La “traduzione” giornalistica della ricerca medico-scientifica

1,900 views
1,811 views

Published on

Luca Carra, Corso PS 2008 modulo c

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,900
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
506
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

La “traduzione” giornalistica della ricerca medico-scientifica

  1. 1. La “traduzione” giornalistica della ricerca medico-scientifica Luca Carra, Zadig, Milano
  2. 2. LA SEMANTICA
  3. 3. Journalists vs. medical scientists ? <ul><li>Shared interests Journalists Medical scientists news innovative ideas surprise unexpected results drama promising/disappointing results impact clinical relevant results celebrity excellence personification self promotion </li></ul><ul><li>Conflicting focuses of interest Journalists Medical scientists events processes individual (anecdotes) group (aggregated data) speculation verification/falsification clarity uncertainty simplicity qualification conflict consensus </li></ul>
  4. 4. Science reporting between entertainment and promotion <ul><li>“ Too often science in the press is more a subject for consumption than for public scrutiny, more a source of entertainment than of information. Too often science is presented as an arcane activity outside and above the sphere od normal human understanding, and therefore beyond our control. Too often the coverage is promotional and uncritical , encouraging apathy, a sense of impotence, and the ubiquitous tendency to defer the expertise” </li></ul><ul><li>Dorothy Nelkin </li></ul>
  5. 5. Mechanism of Media coverage in health topics <ul><li>Hyping the problem </li></ul><ul><li>(exaggerated data) </li></ul><ul><li>Stiring up fears </li></ul><ul><li>(risk over-evaluation) </li></ul><ul><li>Inducing to exams </li></ul><ul><li>(medicalisation) </li></ul><ul><li>Banalizing solutions </li></ul><ul><li>(drugs ecc.) </li></ul>
  6. 6. Non journalistic sources of up-to-date information <ul><li>TV: “In a random sample survey of about 1.000 regular ER viewers, over half said that they learn about important health care issues from ER , and one-third indicated that information they received from the show helped them make choices about their family’s health care. As many as 12 percent of viewers reported that they had contacted a physician because of something they had seen on the show”. Associates Princeton Survey Research, 1997 </li></ul><ul><li>Internet: “ Nearly half of adult Internet users had recently visited health and medical websites”. Eysenbach, The impact of the Internet on Cancer Outcomes , Cancer Journal for Clinicians, Vol 53, N. 6, December 2003 </li></ul>
  7. 7. Obiettivi dell’articolo <ul><li>Per il giornalista: scegliere una notizia e trattarla in base a quello che pensa possa interessare il suo pubblico (un incrocio fra la portinaia e i suoi genitori), e perché vuol farsi conoscere. </li></ul><ul><li>Per lo scienziato: proporre un proprio studio perché lo ritiene - fine nei minimi particolari - di fondamentale interesse per l’umanità, e perché vuol farsi conoscere. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Ciò che rende preziosa la merce “salute” <ul><li>Una storia da raccontare </li></ul><ul><li>Delle vittime da compatire (meglio se bambini) </li></ul><ul><li>Qualcuno con cui prendersela (meglio se le autorità) </li></ul><ul><li>Avere cifre da cui ricavare classifiche (possibilmente per dimostrare che ci sono dei buoni e dei cattivi) </li></ul><ul><li>Riferire qualcosa di controintuitivo (“le vitamine fanno male”) </li></ul><ul><li>Far dire a un personaggio pubblico qualcosa che non aveva mai detto prima e che scatenerà una sequela di reazioni, rettifiche ecc. </li></ul><ul><li>Una speranza da dare </li></ul>
  9. 9. LA GRAMMATICA
  10. 10. Struttura articolo standard <ul><li>One shot/ scaletta logica </li></ul><ul><li>Attacco (what, who, where, when, why) </li></ul><ul><li>Svolgimento (how): carattere ricorsivo </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusione La differenza più rilevante, quanto a struttura di esposizione, fra una ricerca scientifica e un articolo giornalistico o un comunicato stampa, è che l’articolo salta i metodi e l’introduzione a va subito al contenuto primario (conclusioni). Se c’è spazio, accennerà a metodi, campione statistico, contesto, ecc. nello svolgimento. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Lingua dell’articolo <ul><li>No gergo! (non “ammalare”, ma “ammalarsi”) </li></ul><ul><li>Ragionamento senza salti (no scatola nera) </li></ul><ul><li>Precisione, leggerezza, essenzialità (lunghezza frasi, uso avverbi, giuste attribuzioni agli autori e alla fonte, particolari “minori” dello studio ecc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Citazioni (virgolettati) che commentino i dati </li></ul><ul><li>Numeri con parsimonia </li></ul>
  12. 12. That’s journalism, baby! <ul><li>Limitarsi ai pareri di esperti </li></ul><ul><li>Trattare gli specialisti come tuttologi </li></ul><ul><li>Confondere la fantasia con i fatti </li></ul><ul><li>Farsi ingannare dai numeri </li></ul><ul><li>Prendere gli aneddoti come prove </li></ul><ul><li>Leggere acriticamente i risultati di studi </li></ul><ul><li>Estrapolare dalla ricerca alla pratica </li></ul><ul><li>Enfatizzare la rilevanza clinica </li></ul><ul><li>Confondere i fattori di rischio per malattie </li></ul><ul><li>Presentare i rischi in modo ingannevole </li></ul><ul><li>Da Ragnar Levi: Medical journalism, 2001 </li></ul>
  13. 13. Pitfalls in medical reporting From Ragnar Levi: Medical journalism, 2001 <ul><li>1. Reducing reporting to quoting “If reporters do not ask experts for evidence supporting their claims or check the claims’ veracity in other ways, the message conveyed to the audience may be untrue even though the experts’ quotes are technically accurate. Truthfully reporting is thereby reduced to quoting accurately something that has been said, without checking wether has been true. Reporters should always remain skeptical of authoritative statements. One important reason is that expert’s recommendations have been shown to lag behind empirical evidence”. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sources: - Clinical Evidence - Cochrane Reviews </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Pitfalls in medical reporting From Ragnar Levi: Medical journalism, 2001 <ul><li>2. Treating specialists as generalists “For example, the inexperienced reporter may assume that an expert on cell proliferation also know about cancer treatment, when in fact he or she may be completely ignorant in this related field”. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: Italian Nobel Laureates </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Pitfalls in medical reporting From Ragnar Levi: Medical journalism, 2001 <ul><li>3. Confusing science fiction with scientific facts “Public expectations about what health care and medical technology can achieve in curing disease and relieving symptoms are sometimes unrealistically high. The clinical application of gene therapies has been heavily promoted in the media, although important technical problems remain”. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Other exemples: Stem cells Genome Project </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Pitfalls in medical reporting From Ragnar Levi: Medical journalism, 2001 <ul><li>4. Being misled by number games “One of the rethorical devices that sources occasionally employ is emphasizing a statement’s objecivity and accuracy by using excessive precision in numbers”. “Another number game sources often play is the relative risk reduction , inted of absolute risk reduction or number needed to treat , which give a more realistica picture of the clinical trade-off involved”. </li></ul>Sample of 207 TV and newspaper stories (1994-1998) 124 quantified benefits 83% use relative figures 3% use absolute figures 14% use both
  17. 17. Pitfalls in medical reporting From Ragnar Levi: Medical journalism, 2001 <ul><li>5. Depending on anecdotes for evidence We are overly susceptible to anedoctal evidence. Anectotes make good reading and we are right to use them.. Ut we often forget to remind our readers - and ourseleves - of the folly of generalizing from a new a few interesting cases… The statistic is hard to remember. The stories are not”. Philip Meyer, reporter </li></ul><ul><li>“ I quickly learnt to drop the classic who, what, when, where and why. That’s not what reporters want. They want to tell good stories. So they need human faces, people, the picture, family portrait.” Mark Stuart, PR director, Hill and Knowlton </li></ul>
  18. 18. Pitfalls in medical reporting From Ragnar Levi: Medical journalism, 2001 <ul><li>6. Failing to question findings about a treatment’s effect “Results from a single clinical trial rarely prove anything. Findings shoud be replicated ”. “In a randomized controlled trial looking at peer review , a paper with eight significant errors was sent to 420 reviewers in JAMA’s database. None spotted more than five errors, and most not more than two”,. JAMA, 1998; 280:237-40 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Source: Recent Cochrane Review on peer review. </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. Pitfalls in medical reporting From Ragnar Levi: Medical journalism, 2001 <ul><li>7. Extrapolating from research to clinical practice “ Patient selection and protocol may be so narrow that they correspond only to exceptional situations and not to clinical reality” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Other points: - Difference between efficacy and effectivness (i.e. Flu vaccine) </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Pitfalls in medical reporting From Ragnar Levi: Medical journalism, 2001 <ul><li>8. Hyping a study’s clinical implications “Many results that are statistically significant are completely irrelevant and useless in real-life clinical practice”. “Researchers can limit their studies to certain aspects of treatment outcome, to surrogate measures like tumor volume, blood tests, etc. The patient is probably more concerned with how the disease will affect his or her daily life. For example, many patients want to know more about long term affects of treatments, including quality of life”. Hilda Bastian, Cochrane </li></ul>
  21. 21. Pitfalls in medical reporting From Ragnar Levi: Medical journalism, 2001 <ul><li>9. Mistaking risk factors for diseases “A risk factor is not an illness in itself but a signal. Many people who belong to an at-risk population will never develop the disease that they are at risk for”. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: high blood pressure treatment of people 35-54 age old with only mild hypertension > chances of avoiding stroke from 99,3% to 99,6% </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Pitfalls in medical reporting From Ragnar Levi: Medical journalism, 2001 <ul><li>10. Misjudging risks “We tend to consider rare but dramatic events to be grater hazards than the familiar risks that we face every day. Furthermore, our tolerance is greater for risks that we ourseleves have decided to take than for those that are imposed on us by others”. </li></ul>Media triggers A possible risk to public is more likely to become a major story if the following are prominent or can readily be made to become so: 1. Questions of blame 2. Alleged secrets and attempted cover-ups 3. Human interest through identifiable heroes, villains, dupes, etc. 4. Links with existing high-profile issues or personalities 5. Conflict 6. Signal value : the story as a portent of further ills (“What next?”) 7. Many people exposed (“It could be you!”) 8. Strong visual impact 9. Links to sex and/or crime P. Bennet, K. Calman, Risk Communication and public health, Oxford University press
  23. 23. QUALCHE ESEMPIO
  24. 24. Coxib, anno zero La sentenza dei giudici texani che ha attribuito all’antidolorifico Vioxx la morte di un uomo per disturbi al cuore e obbligato la ditta produttrice a un risarcimento di più di 200 milioni di dollari, è un precedente che allunga ombre inquietanti sul futuro della Merck. Le circa 4.200 cause che l’azienda potrebbe dover affrontare nei prossimi anni contro chi ritiene di aver subito un danno dall’uso del suo farmaco e dalla mancata informazione sui rischi cardiaci rischia, secondo gli analisti finanziari, di tradursi in un danno dai 3 ai 10 miliardi di dollari. Contestato dalla Merck e considerato discutibile anche da alcuni ricercatori quanto a “scientificità”, questo primo processo apre comunque un grande punto di domanda sul futuro di tutta la categoria degli antidolorifici COX-2, di cui fa parte il Vioxx. Anche se non è detto che gli altri farmaci di questa classe debbano seguire la stessa sventurata china, anzi, per ora sembrano avvantaggiarsi del ritiro del rofecoxib. Celecoxib (Celebrex), della Pfizer, dopo aver subito una flessione nelle vendite, ha recuperato nel corso dell’anno. Etoricoxib (Arcoxia), della Merck, e lumiracoxib (Prexige), Novartis, hanno ottenuto ottimi risultati anche se l’FDA, ora più vigile che in passato, li tiene per ora fuori dal mercato USA. Le aziende farmaceutiche devono comunque recuperare parte del terreno perso. Molte hanno deciso di riproporre sostanze meno redditizie ma più collaudate e contemporaneamente percorrere nuove strade. La Glaxo Smith Kline ha raggiunto la fase 3 nella sperimentazione del cox-2 “406381”, Shering Plough e Astazeneca hanno investito in un programma comune per produrre un nuovo antidolorifico. Queste ditte beneficiano del deragliamento del treno che stavano per perdere: in ritardo rispetto ai concorrenti ora possono proporre farmaci “senza macchia”, pronti a conquistare parte dei 10 miliardi di dollari all’anno che, secondo gli analisti, dovrebbe produrre il settore antidolorifici. La lezione del Vioxx ha forse insegnato alle aziende del farmaco a non nascondere i dati critici in loro possesso, come sembra essere avvenuto nel caso della Merck. E’ stata infatti resa nota una lettera interna del 2001 che invitava 3.000 informatori scientifici dell’azienda a tagliare corto sulla dannosità del farmaco per il cuore. NOSTRA PROPOSTA
  25. 25. Farmaci & scandali Chi curerà il dolore? Il fatto è noto: la multinazionale americana Merck & Co è stata condannata da una corte del Texas a pagare 253 milioni di dollari di risarcimento alla vedova di Robert Evans, morto per un attacco cardiaco, attribuito dai giudici all’antidolorifico Vioxx. Ora, c’è il domani: fatto, per la Merck, delle circa 4.200 cause che l’azienda potrebbe trovarsi ad affrontare nei prossimi anni e in un danno, stimano gli analisti, che oscilla tra i 3 e i 10 miliardi di dollari. Ma non è tutto. Contestato dalla Merck e considerato discutibile anche da alcuni ricercatori quanto a “scientificità”, questo primo processo lascia orfani molti pazienti che usavano con soddisfazione Vioxx e getta un interrogativo  sul futuro di tutta la categoria degli antidolorifici anti-Cox-2. Perché, per quanto discutibile possano essere le strategie di marketing che ne hanno accompagnato l’introduzione, la maggior parte dei reumatologi annota che gli anti-Cox2 sono stati una benedizione per i malati di dolore cronico.Va detto, senz’altro, che soltanto il Vioxx è stato ritenuto pericoloso e, per ora gli altri membri della famiglia restano nelle farmacie: Celecoxib (Celebrex), della Pfizer, dopo aver subito una flessione nelle vendite, ha recuperato nel corso dell’anno. Etoricoxib (Arcoxia), della stessa Merck, e lumiracoxib (Prexige), di Novartis, hanno ottenuto ottimi risultati anche se l’Fda non ha ancora consentito la loro introduzione nel mercato Usa. L’ombra gettata dal caso Vioxx su questi antidolorifici, tuttavia, ha messo il sale sulla coda alle aziende che hanno farmaci contro il dolore in arrivo: Glaxo Smith Kline è in dirittura di arrivo con un altro anti-Cox2, e Shering Plough e Astrazeneca hanno investito in un programma comune per produrre un nuovo antidolorifico. A tutti, comunque, la lezione del Vioxx dovrebbe aver insegnato a non nascondere i dati critici, come sembra essere avvenuto nel caso della Merck. E’ stata infatti resa nota una lettera interna del 2001 che invitava 3.000 informatori scientifici dell’azienda a tagliare corto sulla dannosità del farmaco per il cuore. RIFACIMENTO ESPRESSO

×