Audio culture week 1 without sound

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Audio culture week 1 without sound

  1. 1. Audio CultureWeek One - Thursday 27th September
  2. 2. Hello!Justine Mortimer Paul Carter Paul Carter Paul Carter
  3. 3. Audio Culture is a 30 creditmodule which runs over two semesters
  4. 4. Learning OutcomesDemonstrate high level skills in digital audioproduction and dissemination;Understand and critically engage with the rolesrequired in digital audio production;Critically understand debates surrounding therole of audio in contemporary culture;Demonstrate an ability to critically analyseaudio products
  5. 5. Assessments Two assessments: One due in week one of Semester 2The other due in week 13 - after Easter
  6. 6. AssessmentsAssignment 1 - Portfolio consisting of four pieces ofwork - 50% of module mark Assignment 2 - Projectto be negotiated with module tutors - 50% of module mark
  7. 7. Assessment OneYou will analyse four given pieces of audio interms of production, audience and culturalcontext.At least two of the analyses should be in essayform of 1000 words, you are invited to exploremedia forms for the other analyses.Audio for analysis will be available in week nine.
  8. 8. Assessment OneYou will analyse four given pieces of audio interms of production, audience and culturalcontext.At least two of the analyses should be in essayform of 1000 words, you are invited to exploremedia forms for the other analyses.Audio for analysis will be available in week nine.
  9. 9. Assessment TwoYou will produce a significant piece of audioproduction the form and content of which will benegotiated with the tutors.Since production is rarely a individual enterprise,you may decide to take on a particular role in theproduction as part of a team.
  10. 10. Audio CultureIt’s all about sound and how we make it meaningful Historically different sounds have been the preserve of different academic disciplines
  11. 11. Noise
  12. 12. van Leeuwen (1999) suggests that increasingly weshould explore integration rather than specificity HoweverTo some extent it is important to understand thosespecificities before we begin to bring them together
  13. 13. So we will be thinking about sound in the context of . . . Radio; imaginative landscapes, discourse analysis, intimacy, replacing visual codes with auditory codes
  14. 14. So we will be thinking about sound in the context of . . . Music; the semiotics of music, noise, democratisation of technology, definitive codes vs deregulated contexts
  15. 15. So we will be thinking about sound in the context of . . . Film & Television; acoustic environments, affective functions QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  16. 16. So we will be thinking about sound in the context of . . . New Media; extending the possibilities of communicative ‘acts’, new semiotic possibilities (sound design) & collapsing boundaries
  17. 17. Sound as a ‘semiotic resource’
  18. 18. “sublime voice has been immortalised in music and literature” Ralph Vaugh Williams The Lark Ascending
  19. 19. FOcus on the Structured nature of sound in media texts
  20. 20. In analysis, we will ask, whoconstructed the text? For what purpose? In what context? In production, we will need to consider, for whom are we constructing the text? What ‘imaginative reaction’ are we looking for from the audience? What are the structures and expectations that might shape what we do?
  21. 21. The Nature of Sound
  22. 22. If a tree falls in a wood...
  23. 23. Sound is Omni-present
  24. 24. Sound is omni-directional
  25. 25. Human Hearing Young ears >16Hz - 20kHz
  26. 26. Human Voice Approx. 300Hz - 3kHz
  27. 27. Sound levels0dB - Threshold of hearing10dB - Quiet whisper30dB - Quiet street noise60dB - Normal conversation (from 2m)80dB - Loud street traffic (from 2m)100dB - Thunder110db - Rock Band (2m)130dB - Jet Aircraft (30m) - Threshold of pain
  28. 28. Ears can be Easily DamagedAuditory Fatigue - prolonged exposure to loud soundgives temporary desensitisationTinnitus - ringing in ears caused by very loud sound.Can become permanent.Permanent Threshold Shift - irreversible wearingdown of nerve endings
  29. 29. For next week...Go to the British Library Sounds collection at sounds.bl.uk and ... listen

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