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Lesson 16   Religion
 

Lesson 16 Religion

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    Lesson 16   Religion Lesson 16 Religion Presentation Transcript

    • Religion in the United States
    • Terms (p. 217)
      • Roman Catholics – originated from the teachings of Jesus Christ
        • The early Roman Empire spread this religion throughout Europe
      • Protestants – disagree with some of the beliefs of the Catholic Church
        • You can see the word “protest” the name
        • This Protestants also believe in Christ but separated from the Catholic Church during the Reformation
      • Orthodox – a form of Christianity that developed in Eastern Europe
      • Jews – originated from the followers of Abraham and his sons
        • Follow the Old Testament of the Bible
    • Statistics – Religious Groups in the U.S.
      • Christian: (78.5%)
        • Protestant (51.3%)
        • Roman Catholic (23.9%)
        • Mormon (1.7%)
        • other Christian (1.6%)
      • unaffiliated (12.1%)
      • none (4%)
      • other or unspecified (2.5%)
      • Jewish (1.7%)
      • Buddhist (0.7%)
      • Muslim (0.6%)
    • Religious Persecution
      • Persecution - a program or campaign to exterminate, drive away, or subjugate a people because of their religion, race, or beliefs (from dictionary.com)
      • Basically, many European governments were trying to unify their country with one religion
        • Others that did not believe in this religion could be punished or even killed
    • Beginnings in American History
      • Many people came to America in the 17 th for “religious freedom”
      • 1620 – Plymouth, Massachusetts (p. 218)
        • A group of “Puritans” settle in the United States
        • The Puritans were against the Church of England
      • Pennsylvania was settled by the Quakers
      • Maryland was settled by Roman Catholics
      • In seeing these three examples, one can find the beginnings of a strong religious influence in America
    • Government
      • "no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States“
        • From Article Six of the Constitution
      • "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof“
        • 1 st Amendment of the Constitution (p. 222)
    • Does religion and government mix?
      • With the drafting of the Constitution , the United States became one of the first countries to enact “freedom of religion”
        • separation of church and state
      • This phrase can often be misleading because many voters may base their decisions on a candidate’s religious views.
    • Voters
      • Every President , with the exception of John F. Kennedy (a Roman Catholic), was raised in a family with affiliations with Protestant Christianity.
      • In the 2004 Presidential election, George W. Bush, a Methodist, earned a slim victory over John Kerry
        • with voters who cited "moral values" (a term among religious voters) playing an important part in the election (an MSN poll)
      • A Gallup Poll released in 2007 [48] indicated that 53% of Americans would refuse to vote for an atheist as president
      • From the polls we just looked at, we can see that although religion isn’t a requirement to enter political office, but it can affect voters and their decisions in electing the president
    • Emergence of New Churches in America
      • Many African-American slaves were converted to Christianity in the 18 th century (p. 218)
        • Many were treated badly by other white believers
        • Many blacks started their own churches
      • African Methodist Episcopal Church
        • A large all-black Methodist organization
      • There are also many African-American Baptist churches
    • New Churches (cont.)
      • Mormons (p. 219)
      • Joseph Smith Jr.
        • Founded the Mormon faith in 1830
        • Claimed to have spoken to God
          • Told him to restore the early Christian faith
      • Early Mormons faced much persecution
        • Moved from New York to Ohio to Illinois
        • Many Mormons finally settled in Utah under the leadership of Brigham Young
    • New Churches (cont.)
      • Christian Science (p. 219)
      • Mrs. Mary Baker Eddy founded this Church in 1879 (Based on an event in 1866)
        • Other Christian groups disagree with some of the beliefs of this Church
          • One example is the idea of healing through prayer
          • Christian Scientists do not believe in modern medicine
    • How Religious is the United States?
      • A Gallop survey stated the 41% of Americans regularly go to church services
        • 15% of French citizens attend
        • 10% of British citizens attend
      • Other polls put this number at 26% or less
        • From a Harris survey in 2003 and 2006
    • The Bible Belt
      • Religious influence is especially strong in the southern states
    • The Bible Belt
      • The term Bible Belt is used informally by journalists, who suggest that the region allows religion to influence politics, science, and education.
      • Many people living in this region are regarded as “conservative”
    • Radical Groups
      • Cult - a religion or sect considered to be false, unorthodox, or extremist, with members often living outside of conventional society under the direction of a charismatic leader
      • This word is often linked to smaller religious groups
      • This term is often used in a negative way
    • Strange Cults in U.S. History
      • The People’s Temple (p. 223)
        • Founded in 1955 by Jim Jones
        • Wanted to help the sick, homeless and jobless of all races
        • His ideas spread greatly in California
      • Moved his followers to Guyana in 1974
        • By 1978 over 900 people lived in Jonestown
      • A Congressman, Leo Ryan and journalists came to investigate the community
        • Many people wanted to leave with Ryan
        • Security Guards killed Ryan, 3 journalists and another trying to escape
      • On November 18 th , Jones ordered his members to drink a poison
        • In all 918 people died
        • Jones shot himself
      • The Branch Davidians
        • A group formed in 1955
      • In 1981, David Koresh became the leader of this movement
        • Believed the world would soon come to an end
        • Taught his followers that the U.S. government was an enemy of the group
      • In 1993 the government accused the Davidians of having illegal weapons (Waco, Texas)
        • Government law enforcement laid siege to their compound for 51 days
        • They later raided the compound, but Koresh set fire to the compound
        • 82 people died in both the fighting and the fire
      • “ The Manson Family”
      • Charles Manson was the leader of this cult
        • Believed there would be a large-scale race war in the United States
        • Manson thought he and his “family” would then be able to rule the world
      • Manson sent many of his followers on a killing spree
        • 9 people were killed