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Documentary StylesBy Keilah Patten
Direct cinema   Produced in the 1960s   No narrator   Fly-on-the-wall documentary   Documentaries did not include any ...
MockumentaryRecorded as if it were a normal documentary but the  people and events involved are made up for comic  affect....
Direct cinema   Produced in the 1960s   No narrator   Fly-on-the-wall documentary   Documentaries did not include any ...
Video diaryThis is where the main character records themselves  and talks to the camera as if they were having a  normal c...
Drama documentary   The clips shown are all made up and scripted, so    that they can get a serious point across.   They...
Theatrical documentariesThese are documentaries that are released into cinemas as  films. One of the well-known examples o...
Public affair documentaries   A weekly example of this is Panorama; this weekly one hour    program gets across social pr...
Cinema Verite:   Also commonly used in the 1960s   This is style of documentary uses a hand-held    camera. Commonly use...
Docusoaps   Seen through the eyes of the public   They are called Docu-soaps because of their    similarity to soap oper...
Continued … Usually have a voice-over, done by a well-  known actor. Based on everyday issues and problems. Some of the...
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Documentary styles

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Transcript of "Documentary styles"

  1. 1. Documentary StylesBy Keilah Patten
  2. 2. Direct cinema Produced in the 1960s No narrator Fly-on-the-wall documentary Documentaries did not include any interviews No rehearsals before they started filming. None of the events involved were staged No film lights used for artificial light No dissolve edits used.
  3. 3. MockumentaryRecorded as if it were a normal documentary but the people and events involved are made up for comic affect. Often used to comment on present events or to make a point in a comical manner. Although they are usually comical, they don’t have to be, that can be made in a dramatic manner instead. Parody of life or the genre.
  4. 4. Direct cinema Produced in the 1960s No narrator Fly-on-the-wall documentary Documentaries did not include any interviews No rehearsals before they started filming. None of the events involved were staged No film lights used for artificial light No dissolve edits used.
  5. 5. Video diaryThis is where the main character records themselves and talks to the camera as if they were having a normal conversation with another person. They usually do this so they can get their feelings and thoughts across.Comes from direct cinema, the audience builds a relationship with the individual telling the story.
  6. 6. Drama documentary The clips shown are all made up and scripted, so that they can get a serious point across. They usually help show social issues or help to point out the problems or miscarriage of justice. Well-known examples of this are Roots or Ghandi.
  7. 7. Theatrical documentariesThese are documentaries that are released into cinemas as films. One of the well-known examples of these types of documentaries is ‘Supersize Me’.Usually has a narrator on screen that helps to move the film along, for example Supersize Me had narrator Morgan Spurlock.The commentary is usually scripted, facts and opinion are given by the narrator.
  8. 8. Public affair documentaries A weekly example of this is Panorama; this weekly one hour program gets across social problems to the audience giving every side of the story. Usually shows something that is wrong within the community, drawing attention to social problems. Shown by public service broadcasting channels, e.g. BBC 1.
  9. 9. Cinema Verite: Also commonly used in the 1960s This is style of documentary uses a hand-held camera. Commonly used in fictional films. Invented by Jean Rouch Sometimes called ‘observational cinema’. Usually the subject and audience involved are seen to not know that the camera is there.
  10. 10. Docusoaps Seen through the eyes of the public They are called Docu-soaps because of their similarity to soap operas e.g. fast editing, Multi- strand narratives, usually part of a series and usually ends in a cliff-hanger. Are based around giving entertainment to the to audience. Usually have characters that the audience find more and more out about, like a soap opera.
  11. 11. Continued … Usually have a voice-over, done by a well- known actor. Based on everyday issues and problems. Some of the scenes involved are known to be set-up.
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