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Collaborative Systems
 

Collaborative Systems

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I discuss theory of collaboration support tools, and look at a selection of web2.0 services in the context of supporting teaching and learning in an HE institution.

I discuss theory of collaboration support tools, and look at a selection of web2.0 services in the context of supporting teaching and learning in an HE institution.

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    Collaborative Systems Collaborative Systems Presentation Transcript

    • Collaboration and co-learning Pat Parslow (p.parslow@reading.ac.uk) OdinLab (odinlab@reading.ac.uk) – Shirley Williams, Karsten Lundqvist, Richard Hussey, Patrick Hathway, Sarah Fleming 24 March 2009
    •  S. Kleanthous and V. Dimitrova 2006  Towards a Holistic Personalised Support for Knowledge Sharing in Virtual Learning Communities E. Tomadaki and P. Scott (Eds.): Innovative Approaches for Learning and Knowledge  Sharing, EC-TEL 2006 Workshops Proceedings, ISSN 1613-0073, p. 333-344, 2006. Community/Enterprise 24 March 2009
    •  quot;The key for a transactive memory system to function is that the divergence of information held in members’ heads must be known to the others.quot; Community/Enterprise 24 March 2009
    •  Consensual reality - the agreed representation of the environment, despite differing subjective filters  Agreement on concepts (and the processes used to gain agreement) 24 March 2009
    •  Members' positions within the community and the roles they play Community/Enterprise 24 March 2009
    •  TM: Search, feeds, quot;missingquot; ontology (relationships between knowledge) but hyperlinks and crediting fill gap to some degree (and build trust)  SMM: Visualisations help build common understanding. Missing from most SNS, but tag clouds a primitive form. Topic maps etc. can be used. Also communal bookmarking helps + Cohere (cohere.open.ac.uk and MeAggregator)  CCon: Categories and tagging, ontologies and folksonomies  CCen: Doing some work on tool to help people recognise their position in a community, based on feeds. Early days. Also an aspect of DI work 24 March 2009
    •  Connectivism tenet - knowledge has short half-life; not what you know but how quickly you can assimilate and use knowledge  perhaps the “Social Network” *is* the learning from this viewpoint... 24 March 2009
    •  50% of our students report learning through using Facebook  It has no learning materials in it! (Facebook v Blackboard study, 2007)  Students appear to value a ‘safe environment’  But for them this means not having oversight by staff  Control of who sees what  Open discussion in self-defined peer groups 24 March 2009
    •  Collaborative tools to capture the knowledge for later use - wiki, ontology, folksonomy  Cost effectiveness, speed of deployment, mentoring, local experts  These tools support learning, but also straight forward collaboration – they enable a more distributed virtual office than traditional means of communication and group work permit 24 March 2009
    •  Static web content  Supports Transactive memory  Slight support for Shared mental models  No real support for cognitive consensus  No support for cognitive centrality  Also true of content management systems (generally) 24 March 2009
    •  Forums  Slight support for Transactive memory  Support for Shared mental models  Slight support for cognitive consensus  Slight support for cognitive centrality  Also true, to a degree, for email lists 24 March 2009
    •  Wikis  Support for Transactive memory  Support for Shared mental models  Support for cognitive consensus  No real support for cognitive centrality  Mode of use tends to imply a ‘correct’ view decided by consensus, with majority drowning out ‘fringe’ views 24 March 2009
    •  Blogs  Slight support for Transactive memory  If you have an aggregated view  Slight support for Shared mental models  No real support for cognitive consensus  Some support for cognitive centrality  With aggregation – blogs emphasise the individual view over the consensual view 24 March 2009
    •  Social Bookmarking  E.g. Delicious, clipmarks, amplify, citeulike  Slight support for Transactive memory  More of an index into TM than a form of TM itself  Slight support for Shared mental models  Tagging provides a slight insight into others mental models  No support for cognitive consensus  Some support for cognitive centrality  You can build a view of where you ‘sit’ within the bookmarking community 24 March 2009
    •  Online office tools  Such as Google Docs, Office Online, Zoho et al  Supports Transactive Memory  Though in a fragmented way  No real support for Shared mental models  Without ‘meta’ level documents being generated  Support for cognitive consensus  No real support for cognitive centrality  Most documents are private to small groups (though, see scribd) 24 March 2009
    •  Concept mapping tools  Such as Mindmeister, Cmaptools, Cohere  Supports Transactive Memory  Though as a ‘high level view’  Support for Shared mental models  Almost by definition!  Support for cognitive consensus  Though generally not for the processes involved in achieving it  No real support for cognitive centrality  Individual maps possible + community maps, but seeing a view of how yours fits into the whole is ‘missing’ 24 March 2009
    •  SNS  Some support for Transactive memory  Depending on use, but shared files for groups etc.  Some support for Shared mental models  But would be improved by having mind mapping/concept/topic/ontology tools built in  Some support for cognitive consensus  Embedded forums (including ‘wall’ and comments)  Groups which can have ‘rules’ defining behavioural norms  Some support for cognitive centrality  View of group memberships  Lists of interests 24 March 2009
    •  Corporate culture - does it clash?  If “yes” then  Change_culture! || do_things_your_own_way  End if  Accreditation - how do you prove soft-knowledge gained through SNS use? (trust networks, ePortfolios)  Open - can staff/students take their ePortfolio with them?  One size fits all?  ‘wiki-wars’ etc  People prefer different systems for valid reasons 24 March 2009
    •  When using any collaborative system  Your use says something about you  Most require an ‘account’  To benefit from ‘network effect’ you need to be findable  Profiles convey information about you  What do you want to portray?  How persistent is information about you?  Can you create a good impression without a DI?  This Is Me – http://thisisme.reading.ac.uk  Funded by Eduserv 24 March 2009
    •  Diversity is not a bad thing  But keeping track of materials used in different systems is hard work  Re-using content is not as easy as it should be  MeAggregator is a service oriented, agent based system based on a folksonomical file system  Tag your resources  Tag your friends/colleagues  Apply permissions to resources  Aggregate and re-publish content  Funded by JISC 24 March 2009
    •  open-learner models (OLM) + domain ontologies -> difference engines -> individual learning plans  Topic/concept maps + domain ontologies -> differece engines -> work-flow, research plans etc.  OLM aggregation + behaviour logs -> recommender systems  Recommend learning styles  Recommend learning resources  Recommend mentors 24 March 2009
    • 24 March 2009