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Paramore University: Content Strategy with Karen McGrane
 

Paramore University: Content Strategy with Karen McGrane

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Web content: it's the meat in the sandwich, not the icing on the cake. Too often, organizations fail to deliver content that meets user needs and serves their business goals. Even during website ...

Web content: it's the meat in the sandwich, not the icing on the cake. Too often, organizations fail to deliver content that meets user needs and serves their business goals. Even during website redesigns, the editorial process gets short shrift in favor of building new features and creating new designs. Thinking about the content is always left until the last minute, always thought to be "somebody else's problem."

These are session keynote Karen McGrane's slides from her portion of the presentation. Thanks for coming!

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    Paramore University: Content Strategy with Karen McGrane Paramore University: Content Strategy with Karen McGrane Presentation Transcript

    • Hi! I’m Karen McGranefrom Bond Art + Science @karenmcgrane 1
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    • what aboutthe art? 7
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    • when dowe seethe art? 10
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    • WHERE ISTHE ART? 13
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    • DISASTERSTRIKES! 16
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    • YOU WOULDN’T BUILDA GALLERY THIS WAY. 21
    • WHY WOULD YOU BUILDA WEBSITE THIS WAY? 22
    • TWO BIG PROBLEMS 23
    • “Organizations invest tremendous resources ondeveloping the framework for a great userexperience — fabulous design, robust contentmanagement infrastructure.Yet when it comes to the content itself, theresoften a gap.The end result is that the value proposition forcustomers cant be delivered because thecontent is insufficient, inadequate, andinappropriate. — Rahel Bailie 24
    • We already have most of the content. Copywriting just isn’t that big of a deal. We can figure the content out later. We pretty much know what we want to say.Our marketing team ishandling the content. Kristina Halvorson, Brain Traffic 25
    • WHY CONTENT STRATEGY?WHY NOW? 26
    • FROM TOStatic DynamicCentralized DecentralizedWalled SocialCostly CheapGeeky Mainstream 27
    • USER EXPERIENCE Information Architecture CONTENT STRATEGY Social Media Content Marketing ManagementMARKETING TECHNOLOGY 28
    • • What are my business objectives? • What do my users want to do? • What does my brand stand for? De te gy sig tra nS S tra teg te nt y C on Product Strategy• How will users interact with it? • What do we want to say?• How will it be structured? • Where will we get the content?• What will it look like? • Who will maintain it? Technology Strategy • How will we build it? • Who will maintain it? 29
    • NAMING A PAIN POINT. 31
    • DEFINING A PROCESS. 32
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    • Current Site AuditStakeholder & Competitive &User Interviews Market Research Vision Insight Design Development QA Requirements IA Design Creative Design Usability Testing Post Launch Paper Prototype & Creative Comps Analytics Report Test, Measure, and Optimize
    • User Experience Design Process: Critical Path Kickoff Project Initiation Initial Design Cyc l e Design Iteration / Testing / Itera Meeting Project is Product Marketing Prod. Marketing does P&L, content evaluation, Product Team meets - inititated by Product creates materials that describe needs, goals, Marketing with Prod. Mktg. feeds team Design presents functional objectives, dependencies, partnerships, user flow, potential user Program business issues and any other relev a n t any results from Marke t Management scenarios and high level content or functionality issues, pulls together Resear c h screens need e d cross-functional tea m Approval cycle h e r e Feasability Studies / Field Resear c h Expert advice on Usability What do Users w a n t previous research a n d feedback cyc l e How do they want to do it Meeting new research need e d (Usability Conceptual Phase) (Usability 2nd Phase) coordinated by Program feedback cy Management UE Team member Create D e s i g n assigned to Spec/Creative Rapid prototype forExperience Design project Brie f proof of concept attends meeting UE Team Material is from and early testing w / brainstorm with Initial concept MRP/PRD and Early functionality usability brainstorms wit h Takes input from Usability - led by brainstorming notes designs and all members as project team Product Marketing to and other definitions of Could be paper UE Team member assigned related to UI member collect and gather requirements, distills pages needed for prototype, functional to project design requirements and info, looks at developed static HTML, Flash whats the best understand competitive functionality interaction, Receives Requirements scenario fo r competitive landscape landscape, rev i e w s Mockups/ Document use r s scope in context of Wireframes as Needs: network and sit e image maps List of team precedenc e members, contact info, initial schedule, approval process Initial exposure to (people) scope of design and functionality HTML Assess techn i c a l limitations and alternatives Engineering Engineering might begin coding work from initial functionality spe c sCredits: Erin Malone: Designed for AltaVista November 10, 2000 36
    • An Example LEGEND MILESTONE DELIVERABLE IDEA REVIEW CHECKPOINT Product / Software / Web Design Process Guide KEY MEETING INFORM PHASES concept discover definition refinement developmen conceptual MILESTONES start concept approval proposal approval and scheduling design review PRD approval UI design approval committed schedule Communicate business needs Communicate business needs Brand Positioning Review Promotional & Marketing Needs Business developm & brand identity & brand identity { Mockups to markeNote: In some companies these roles are business ownersencompassed by one person Collect team input Product Roadmap Promotion plan Describe problem or needs, Develop strategic rationale, business case, proposed solution, and benefits. financial analysis, policy considerations, implementation plans. Research: Solicit input from Business owners/ Point release plan product Gather information for and brands - contact other associated stakeholders (legal, customer support, international) manager create the Concept Document Gather supporting market research, etc. Write Draft PRD and Review Gather information for and create the Deliverables: ROLES Proposal Document Project kickoff Product Requirements Document Review user feedback on previous product Refine design concepts (PRD) Wireframes and navigation maps UIs and analyze competitive products. (authored by a { ui/id/ia Develop navigation model and Product Manager) Product prototype, e.g. paper, HTML, director, or flash refine scenarios design Provide input for level of effort UI Design Approvalor two people. i.e. ui may do user research or visual designers may do ia, etc. and Idea Deliverable: Deliverable: Deliverable: Define personas, usage scenarios, user Proposal Templates Concept goals, and perform task analysis I T E R AT I O N S I T E R AT I O Document Document Concept Design Review & Develop usage scenarios this step Navigation and/or design concepts Concept and / or may be (authored byNote: In some companies these roles are blended into one optional Design UI / ID / IA Design) Provide input for level of effort Visual design explorations Refined Visual design explorations Art direction Materials Leads brainstorming Concept (authored by visual Prototype blended design design team) Provide input for level of effort UCD research contd. (i.e. paper prototyping, Competitive usability testing Prototype usability test Prototype testing participatory design, field studies, surveys, etc. Define personas, usage scenarios, user user goals, and perform task analysis. research production Provide input for level of effort credits Design based on earlier maps created by various UI design teams at America Online Incorporated. Revised and edited by Erin Malone, September 2003 for the AIfIA. 37
    • PHASE 1 PHASE 2Design Analysis Design Solutions TSDesign User Experience Audit SM Product Strategy and Product Design Strategy Blueprint* Technology Audit description: • an expert design analysis from the user’s perspective description: • define ‘what the product should be’ and ‘how it 1 understand 2 investigate 3 define users 4 qualify features should work’ benefits: corporate mission persona user profiles user, feature, objective matrix • benchmarks the effectiveness of your site based upon stated benefits: core competencies • the achievement of clearly articulated, agreed- user profiles business objectives for the site and your users corporate goals • analyzes the design of the site to find out if the benefits of use upon and aligned mission, core competencies, culture and values User Personae & corporate goals, and objectives for the site are actually being delivered Profiling Module speculate & + interviews SM skills and methodologies • the articulation and understanding of your users, • recommends methods for substantially improving your users experiences and meeting future business objectives their needs and and your business objectives for knowledge capital and experience (UP&P) innovate people, processes & technology establishing and extending relationships with each one stakeholders and initiatives Intentional User Experience table • TSDesign Analysis FrameworkSM • the definition of the organizational resources enterprise-wide challenges competitive and comparative analysis experience brief: 1 Delivery of User Benefits The intended value the organization required to build and maintain the site Internet objectives strategy story and positioning delivers to users and customers through its site. • the creation of a detailed blueprint for design or customers and users redesign: The sequence of questions, prompts, and results - site organization (footprint) competitive landscape 2 Transaction Flow that make up a task. - useful and usable features and functions for the users * workbooks not shown The degree to which a site affords the user to easily - descriptions of intended functionality scope or 3 Navigation & Hierarchy navigate the environment and efficiently locate rele- - messaging strategy rescope relationship 5 7 vant content. The representation and support of the identity, • the receipt of a phased implementation plan with associated costs innovate 6 refine describe 4 Visual Language brand and information architecture through visual elements and overall style. new ideas new footprint and reclustered content Product Strategy Blueprint/Functional Description existing Audit comments: and new • Users arriving at the front page of the site may not understand what information is there for them. technology • The names of the sections do not give users a path to follow to find the informa- tion they need. • No specific path has been established for each user type. Users must use their best judgement to find the information they’re looking for and often may not be successful. Identity and Visual Language Audit Visual Identity Systems visual language research description: description: • By collecting and reviewing print, other tangible artifacts and • establish, with the client, a shared Web sites your company creates and disseminates, and understanding and common language for corporate standards (if they exist) we can then distill the basis visual design and how it effectively for the visual language to be developed that is consistent with communicates the brand the companys identity and product brands. This work is • define a visual language for the site continued in the Visual Systems Design phase. - logo, logotype systems - typography - grid system - color palette - imagery style and usage benefits: • provides the visual language components with which to build the interface 38
    • THE CONTENT STRATEGY PROCESS 39
    • 1. THINK BEYOND THE TEMPLATE. 40
    • Ron represents a flavorings manufacturer. One of his big customers is in Burlington, VT, and he visits their plant at least once every month or two. Being a clever sort, Ron has emailed to himself the hotel detail page for each of the hotels he regularly visits. Prior to his trip, he opens the email with “Burlington – Colchester” as the subject, and clicks on the link to take him immediately to the hotel detail page. He then selects a non-smoking room with a king bedName: Ron Buckley from the list of room types, and is prompted toAge: 47 enter his stay dates, which he does. From theFamily: Married, 2 children room detail page, he clicks “Reserve” to book aJob:   ManufacturingHome: Port Washington, NY room, enters his guest information and rewardsIncome: $55,000/year number. When he prints out his confirmation toTravel: 2-3 times per month conclude his transaction, he notes it took him less than five minutes to complete. 41
    • Travel booking Boutique sitesengines deliver on styleaggressively preferences forpromote travelers in-the-air + hotel deals knowWell-knownchains inspire Next-generationloyalty through sites innovate tobrand experience provide an easier-and rewards to-use interface 42
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    • We opted to go livewith the existing content. 46
    • Buy-in for that decision stretchedto the highest levels of the organization. 47
    • We knew the content sucked. We just believed there wasnothing we could do about it. 48
    • Within an hour, the angry calls started. Client receivedhundreds of angry calls from franchisees the first day.Complaint call volume held steady over the next weekas people called back to check on status.The client team was unprepared to make quickchanges to the content, and their slow response justadded fuel to the fire.Site had to be rolled back to the previous version whilethey came up with a plan to update the content.http://www.flickr.com/photos/schoppa/3148751414 49
    • 7000 pages. The upside is that the second45 people. launch was very successful.Six weeks. Still, I cant say that Id choose to5400+ hours. do it that way again.  50
    • HOW TO THINK PAST TEMPLATES_Talk about why it’s important to provide great content. Even when people don’t want to listen._Get content in the project plan, even if you’re not responsible for it._Scare people with the “giant spreadsheet of terror.”_Prototype and test wireframes and designs with best and worst case example content._Start content migration early: first step, not the last. 51
    • 1. THINK BEYOND THE TEMPLATE.2. EVALUATE CONTENT QUALITY. 52
    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/carlaarena/3188139819/ 53
    • DON’T LET THIS BE THE FATEOF YOUR WEB CONTENT http://www.getittogetherinc.net/images/storage%20before.JPG 54
    • From Flickr User 2493™ 55
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    • I’m better at thinking about abstract relationships between content types,classification frameworks, metadata elements, than I am at looking at the specifics of content. Dan Brown, Letter to a Content Strategist 57
    • Mythbusters, Polishing a Turd 60
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    • From Flickr User 2493™ 62
    • HOW TO EVALUATE QUALITY_Don’t just inventory: analyze your content. Don’t just look at what you have, assess whether it’s any good._Have a strategy for how to persuade stakeholders that your approach is valid._Conduct a gap analysis to compare what you have to what you need._You can usability test content too. 63
    • 1. THINK BEYOND THE TEMPLATE.2. EVALUATE CONTENT QUALITY.3. MAKE IT FUTURE FRIENDLY. Learn more at http://FutureFriend.ly 64
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    • content content contentcontent content content content 70
    • http://www.flickr.com/photos/filamentgroup/5149016958/
    • FRAGMENTED CMS TOOLSFRAGMENTED INTERNAL PROCESSESFRAGMENTED DEVICES + PLATFORMS 72
    • STRUCTURED CONTENT 73
    • MOBILE WEB MOBILE WEBSITE APPS SOCIAL TABLET MEDIA APPS CONTENTMICROSITES PRINT BLOGS EMAIL INTRANET 74
    • “Traditional publishing and content managementsystems bind content to display and deliverymechanisms, which forces a recycling approach formulti-platform publishing.A semantic content publishing system, on theother hand, creates well-defined chunks of contentthat can be combined in whatever way is mostappropriate for a particular platform. All displayissues are addressed by delivery applications,rather than by a content management systemearlier in the process. —Dan Willis http://dswillis.com/uxcrank/?p=378 75
    • MOBILE WEB MOBILE WEBSITE APPS SOCIAL TABLET MEDIA APPS PRINTMICROSITES PRINT BLOGS EMAIL INTRANET 76
    • MOBILE WEB MOBILE WEBSITE APPS SOCIAL TABLET MEDIA APPS WEBMICROSITES PRINT BLOGS EMAIL INTRANET 77
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    • TRUNCATION IS NOT ACONTENT STRATEGY 81
    • NPR’SCMS 83
    • Content admins hate all the fields.But the reason they hate all the fields is the workflow is bad. Jason Cammerer 84
    • CMS IS THE ENTERPRISESOFTWARE THAT UX FORGOT 85
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    • BETTER CMS WORKFLOW 87
    • “Beautiful software, even for back-end users, isbecoming an expectation.We’re moving in this direction because we nowunderstand that better content managementsystems foster better content. —Matt Thompson http://www.poynter.org/how-tos/digital-strategies/134791/4-ways-content-management-systems-are-evolving-why-it-matters-to-journalists/ 88
    • FIRST:GREAT CONTENT DOESN’TJUST HAPPEN.
    • Enthusiasm and support typically derails when examining the resources and commitment required to produce regular content. Brian Solis, @briansolis 90
    • SECOND:WE’RE NOT MAKING CONTAINERS.WE’RE CREATING USEREXPERIENCES.
    • Build from the content out.Not from the container in. Jeremy Keith, @adactio 92
    • THIRD:IT’S TIME TO TAKE OUTTHE GARBAGE.
    • 80% of your content is crap. Paraphrase, @lukew 94
    • FOURTH:THE FUTURE OF CONTENTIS STRUCTURED.
    • The more structure you put into content the freer it will become. Rachel Lovinger, @rlovinger 96
    • THANKS!ROCK ON!@karenmcgranekaren@bondartscience.comwww.bondartscience.com+1 (917) 887-8149