The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity         for Water and Wetlands                  A contribution to Rio + 20   ...
TEEB For Water and WetlandsPresentation overview                           1.   TEEB & The TEEB for Water and             ...
TEEB’s Genesis, Aims and progress                 G8+5                     “Potsdam Initiative – Biological Diversity 2010...
TEEB For Water and WetlandsCritical issues       The “nexus” among water, food and energy has been     recognised as one o...
TEEB For Water and Wetlands     “I believe that the great part of miseries of mankind are    brought upon them by false es...
TEEB For Water and WetlandsCritical issues – the need to appreciate the values of W&WThe value of biodiversity and ecosyst...
TEEB Water and Wetlands project             • Aim to demonstrate the multiple benefits               of water and wetlands...
TEEB For Water and Wetlands                  1.   TEEB & The TEEB for Water and                       Wetlands Project    ...
2. Wetlands & ecosystem services• Water and wetland related ecosystem services (ESS)•       Water services essential for w...
Evidence base - Assessing values and actionsAssessing the value of working with natural capital has helped determine where...
TEEB For Water and Wetlands                  1.   TEEB & The TEEB for Water and                       Wetlands Project    ...
TEEB For Water and Wetlands3 Measuring to manage better • A diverse range of tools help identify, demonstrate and take acc...
Taking account of public goods …can change what is the “right” decision on land/resource use  US$ Based only on private ga...
TEEB For Water and WetlandsValuation of ESS from Kampala wetlands, UgandaServices provided by the Nakivubo swamp include n...
TEEB For Water and Wetlands                  1.   TEEB & The TEEB for Water and                       Wetlands Project    ...
TEEB For Water and Wetlands 4. Integrating the values of water and wetlands into decision making• Policy synergies: Workin...
TEEB For Water and Wetlands ‘We never know the worth of water til the well is dry’.      ‘                                ...
Hydrological services: Aquifer recharge;                                                                   Improved surfac...
Multiple Objectives : PSAH Mexico                                           AquifersBalance of priorities varied over time...
TEEB For Water and Wetlands                  1.   TEEB & The TEEB for Water and                       Wetlands Project    ...
TEEB For Water and Wetlands5. Working recommendations: Transforming our approachto water and wetlandsThere is a need to pu...
TEEB For Water and Wetlands     The water-related investment challenge• Total costs of replacing aging water supply and sa...
Working for Water (WfW): SAThe Manalana wetland (near Bushbuckridge, Mpumalanga)Restoration within wider PES scheme       ...
TEEB For Water and Wetlands                  1.   TEEB & The TEEB for Water and                       Wetlands Project    ...
TEEB For Water and WetlandsNext Steps                                                             …is this enough to work ...
TEEB For Water and WetlandsPanel questions & discussionQ1: What are the key benefits of water and wetlands? And whichare e...
Thank you                TEEB Reports available on http://www.teebweb.org/                               See also www.teeb...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Patrick ten Brink of IEEP TEEB Water and Wetlands introduction 15 june 2012

1,151

Published on

Patrick ten Brink of IEEP TEEB Water and Wetlands introduction 15 june 2012 presentation at Rio+20

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,151
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Patrick ten Brink of IEEP TEEB Water and Wetlands introduction 15 june 2012

  1. 1. The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity for Water and Wetlands A contribution to Rio + 20 Patrick ten Brink TEEB for Policy Makers Co-ordinator Head of Brussels Office Institute for European Environmental Policy (IEEP) TEEB for Water and Wetlands side event 13:30 to 15:00 Pavilion 3, Room 6 Rio de Janeiro, 15th June 2012
  2. 2. TEEB For Water and WetlandsPresentation overview 1. TEEB & The TEEB for Water and Wetlands Project 2. Water and wetlands: what benefits do we derive and what do we risk losing? 3. Measuring to manage better 4. Integrating the values of water and wetlands into decision making 5. Working recommendations: Transforming our approach to water and wetlands 6. Next Steps & Panel questions
  3. 3. TEEB’s Genesis, Aims and progress G8+5 “Potsdam Initiative – Biological Diversity 2010” Potsdam 1) The economic significance of the global loss of biological diversity Importance of recognising, demonstrating & responding to values of nature Engagement: ~500 authors, reviewers & cases from across the globe TEEB End User Reports Brussels Interim Climate TEEB W&W 2009, London 2010 TEEB Report Issues Update Nature & GE TEEB Books TEEB Oceans SynthesisEcol./Env.Economicsliterature CBD COP 9 Input to Bonn 2008 UNFCCC 2009 India, Brazil, Belgium, Japan & South Africa Sept. 2010 TEEB studies The Netherlands, BD COP 10 Germany, Nordics, Nagoya, Oct 2010 Norway, India, Brazil
  4. 4. TEEB For Water and WetlandsCritical issues The “nexus” among water, food and energy has been recognised as one of the most fundamental relationships and challenges for society. Biodiversity and particularly wetland ecosystems are increasingly understood to be at the core of this nexus. Indeed water and wetlands are the foundation of the economic and environmental wellbeing of humanity across the globe.
  5. 5. TEEB For Water and Wetlands “I believe that the great part of miseries of mankind are brought upon them by false estimates they have made of the value of things.” Benjamin Franklin, 1706-1790"We are living in a water “bubble” as unsustainable and fragile asthat which precipitated the collapse in global financial markets",concluding that "We are now on the verge of water bankruptcy" 2009 World Economic Forum
  6. 6. TEEB For Water and WetlandsCritical issues – the need to appreciate the values of W&WThe value of biodiversity and ecosystem services are not fully reflected in themarkets, in price signals, policies and investment decisions Decision making (at company, policy & citizen level) still too often fails to take into account the local to global benefits, contributing to a loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Assessing ecosystem service benefits (and links to biodiversity and ecosystem functions) and identifying who benefits from what natural capital is critical for policy focus, interest and instrument choice, design and implementation. There is a need to improve the economic signals to help take the values of nature into account – in positive incentives and in reforming incentives harmful to the environment – as well as regulatory and governance solutions. This requires action at all governance levels + mainstreaming nature’s values. There is a need to assess, demonstrate and communicate both the intrinsic value of nature and the wide range of benefits provided to people, society and the economy
  7. 7. TEEB Water and Wetlands project • Aim to demonstrate the multiple benefits of water and wetlands • Communicate the values - at Rio+20, Ramsar COP11 (Bucharest, July 2012), IUCN World Congress (Jeju, September 2012) and CBD COP11 (Hyderabad, October 2012) • Engage wider community to share evidence on the multiple values of W&S • Engage with decision makers - to understand what instruments can respond to the value of W&W • Stimulate research and commitment to action
  8. 8. TEEB For Water and Wetlands 1. TEEB & The TEEB for Water and Wetlands Project 2. Water and wetlands: what benefits do we derive and what do we risk losing? 3. Measuring to manage better 4. Integrating the values of water and wetlands into decision making 5. Working recommendations: Transforming our approach to water and wetlands 6. Next Steps & Panel questions
  9. 9. 2. Wetlands & ecosystem services• Water and wetland related ecosystem services (ESS)• Water services essential for wellbeing, society, economy• Wetlands essential for the water cycle• Meeting sustainable water management objectives cost effectively via Wetlands ecosystem services.• Ecosystem services from Wetlands – multiple benefits• Impacts of wetlands degradation on human well- being and biodiversity Q: What are the key benefits of water and wetlands? And which are easier or more difficult to demonstrate? • Despite their benefits, the loss of wetlands continues Q: What do you see as the main threats to water and wetlands (including coastal areas)? Are there particular ecosystems which are at greatest risks?
  10. 10. Evidence base - Assessing values and actionsAssessing the value of working with natural capital has helped determine whereecosystems can provide goods and services at lower cost than by man-madetechnological alternatives and where they can lead to significant savings• USA-NY: Catskills-Delaware watershed for NY: PES/working with nature saves money (~5US$bn)• New Zealand: Te Papanui Park - water supply to hydropower, Dunedin city, farmers (~$136m)• Mexico: PSAH to forest owners, aquifer recharge, water quality, deforestation, poverty (~US$303m)• France & Belgium: Priv. Sector: Vittel (Mineral water) PES & Rochefort (Beer) PES for water quality• Venezuela: PA helps avoid potential replacement costs of hydro dams (~US$90-$134m over 30yr)• Vietnam restoring/investing in Mangroves - cheaper than dyke maintenance (~US$: 1m to 7m/yr)• South Africa: WfW public PES to address IAS, avoids costs and provides jobs (~20,000; 52%♀)• Germany : peatland restoration: avoidance cost of CO2 ~ 8 to 12 €/t CO2 (0-4 alt. land use) Critical to assess where working with nature saves money for public (city, region, national), private sector, communities and citizens & who can make it happenSources: various. Mainly in TEEB for National and International Policy Makers, TEEB for local and regional policy and TEEB cases
  11. 11. TEEB For Water and Wetlands 1. TEEB & The TEEB for Water and Wetlands Project 2. Water and wetlands: what benefits do we derive and what do we risk losing? 3. Measuring to manage better 4. Integrating the values of water and wetlands into decision making 5. Working recommendations: Transforming our approach to water and wetlands 6. Next Steps & Panel questions
  12. 12. TEEB For Water and Wetlands3 Measuring to manage better • A diverse range of tools help identify, demonstrate and take account of the benefits of water and wetlands Strategic Plan 2011-2020 Aichi Target 2: By • Bio-physical assessments 2020, at the latest, biodiversity values have • Measurement and indicators been integrated into national and local • Mapping the interrelationships development and poverty reduction strategies and planning processes and are • Assessing the value of nature being incorporated into national accounting, • Plurality of tools as appropriate, and reporting systems. • Mix of economic and non economic • Natural capital and environmental-economic accounts (SEEA, WAVES et al) • Need a culture of assessment and seeing the whole picture • Useful to have mix of qualitative, quantitative and monetary insightsQ: Are you aware of any initiatives to improve the measurement of the contributions of wetland ecosystems to society and the economy ? Q: Are these initiatives being linked to NBSAP revision efforts?
  13. 13. Taking account of public goods …can change what is the “right” decision on land/resource use US$ Based only on private gain, the “trade- Shrimp Farm /ha/yr off” choice favours conversion….. Mangroves $12,392/ha 10000 $9632/ha After Adding Storm Public protection 5000 Benefits From mangroves $1220/ha Fishery $584/ha nursery $584/ha private profits private private 0 profits profits Net of public less costs of subsidies restoration needed If public wealth is included, the “trade-off” after 5 years choice changes completely…..Important that investment / permit / subsidy choices -ve $11,172/ha take into account the whole picture of the benefits Source: Barbier et al, 2007
  14. 14. TEEB For Water and WetlandsValuation of ESS from Kampala wetlands, UgandaServices provided by the Nakivubo swamp include natural water purification andtreatment & supporting small-scale income activities of poorer communitiesProblem recognition: Plans to drain the Nakivubo Swamp (>40sqkm) for agriculture→ Waste water treatment capacity of the swamp was assessed (Emerton 2004)Assessment: Maintaining the wetlands: ~235.000$ p.a.Running a sewage treatment facility of equivalent capacity: ~2Mio. US$ p.a.Policy Solution: draining plans abandoned & Nakivubo Swamps designated as PA Sources: TEEBCases for TEEB for local and regional policyRecognising and demonstrating the values again critical for decision making. Capacity support .
  15. 15. TEEB For Water and Wetlands 1. TEEB & The TEEB for Water and Wetlands Project 2. Water and wetlands: what benefits do we derive and what do we risk losing? 3. Measuring to manage better 4. Integrating the values of water and wetlands into decision making 5. Working recommendations: Transforming our approach to water and wetlands 6. Next Steps & Panel questions
  16. 16. TEEB For Water and Wetlands 4. Integrating the values of water and wetlands into decision making• Policy synergies: Working with nature can be a cost effective way of meeting a range of policy, business and private objectives. • water security (see above) and food and energy security (ensuring water security for agriculture and energy production), poverty alleviation and meeting sustainable development goals collectively.• Integrated decision making : valuable tools to respond to the value of nature • Spatial planning and regulation Target 3: By 2020, at the latest, incentives, including subsidies, harmful to biodiversity are • Investment and management eliminated, phased out or reformed in order to • Prices, subsidies and subsidy reform minimize or avoid negative impacts, and • Payment for ecosystem services (PES) sustainable use of biodiversity are developed positive incentives for the conservation and and applied, consistent and in harmony with the Convention and other relevant internationalQ: What instruments have worked, where, how obligations, taking into account national socio- economic conditions.have they been launched and made to work, andwhat benefits have they brought?
  17. 17. TEEB For Water and Wetlands ‘We never know the worth of water til the well is dry’. ‘ English proverb‘Men do not value a good deed unless it brings a reward’ Ovid, B.C. 43 – 18 A.D., Roman Poet
  18. 18. Hydrological services: Aquifer recharge; Improved surface water quality, reduceSolution: Mexico PSAH: PES to frequency & damage from flooding` forest owners to preserve forest: manage & not convert forestResultDeforestation rate fell from 1.6 % to 0.6 %.18.3 thousand hectares of avoided deforestationAvoided GHG emissions ~ 3.2 million tCO2e Reduce Deforestation Address Poverty Investment in good spatially relevant data critical to develop an2010); Muñoz-Piña et al. policy instruments 2007 Munoz evidence base for 2008; Muñoz-Piña et al.
  19. 19. Multiple Objectives : PSAH Mexico AquifersBalance of priorities varied over time A Poverty Water scarcityP WS Deforestation An instrument can evolve and respond to changing needs D Munoz 2010); Muñoz-Piña et al. 2008
  20. 20. TEEB For Water and Wetlands 1. TEEB & The TEEB for Water and Wetlands Project 2. Water and wetlands: what benefits do we derive and what do we risk losing? 3. Measuring to manage better 4. Integrating the values of water and wetlands into decision making 5. Working recommendations: Transforming our approach to water and wetlands 6. Next Steps & Panel questions
  21. 21. TEEB For Water and Wetlands5. Working recommendations: Transforming our approachto water and wetlandsThere is a need to put water at the heart of the transition to a green economy and recognisethe critical role of wetlands and water related ecosystems in the water cycle.• Appreciating and taking account of the values of nature;• Commitment to fully integrate management of wetlands and secure their wise use;• Prioritisation for avoiding loss/conversion ;• Restoration• Ensuring equitable benefit sharing and social and economic efficiency .There will be a need for action at all levels and across stakeholders if the opportunities ofworking with nature are to be realised and the risks of losses appreciated and acted upon. Q: What can different stakeholders do to work with nature and people to realise the benefits of water and wetlands?
  22. 22. TEEB For Water and Wetlands The water-related investment challenge• Total costs of replacing aging water supply and sanitation infrastructure in industrial countries alone: ~US$ 200 billion a year (WBCSD)• Meeting the MDGs: Estimated investment requirements for water infrastructure to meet drinking water and sanitation objectives alone = up to US$ 22 trillion by 2030 (Davidson, 2010)• “Natural infrastructure” maintenance and restoration can contribute to this - though where and to what extent depends on local circumstances. What examples do you have of where working with nature offers cost-effective solution and/or wider benefits to communities, society and the economy ?
  23. 23. Working for Water (WfW): SAThe Manalana wetland (near Bushbuckridge, Mpumalanga)Restoration within wider PES scheme Sources: TEEBCases for TEEB for local and regional policy• Severely degraded by erosion that threatened to consume the entire system• WfW public works programme intervened in 2006 to reduce the erosion and improve the wetland’s ability to continue providing its beneficial servicesResults• The value of livelihood benefits from degraded wetland was just 34 % of what could beachieved after investment in ecosystem rehabilitation;• Rehabilitated wetland now contributes provisioning services at a net return of 297EUR/household/year;• Livelihood benefits ~ 182,000 EUR by the rehabilitated wetland; x2 costs• The Manalana wetland acts as a safety net for households. Sources: Pollard et al. 2008; Wunder et al 2008a; http://www.dwaf.gov.za/wfw/ Recognising and demonstrating the values and potential for increased value critically important.
  24. 24. TEEB For Water and Wetlands 1. TEEB & The TEEB for Water and Wetlands Project 2. Water and wetlands: what benefits do we derive and what do we risk losing? 3. Measuring to manage better 4. Integrating the values of water and wetlands into decision making 5. Working recommendations: Transforming our approach to water and wetlands 6. Next Steps & Panel questions
  25. 25. TEEB For Water and WetlandsNext Steps …is this enough to work ou what to do?The TEEB for W&W: from Rio, to Ramsar COP11 in Bucharest, andCBD COP11 in Hyderabad in October 2012.TEEB for Water and Wetlands initiative aims to reflect the differentperspectives, practice and experiences from across countries andstakeholders on water and wetlands from around the world. …always better to look at the whole board And engage the full set of playersCall for Case Studies!Please do communicate case practices and insights as this will help reflect interesting practicesfrom around the globe in this work.Comments on this briefing, answers to the questions and cases examples please send to Patrickten Brink (Ptenbrink@ieep.eu) or Dr Daniela Russi (DRussi@ieep.eu)For further information on the initiative write to Dr Andrew Farmer (AFarmer@ieep.eu).Please add “Water and Wetlands” in the subject line in any communications
  26. 26. TEEB For Water and WetlandsPanel questions & discussionQ1: What are the key benefits of water and wetlands? And whichare easier/more difficult to demonstrate?Q2: What do you see as the main challenges for water and wetlandsin the transition to the green economy? Barriers, gaps, opportunitiesand drivers.Q3: Who can do what to work with nature and people to realise thebenefits of water and wetlands? And what is the one thing youwould do?
  27. 27. Thank you TEEB Reports available on http://www.teebweb.org/ See also www.teeb4me.com Patrick ten Brink ptenbrink@ieep.euIEEP is an independent, not-for-profit institute dedicated to the analysis, understanding and promotion of policies for a sustainable environment. www.ieep.eu See also IEEP’s award winning Manual of European Environmental Policy http://www.ieep.eu/the-manual/introduction/ http://www.europeanenvironmentalpolicy.eu/
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×