimants; compulsory work related and work preparation activities Good news recent budget announced cash boost to apprenticeships To include tougher 3 strikes and your rules - loss of benefits for up to 26wks for those who don’t comply Getting work alone may not be enough – further requirements to obtain more or better paid work New conditionality with new powers alongside a Back to Work programme and review of long term sicknes benefit systems. Intro of a benefit cap linked to average weekly earnings limiting total annual benefits (with an excess taken from the housing element of benefit) – likely to hit only large families in WM on highest AR Other risks to rental income Non dependant deductions –reasonable to assume most at risk household types will be Lone Parents and Multi-Adults with children at aged 32yrs plus (children will then be aged 16yrs+). Under occupancy – from April 2013, introduction of size criteria for working age social tenants (exist within PRS now). HB for property size you would be entitled to if on w/l not property size you are in. Reasonable to assume most at risk will be LP & MA+C with 2 beds or more aged 40+ (children more likely to have left home). Localism bill - Proposes shift of power from central govt to local people, new freedoms and flexibilities for local govt New rights and powers for communities and individuals Concerns for double dip recession receding - but …. economic situation still hugely challenging – slow growth, high inflation – Unemployment levels rising (small dip this month) and concern pte sector growth will not provide enough new jobs to compensate for public sector Lending still very tight – mortgage availability constrained high deposits and low loan to value required – low interest rates and falling house prices
  • Through indirect employment and expenditure on development, maintenance and other activities, delivers to the local economy a greater contribution than the (estimated £266 million in 2008) through direct employment. Examples of broad range of activities housing associations are involved in: Making adult skills a priority; Enabling wider access to information and communications technology; Getting people into work; Assisting welfare to work; Keeping money in the neighbourhood; Supporting and promoting enterprise; Tackling anti-social behaviour; Developing the role of neighbourhood wardens; Giving quality and choice in lettings; Reducing neighbourhood abandonment; Using art and sport in regeneration; Building community capacity; Helping community groups to get resources; Involving community groups in service delivery; Working with schools to develop wider action; Supporting families; Bringing shops back to deprived areas; Improving access to financial services; Joining-up neighbourhood management; Co-ordinating services for young people.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Jobs, Skills and Enterprise – a new future Elaine Browne and Paul Taylor Skills , Work and Enterprise A New Future
    • 2. 4 Game Changers Economy Generation Y the and Ageing Population Technology Welfare Reform
    • 3. <ul><ul><li>Prof. Ernesto Sorelli: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Right now, in your community, at this very moment, there is someone who is dreaming about doing something to improve his/her lot. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If we could learn how to help that person to transform the dream into meaningful work, we would be halfway to changing the economic fortunes of the entire community” </li></ul></ul>
    • 4. In the UK
    • 5. New Service Economy <ul><li>Reconfigured relationships. </li></ul><ul><li>Mash-up business models. </li></ul><ul><li>Consumer increasingly powerful. </li></ul><ul><li>Innovation is a key differentiator. </li></ul><ul><li>Convenience &amp; Quality expected. </li></ul>http://media.economist.com/images/20050402/1405LD1.jpg
    • 6. <ul><li>Global relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Sourcing ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Co-creation </li></ul><ul><li>Recruitment </li></ul><ul><li>Building relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Community engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Networked business models </li></ul>New networks Source: The GFF Pulse expert panel survey
    • 7. Life expectancy climbing <ul><li>Men born in 1985 can expect to live to 91 …all existing projections are too low. </li></ul><ul><li>Upper forecast - 97. </li></ul><ul><li>Cass Business School - 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>Those with access to advanced technologies can expect a healthy life beyond 120 years Institute for Alternative Futures </li></ul>
    • 8. And we’re living longer lives <ul><li>Human life expectancies have the potential to reach 500, or possibly even 1000. </li></ul><ul><li>“ The first person to live to 1,000 might be 60 already” </li></ul>Dr. Aubrey de Grey B.A., M.A. and Ph.D., University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. Born 20 th April 1963 -
    • 9. New era of mass communication <ul><li>Today&apos;s Internet has 1.73 bn users.  Internet World Stats. </li></ul><ul><li>World population is 6.7 bn people. </li></ul><ul><li>By 2020 Internet will have 5 bn users National Science Foundation in the U.S for one predicts </li></ul><ul><li>Utility of the internet is deepening at a faster rate. </li></ul><ul><li>By 2012 the internet will be 75 times its size in 2000 with over 400 times the traffic due to the rise of online video. </li></ul><ul><li>Most will access internet via mobile by 2020,’ Mark Walsh, December 15 th 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.mediapost.com/publications/?fa=Articles.showArticle&amp;art_aid=96642 </li></ul><ul><li>http://networks.silicon.com/webwatch/0,39024667,39193696,00.htm </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.siliconrepublic.com/news/article/11665/comms/telecoms-industry-sees-opportunity-in-tough-times </li></ul>
    • 10. The digital divide <ul><li>Half of social tenants never used the internet </li></ul><ul><li>Half of those not online are also classed as disabled </li></ul>
    • 11. Problems of digital exclusion <ul><li>Offline households miss out on £560 savings annually </li></ul><ul><li>90% of new jobs require ICT skills </li></ul><ul><li>Estimated that 60-70% of education and work related opportunities were advertised online only last year </li></ul>
    • 12. But…… <ul><li>Over 70% of those in in lowest income decile own a mobile phone </li></ul><ul><li>Amongst age range 16-39 – mobile phone ownership – even in lowest decile – ranges from 96% to multiple device. </li></ul>
    • 13. 96% of them have joined a social network Gen Y’ers at university spend longer on social networks than in lectures
    • 14. In the UK
    • 15. Vision Realise Untapped Potential in All Mission Develop that Talent Action Match that Talent to Opportunities
    • 16. Opportunities 4 Employment <ul><li>Bid For By Managers </li></ul><ul><li>Recruited by Colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>Paid for by Bromford </li></ul>
    • 17. More Powerful PR than Inside Housing
    • 18. &nbsp;
    • 19. Identifying the right skills
    • 20. &nbsp;
    • 21. Fast Food Skills Development
    • 22. A New Customer Deal
    • 23. &nbsp;
    • 24. Talent Management as mainstream service offer
    • 25. <ul><li>‘ A social enterprise is a business with clear societal objectives that trades to generate income. </li></ul><ul><li>Surpluses are reinvested back into the business or in the community, rather than being driven by the need to maximise profit for shareholders and owners.&apos; </li></ul>Background What is a Social Enterprise ?
    • 26. Housing Associations and Social Enterprise
    • 27. Housing Associations and Social Enterprise <ul><li>Housing Associations in general function along the lines of Social Enterprises. </li></ul><ul><li>They operate as businesses but have an explicit social purpose. </li></ul>Measured through Social Accounts, Social Impact Measurement, Social Return on Investment
    • 28. Not for Profit More than Profit For Profit
    • 29. Background What makes a Social Enterprise distinctive? Firstly they are fundamentally businesses - directly involved in producing goods or providing services to a market. They have explicit aims that benefit their workforce, local community or other groups, such as job creation, training or the providing of local services .
    • 30. Social Leadership
    • 31. Case Study – From Closed Shop to Start Up Business
    • 32. Turning idea’s upside down 1872 2002
    • 33. 4 Game Changers Economy Generation Y the and Ageing Population Technology Welfare Reform
    • 34. Keep in touch and share what we all do next Skills , Work and Enterprise A New Future [email_address] [email_address]

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