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Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)
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Under-appreciated and neglected urban transport policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport)

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Presentation to 6 May 2009 event in Singapore organised by the Land Transport Authority (LTA), the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Centre for Liveable Cities (CLC).

Presentation to 6 May 2009 event in Singapore organised by the Land Transport Authority (LTA), the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and the Centre for Liveable Cities (CLC).

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  • All photographs and diagrams are by Paul Barter except where otherwise specified. Please provide acknowledgement if you wish to re-use any of them.
  • Vuchic, V.R. (1999) Transportation for Livable Cities , New Brunswick: Center for Urban Policy Research.
  • Vuchic, V.R. (1999) Transportation for Livable Cities , New Brunswick: Center for Urban Policy Research.
  • Image from NTUC website: www.ntuc.org.sg/images/SeasonPass_image5.jpg
  • “ Transit can compete with car travel not by copying its door-to-door routing (which it can never match) but by providing opportunities for flexible travel throughout an integrated network with convenient, rapid transfers… … cities with the highest transit-riding habit… generally have transit systems with the highest transfer ratios …” Vukan Vuchic, 1999, pp. 209-210 Vuchic, V.R. (1999) Transportation for Livable Cities , New Brunswick: Center for Urban Policy Research.
  • Use a google map image of tampines area with circles drawn at 1 and 2 km
  • http://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/safety/motorist/images/inlineskaters.jpg
  • Can all fixed costs be saved by getting rid of car?
  • If something like the Swiss system is used then I envisage each dashboard would have a display of how many $ of tax remaining and how many km tax paid remaining . This would make the incentive to moderate driving very clear.
  • Commercial paid parking as norm These changes will make car ownership less attractive
  • Transport policy for livable cities should focus more on the competition between car-owning and car-free lifestyles
  • Transcript

    • 1. Under-appreciated and neglected policy opportunities (and reframing competition in urban transport) Dr Paul Barter Assistant Professor LKY School of Public Policy National University of Singapore [email_address]
    • 2. Some under-appreciated and neglected policy issues
      • Public transport integration and comprehensiveness
      • Short trips between 1 and 4 km
      • Taxis and car-sharing
      • Car ownership cost structures
      • Parking policy
      • What do they have in common?
    • 3. Public transport’s customers? Cartoon: GTZ Thailand
    • 4. Can public transport attract people who have alternatives? Does it take a rail system like Tokyo’s?
    • 5.
      • Simply a business? – sink or swim according to competition in the market?
      • Like a Utility? – necessary infrastructure, serving wider urban objectives
        • Welfare service? – only for those with no other options and for work trips to city centre?
        • Ambitiously comprehensive? - to serve wide range of people and trips? An alternative to cars?
      What kind of industry is public transport?
    • 6. Should public transport try to offer direct service? No!
      • Hub-and-spoke (or ‘trunk and feeder’) versus many-to-many:
        • More frequent with same resources (3 high-frequency lines versus 9 low-frequency lines)
        • Lower total travel time, despite transfers
        • Simple network: easily understood and remembered
    • 7. Aim to be a NETWORK. Don’t attempt to mimic car’s direct service
      • “ Transit can compete with car travel not by copying its door-to-door routing (which it can never match) but by providing opportunities for flexible travel throughout an integrated network with convenient, rapid transfers… ”
      • Vukan Vuchic, 1999, pp. 209-210
    • 8. Importance of frequent service
    • 9. Relatively simple grid-like network – one map can portray all metro, tram and bus lines
    • 10. Transfer-friendly networks for buses too?
      • “ Competently designed transit networks often consist of trunk lines with frequent service and separate feeders, even when both sections are served by buses…”
      • Vukan Vuchic, 1999, p. 210
    • 11. Importance of regular, frequent service
      • Hanoi and HCM City bus reforms
        • Regular service (10 min ‘turn-up-and-go headway) has revealed demand for bus travel in these cities of motorcycles
        • Season passes!
      • Indore in India similar success
    • 12. Buying a car creates commitment ...
      • Public transport can create customer commitment too
      • Example: ‘rainbow cards’ in Europe = season passes for unlimited public transport travel
    • 13. Urban Bus Regulat ion Categories Government takes responsibility for outcomes Compatible with ambitious integration Government takes little or no responsibility for outcomes Incompatible with integration Public monopolies Proactive planning with service contracts Well-regulated Franchises Passive franchises Deregulation
    • 14. Seoul’s 2004 ‘Semi-public’ bus reforms Public control, private provision suits ambitious integration Source: Kim, GC 2007 with permission
    • 15. Seoul’s 2004 bus reforms Source: Kim, GC 2007 with permission
      • The Trunk bus routes require high on-road priority (high-end BRT would be even better)
    • 16. Could public transport be even more ambitious?
      • Public transport CAN compete with cars
      • Requires regulatory arrangements compatible with high ambitions
      • Even humble buses can do much better than they usually do
      • Can public transport also compete with car ownership?
    • 17. Poor public transport forces private vehicle ownership. Excellent public transport makes low car ownership possible.
      • Car ownership and Melbourne’s rail network
      Source: Melbourne Atlas 2006 (State Government of Victoria, Department of Planning and Community Development) [http://www.dse.vic.gov.au/dse/dsenres.nsf/linkview/9ca360582b427fbfca2570ad007b7bc26edcd66e75635aadca2571bf00242532]
    • 18. To really compete with car ownership public transport needs help from its “friends”
      • Needs help to fill “mobility gaps”
        • Short(ish) trips between 1 and 4 km
        • Last kilometre
        • Major shopping
        • Luggage
        • Pets
        • etc
    • 19. Filling the short-trip gap
    • 20. Filling the short-trip gap (last kilometre)
    • 21. 2 km in 12 minutes (at a gentle 10 km/h)
    • 22. Personal Mobility Devices (Not oddities. Opportunities to help fill short-trip gap)
    • 23. Helping cycling (and PMDs) is NOT just about bike paths or bike lanes Source: London Cycling Design Standards book, p. 62
    • 24. Car-sharing: no need to own a car in order to access one when needed http://www.scwalkandroll.com/LibraryIndices/images/carsharing.gif http://i.treehugger.com/files/th_images/photo_ReservedParking.JPG
    • 25. Taxis and taxi-related policy: more important than usually perceived when we remember their role in filling mobility gaps
    • 26. 3 rd generation bicycle sharing and the short-trip gap
    • 27. Comprehensive multi-modal package to rival car ownership
      • ‘ Mobility Packages’ (Hannover) and ‘Mobility Hubs’ (Bremen) put transport services together in unexpected ways (see German mythical creature ‘egg-laying wool-milk sow’)
      Source: City of Bremen publicity materials
    • 28. Car access without owning one prompts a critical look at car ownership cost structures Fixed costs Variable costs Time of purchase 10 years Pay retail price, GST. Bid & pay for COE; Pay ARF, excise duty, registration fee Pay road tax yearly Monthly parking at home Vehicle inspection fees (year 3, 5, 7,9, 10, 11, 12, etc) ERP, fuel tax, parking at destinations, maintenance Scrap or renew COE for another 5 or 10 yrs Pay road tax yearly – higher rate for older cars Scrap & get rebate for next car COE, ARF value Insurance yearly time
    • 29. Possibility of excellent mobility without owning a car prompts a more critical look at car ownership
    • 30. Can we make cost structure for all cars more like car-sharing and taxis?
      • Cannot completely eliminate the ‘all you can eat car buffet’ and tendency for owned cars to be over-used
      • But “Pay as You Drive” (PAYD) pricing is coming:
          • Insurance
          • Mileage taxes and charges
          • Shifting fixed taxes and charges into usage charges
    • 31. Singapore could make all its fixed taxes PAYD (including COE!) Insurance yearly (but could also be made distance-based) Pay retail price + GST Fixed costs Variable costs Time of purchase 25,000km 75,000km 50,000km 2 years (moderate use) Bid & pay for 25,000km COE; Buy 25,000km worth of ARF, import duty, reg. fee, road tax New 25,000km COE at current price New 25,000km COE at current price Pay for new 25,000km block of other taxes New 25,000km block of other taxes 4 years (moderate use) Veh. inspection & fee ERP, fuel tax, parking fees, maintenance distance New 25,000km COE at current price New 25,000km block of other taxes Veh. inspection & fee
    • 32. Coming changes to parking policy will also change car cost structures
      • Demand-responsive prices for kerb parking
      • Deregulate supply of off-street parking
      • Encourage unbundling of parking (bundled parking involves cross-subsidies for parking and for car ownership)
      • Plan quality and location but not quantity of parking
    • 33. My central message today
      • Urban transport policy for liveable cities can and should dare to compete successfully with car ownership
      • Seeing the car-owning lifestyle as our primary competition expands and enriches our policy horizons
      • Imagining excellent mobility without owning a car prompts a more critical look at car ownership arrangements
    • 34. Thank you very much Paul Barter LKY School of Public Policy National University of Singapore [email_address]

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