The Common Good:   a three-hour activity introducing social enterprise
 
09.00  Introduction to Social Enterprise 09.20  Ideas for solutions to social/   environmental problems 09.40  Promote ide...
What do these organisations have in common?
© David Loftus
What is a social enterprise?
“ I made a list of people who needed just a little bit of money. And when the list was complete, there were 42 names. The ...
 
“ The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. T...
Social enterprise in summary "A social enterprise is a business with primarily social objectives whose surpluses are ...
<ul><li>Trading for a social or environmental purpose </li></ul><ul><li>“ Double/triple bottom line” re-investing </li></u...
So, why could you run a social enterprise and why should other people do business with you?
09.00  Introduction to Social Enterprise 09.20  Ideas for solutions to social/   environmental problems 09.40  Promote ide...
Things you need to think about <ul><li>Is it clear what the idea is? </li></ul><ul><li>What would generate income? </li></...
If we were to ask … What are the attributes that would be valuable to successful social enterprises and/or social entrepre...
 
 
<ul><li>http://unltd.org.uk/hefce/  - UnLtd ‘Dare to be different: HE Social Entrepreneurship Awards’ </li></ul><ul><li>ht...
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Social enterprise common good presentation

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The presentation for introducing social enterprise to researchers, getting them to think about solving problems and thinking about how it could delivered using a social enterprise model. Also gets them to think about the "why" of a big idea, practise persuading others using that as a starting point

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  • If there has not been an opportunity to introduce social enterprise to participants, it is recommended that a video clip produced by the Social Enterprise Mark company be shown. http://www.socialenterprisemark.org.uk/showreel/ (used with permission) It is less than two minutes in length and gets across the main facts and figures relating to social enterprise in the UK. Alternatively you can use the ‘what is social enterprise video’ from www.vitae.ac.uk/socialenterprise
  • Images used with permission ‘ Fifteen’ – This venture offers to young people, often in need of a break in life, the experience of learning to work in the restaurant business in a pioneering apprenticeship scheme that was first featured in a television programme entitled ‘Jamie’s Kitchen’. The Fifteen restaurants serve food of the highest quality made from the best ingredients: their kitchens are where the apprentices learn their trade, and their profits are ploughed back into the programme. There are currently four Fifteen restaurants, London, Cornwall, Melbourne and Amsterdam. www.fifteen.net ‘ Eden Project’ - The Eden Project is a social enterprise; all revenues and profits are owned by its charitable arm, the Eden Trust, and are used to further the Trust&apos;s charitable ambitions and commitments. The Eden Project&apos;s social impact is multifaceted, and crucial to its financial activities. The principal aim of the enterprise is to raise awareness and knowledge of environmental and social issues. It has also, however, brought more than £800m into the Cornish economy because it sources services and supplies from local businesses (2500 of them) wherever possible. The project leads by example to show visitors how to live in a sustainable and ecologically sensitive way while promoting the study and appreciation of the environment, the advantages of renewable energy, biodegradable waste and agriculture conservation, and by providing employment opportunities in the area. www.edenproject.com ‘ Divine Chocolate’ - Just under half of the company is owned by the farmers in Ghana who provide the cocoa for Divine Chocolate and have representatives on the company‘s board. The cocoa growers are guaranteed a fair price for their cocoa beans as well as receiving a ‘social premium’ to be invested in community projects. They also receive 2% of the company’s turnover, as well as a dividend. www.divinechocolate.com You might like to also mention ‘The Big Issue’ - The Big Issue exists to offer homeless and vulnerably housed people the opportunity to earn a legitimate income by selling an entertainment and current affairs magazine to the general public offering ‘a hand up, not a hand out’ to the vendors. Often mistaken for ‘just a charity’, it seeks to provide a much wider network of support to its vendors and offer a high quality publication worthy of its cover price.
  • To answer this question concisely can be quite difficult. A tangible example of what is at the heart of social enterprise is exemplified by Professor Muhammad Yunus who was working as an academic at a university in Bangladesh during a time of extreme poverty and famine. The following quote and video clip should serve as an inspiration to all.
  • It is recommended that a video clip produced by the Skoll Foundation is shown at this point. The video is of Professor Muhammad Yunus, Grameen Bank and is titled ‘Social Entrepreneurs: Pioneering Social Change’ available at http://www.socialenterprisemark.org.uk/showreel/. It is recommended that the first 3 minutes of this video is shown to participants with the closing credits acknowledging the Skoll Foundation.
  • Social entrepreneurs are often taken to be mavericks as they typically drive ideas forward where others may only see barriers. In almost every example where a social enterprise has been established, many obstacles have been overcome to get the venture off the ground; problem solving and persistance are two essential qualities for successful social entrepreneurs.
  • This slide now focuses the attention on to the participants and any ideas they may have for solutions to social and/or environmental issues. The next section requires the facilitator to encourage all suggestions to motivate participants to volunteer ideas. As soon as two or three people have volunteered their ideas, encourage others to take a flip chart and note down their own. Allow 15 minutes or so for this, encouraging all the while. The next stage is to gather the flip charts and encourage those without their own ideas to join with those whose ideas they like or want to work on further by conducting a quick and fun ‘market’ of the ideas. There may be some ideas that fail to attract any supporters, or it may be appropriate to combine two or more similar ideas into one big idea.
  • Whilst participants are developing their ideas and preparing a one-page flip chart poster; encourage them to consider the above questions as part of the process. The emphasis should be on great ideas that are sustainable. At the end of this process, there will be an opportunity for participants to view each other’s posters and vote for the one they think is the best. Voting: It has been found that allowing participants two voting slips, one that they could use to vote for their own idea and one that must be used to vote for another idea is a reasonable way to counter balance the effect of big groups versus small ones.
  • Invite participants during the debrief to volunteer the attributes that successful social entrepreneurs might need. The following slide has a few suggestions set out as competences.
  • Why would academic researchers be interested in setting up a social enterprise? There is financial support and advice for the establishment of social enterprises from universities (see Unltd/HEFCE social entrepreneurship awards) Social enterprises tend to be community focused therefore are arguably the best example of universities and local community collaborative activity that epitomises the public engagement agenda At the heart of academic research is to find solutions to problems that have a benefit to society; social enterprises are tangible embodiments of this.
  • Social enterprise common good presentation

    1. 1. The Common Good: a three-hour activity introducing social enterprise
    2. 3. 09.00 Introduction to Social Enterprise 09.20 Ideas for solutions to social/ environmental problems 09.40 Promote ideas & group formation 09.50 Develop your idea & prepare poster 11.20 Poster session & seek support 11.50 Debrief 12.00 Close Session overview
    3. 4. What do these organisations have in common?
    4. 5. © David Loftus
    5. 6. What is a social enterprise?
    6. 7. “ I made a list of people who needed just a little bit of money. And when the list was complete, there were 42 names. The total amount of money they needed was $27. I was shocked.” Muhammad Yunus
    7. 9. “ The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man” George Bernard Shaw
    8. 10. Social enterprise in summary &quot;A social enterprise is a business with primarily social objectives whose surpluses are principally reinvested for that purpose in the business or in the community, rather than being driven by the need to maximise profit for shareholders and owners.”  Social Enterprise Action Plan 2006
    9. 11. <ul><li>Trading for a social or environmental purpose </li></ul><ul><li>“ Double/triple bottom line” re-investing </li></ul><ul><li>Passionate/”crazy” people who change things </li></ul><ul><li>Highly motivated problem solvers </li></ul><ul><li>Enhanced stakeholder engagement </li></ul>
    10. 12. So, why could you run a social enterprise and why should other people do business with you?
    11. 13. 09.00 Introduction to Social Enterprise 09.20 Ideas for solutions to social/ environmental problems 09.40 Promote ideas & group formation 09.50 Develop your idea & prepare poster 11.20 Poster session & seek support 11.50 Debrief 12.00 Close Session overview
    12. 14. Things you need to think about <ul><li>Is it clear what the idea is? </li></ul><ul><li>What would generate income? </li></ul><ul><li>Who would be the beneficiary of the enterprise? </li></ul><ul><li>Are the any relevant numbers? Do they make sense? </li></ul><ul><li>Which (research?) skills are being used? </li></ul>
    13. 15. If we were to ask … What are the attributes that would be valuable to successful social enterprises and/or social entrepreneurs?
    14. 18. <ul><li>http://unltd.org.uk/hefce/ - UnLtd ‘Dare to be different: HE Social Entrepreneurship Awards’ </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.socialenterprise.org.uk/ - Social Enterprise Coalition: the voice of social enterprise </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.clearlyso.com/ - ClearlySo: The global hub for social business, social enterprise and social investment </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.socialenterprisemark.org.uk/ - Social Enterprise Mark: Trading for people and planet </li></ul>Where can I find out more?

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