Open Licensing Requirements - Unraveling the Mystery
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Open Licensing Requirements - Unraveling the Mystery

on

  • 777 views

Presentation for Faculty and Staff Workshop on Development of Online Courses and Use of NANSLO Labs ...

Presentation for Faculty and Staff Workshop on Development of Online Courses and Use of NANSLO Labs

June 13-14, 2013
Boulder, Colorado

for DOL TAACCCT round 2 grantee the Consortium for Healthcare Education Online (CHEO)

Statistics

Views

Total Views
777
Views on SlideShare
777
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
8
Comments
1

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Here is an example of an educational textbook that is publicly available under the CC BY license. If you click on the CC BY icon or the linked text, it will take you to..
  • This license deed. This is a human readable summary of the rights the creator (also known as the licensor) has given to the public, and the conditions that the user of the work (also known as the licensee) must abide by in order to use the work. You can see that the deed clearly states that you are free to share and remix the work as long as you provide attribution.
  • Of course, Creative Commons offers more than one CC license -- there are six! But the only one you have to worry about for the purposes of the TAACCCT grant is the CC BY license.
  • The CC BY license is especially designed for the Internet age. I showed you the human-readable summary of the license in the last slide, but what about the license itself?
  • *But since most of us are not lawyers, we also make the licenses available in a format that normal people can read and understand. * The Commons deed, also known as the “human readable” version of the license, summarizes the most important terms and conditions of the CC BY license into non-technical language. * We can think of the commons deed as the user-friendly interface to the Legal Code beneath.
  • * At base, the license itself is a traditional legal tool, with the kind of language and text formats that lawyers know and love. We call this the legal code layer of each license, which has been vetted by a global team of legal experts. * This is what makes CC BY enforceable in a court of law.
  • * The final layer of the license design is the machine-readable metadata. This is what really makes the CC license viable for the Internet age. This small snippet of HTML code summarizes the CC BY license and associated metadata (such as who the work is authored by) into a format that software, search engines, and other kinds of technology can understand. * When you use our license chooser tool, you receive this snippet of HTML code, which you can copy and paste into your webpage.
  • Here is what our license chooser tool looks like. It is located at creativecommons dot org slash choose.
  • When you copy and paste the resulting html code into a web page, you get this icon and text. It’s that easy for anyone to add the CC license to their website.
  • So by fulfilling the CC BY grant requirement, you are joining a global open education movement dedicated to furthering universal access to education.
  • The OER movement is truly a global movement. All of these initiatives, and more, are using CC licenses to share their educational materials with the world. Including more popular initiatives you may have heard about...
  • Technical includes open file formats and Ensuring findability, reusability, remixability
  • Another FAQ: What if we incorporate other OER into our materials? How do we give them credit?
  • Well here’s a simple example of how Openstax college did it. They culled together different OER and made it into a textbook called Introduction to Sociology.
  • At the end of the textbook they give credit for all the different pieces. You can see that it’s as simple as a title, link to the original content, name of the author, and a link to the CC license of the original content.

Open Licensing Requirements - Unraveling the Mystery Presentation Transcript

  • 1. PAUL STACEYExcept where otherwise noted these materialsare licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY)Open Licensing Requirements – Unraveling the MysteryOpen Wires by Libby Levi (CC BY-SA)DOL TAACCCT Consortium for Healthcare Education Online (CHEO)Faculty & Staff Workshop on Development of Online Courses & Use of NANSLO LabsJune 13-14, 2013, Boulder, Colorado
  • 2. • All successful applicants must allow broad access for others to use andenhance project products and offerings, including authorizing for-profitderivative uses of the courses and associated learning materials bylicensing newly developed materials produced with grant funds with aCreative Commons Attribution License (CC BY).• This license allows subsequent users to copy, distribute, transmit andadapt the copyrighted work and requires such users to attribute thework in the manner specified by the Grantee.• The purpose of the CCBY licensing requirement is to ensure thatmaterials developed with funds provided by these grants result in Workthat can be freely reused and improved by others.SGA Requirements
  • 3. • Work that must be licensed under the CC BY includes both new contentcreated with the grant funds and modifications made to pre-existing,grantee-owned content using grant funds.• Only work that is developed by the grantee with the grant funds is required tobe licensed under the CC BY license. Pre-existing copyrighted materialslicensed to, or purchased by the grantee from third parties, includingmodifications of such materials, remain subject to the intellectual propertyrights the grantee receives under the terms of the particular license orpurchase. In addition, works created by the grantee without grant funds donot fall under the CC BY license requirement.• The Department will ensure that deliverables developed with these funds arepublicly available.SGA Requirements
  • 4. Flickr image by Colleen Simon CC BY-SA
  • 5. Our vision is nothing less than realizing the full potential of the Internet – universal access to research,education, & full participation in culture, driving a new era of development, growth, & productivity.Develops, supports, & stewards legal and technical infrastructure that maximizes digital creativity, sharing, & innovation.
  • 6. Galleries, Libraries, Archives & Museumshttp://openglam.org/Open AccessOpen DataOpen Textbooks
  • 7. http://www.creativecommons.org
  • 8. With the CC BY license, you retain yourcopyright, while granting some uses ofyour work.
  • 9. CC BY grants the public permission to copy, distribute,perform, display, and build upon your work, as long as theygive you credit for your work.
  • 10. Credit is also known as attribution, and all CC licensesrequire attribution.
  • 11. Here is an example of an educational textbook that is publicly available under the CCBY license. If you click on the CC BY icon or the linked text, it will take you to..
  • 12. Creative Commons License Features
  • 13. The Licenses
  • 14. CC licenses are unique becausethey are expressed in three ways.
  • 15. HumanReadableDeed
  • 16. LawyerReadableLegal Code
  • 17. <span xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#"xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"><span rel="dc:type" href="http://purl.org/dc/dcmitype/Text" property="dc:title">MyPhoto</span> by <a rel="cc:attributionURL"property="cc:attributionName"href="http://joi.ito.com/my_photo">Joi Ito</a>is licensed under a<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/">Creative CommonsAttribution 3.0 License</a>.<span rel="dc:source"href="http://fredbenenson.com/photo"/>Permissions beyond the scope of this license may beavailable at <a rel="cc:morePermissions"href="http://ozmo.com/revenue_sharing_agreement">OZMO</a>.</span></span><span xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#"xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"><span rel="dc:type" href="http://purl.org/dc/dcmitype/Text" property="dc:title">MyPhoto</span> by <a rel="cc:attributionURL"property="cc:attributionName"href="http://joi.ito.com/my_photo">Joi Ito</a>is licensed under a<a rel="license" href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/">Creative CommonsAttribution 3.0 License</a>.<span rel="dc:source"href="http://fredbenenson.com/photo"/>Permissions beyond the scope of this license may beavailable at <a rel="cc:morePermissions"href="http://ozmo.com/revenue_sharing_agreement">OZMO</a>.</span></span>MachineReadableMetadata
  • 18. http://creativecommons.org/choose
  • 19. <a rel="license"href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/"><imgalt="Creative Commons License" style="border-width:0"src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by/3.0/88x31.png"/></a><br />This work is licensed under a <a rel="license"href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/">Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License</a>.vThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution3.0 Unported License._______________________________________________________________
  • 20. http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Markinghttp://openattribute.com
  • 21. Open Access
  • 22. OER are teaching, learning, and research resourcesthat reside in the public domain or have beenreleased under an open license that permits theirfree use and re-purposing by others.Open educational resources include full courses andsupplemental resources such as textbooks, images,videos, animations, simulations, assessments, …Core ConceptOER are learning materials freely available undera license that allows you to:•Reuse•Revise•Remix•Redistribute
  • 23. CCBY“Atlas,it’stimeforyourbath”Woodleywonderworkshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/wwworks/440672445/in/photostream/
  • 24. Purpose1. Share development costs of learning resources among institutions2. Quality improvements through collaboration, visibility, creativity, andcritical thinking3. Save time and effort through the reusing and remixing of resources4. Pedagogical innovations5. Lower costs to students6. Open accessibility of resources to previously excluded groups7. New partnerships and market opportunities“to ensure that materials developed with funds provided by thesegrants result in work that can be freely reused and improved byothers.”Potential
  • 25. Realizing the Potential1. Sourcing OER2. Evaluating OER3. Reusing, revising, remixing OER4. Creating OER open policy5. Designing OER6. Authoring OER7. Quality OER (academic, technical, pedagogical)8. Technology & process for storage, curation, and distribution9. Combining open content with “open” pedagogies10. Promoting and marketing open to students11. Putting in place inter-institutional OER frameworks and agreements12. Leveraging OER by establishing downstream local, regional,national, and international partners & users13. Measuring outcomes
  • 26. http://open4us.org/find-oerSourcing OER
  • 27. What if we incorporate other OER intoour materials? How do we give themcredit?Reusing, revising, remixing OER
  • 28. Creating OER open policyCalifornia and BC legislation for Open TextbooksUNESCO Paris OER DeclarationUNESCO OER Policy Document
  • 29. Technology & process for storage, curation, anddistribution“The Department will ensure that deliverables developedwith these funds are publicly available.”TAACCCT solution TBDSGA Languagehttp://cnx.orghttp://cnx.orgExamples:
  • 30. Leveraging OER by establishing downstream local,regional, national, and international partners & users68%51%44%40%28%23%DOL TAACCCT Round 1 Data Analysis by Paul Stacey 20-Feb-2013
  • 31. Paul StaceyCreative Commonsweb site: http://creativecommons.orge-mail: pstacey@creativecommons.orgblog: http://edtechfrontier.compresentation slides: http://www.slideshare.net/Paul_StaceyQ&A