FILE 1 C
ADVERBS
DEFINITION
Adverbs are words that modify:
•a verb (He drove slowly. — How did he
drive?)
•an adjective (He drove a very fa...
And…
• a whole sentence (Luckily, we didn’t
miss the plane).
• These ones are called comment or
sentence adverbs.
• Adverbs often tell us when, where,

why, or under what conditions (how)
something happens or happened.
• Adverbs frequen...
KINDS OF ADVERBS

• MANNER
   She moved slowly and spoke quietly.
• PLACE
   She has lived on the island all her
life.
   ...
• COMMENT adverbs: they give the
speaker’s opinion. e.g. Luckily, clearly,
obviously, apparently.
• DEGREE adverbs: they d...
POSITIONS OF ADVERBS
One of the characteristics of adverbs
is their ability to move around in a
sentence… (OMG!)
ADVERBS OF MANNER

• They are particularly flexible in this
regard.

• Solemnly the president addressed
her ministers.
• T...
ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY
• They usually come before the main verb:
I never get up before nine o'clock.
• Or between the auxili...
Cont. Frequency adverbs

• Sometimes, usually, normally,
occasionally can go at the beginning
of the sentence for emphasis...
ADVERBS OF DEGREE

• They normally go before an adjective
or an adverb. E.g Extremely/
incredible/ very.
• She’s extremely...
Cont. ADVERBS OF DEGREE

• A bit, a little, much and a lot, go
after a verb or expression:
• e.g. I read a little every da...
Cont. ADVERBS OF DEGREE

• Almost and nearly go before the main
verb:
• I have almost finished my homework.
• He nearly fe...
COMMENT ADVERBS
• They usually go at the beginning of a
sentence or clause.
• e.g. Apparently, she had to wait for
more th...
• Most other adverbs go in midposition (before the main verb).
• For example:
• I just need ten more minutes.
• She didn’t...
• Where’s Clara? -She’s probably gone
shopping.
• Do you often go to Paris? – Not
really, I’ve only been there twice.
• Vi...
ORDER OF ADVERBS

• There is a basic order in which
adverbs will appear when there is
more than one.
Beth swims enthusiastically in the pool
every morning before dawn.
Dad walks impatiently into town every
afternoon before ...
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Adv

  1. 1. FILE 1 C ADVERBS
  2. 2. DEFINITION Adverbs are words that modify: •a verb (He drove slowly. — How did he drive?) •an adjective (He drove a very fast car. — How fast was his car?) •another adverb (She moved quite slowly down the aisle. — How slowly did she move?)
  3. 3. And… • a whole sentence (Luckily, we didn’t miss the plane). • These ones are called comment or sentence adverbs.
  4. 4. • Adverbs often tell us when, where, why, or under what conditions (how) something happens or happened. • Adverbs frequently end in –ly. • However, many words and phrases not ending in -ly serve an adverbial function and an -ly ending is not a guarantee that a word is an adverb. The words lovely, lonely, motherly, friendly, lively, costly, for instance, are adjectives: e.g.That lovely woman has a friendly daughter.
  5. 5. KINDS OF ADVERBS • MANNER    She moved slowly and spoke quietly. • PLACE    She has lived on the island all her life.    She still lives there now. • FREQUENCY    She takes the boat to the mainland every day.    She often goes by herself. • TIME    She tries to get back before dark.    It's starting to get dark now.        She left early.
  6. 6. • COMMENT adverbs: they give the speaker’s opinion. e.g. Luckily, clearly, obviously, apparently. • DEGREE adverbs: they describe how much something is done or to modify an adjective. e.g. So, very, quite, really.
  7. 7. POSITIONS OF ADVERBS One of the characteristics of adverbs is their ability to move around in a sentence… (OMG!)
  8. 8. ADVERBS OF MANNER • They are particularly flexible in this regard. • Solemnly the president addressed her ministers. • The minister solemnly addressed her ministers. • The minister addressed her ministers solemnly. • They usually go after the verb or phrase.
  9. 9. ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY • They usually come before the main verb: I never get up before nine o'clock. • Or between the auxiliary verb and the main verb: I have rarely written to my brother without a good reason. • But they come before the verb used to: I always used to see him at his summer home. • And they go after the verb to be. He is always late.
  10. 10. Cont. Frequency adverbs • Sometimes, usually, normally, occasionally can go at the beginning of the sentence for emphasis. • E.g. Sometimes I have to do my homework after dinner.
  11. 11. ADVERBS OF DEGREE • They normally go before an adjective or an adverb. E.g Extremely/ incredible/ very. • She’s extremely talented. • He’s quite friendly.
  12. 12. Cont. ADVERBS OF DEGREE • A bit, a little, much and a lot, go after a verb or expression: • e.g. I read a little every day. Do you go out much?
  13. 13. Cont. ADVERBS OF DEGREE • Almost and nearly go before the main verb: • I have almost finished my homework. • He nearly fell over when he was coming down the stairs.
  14. 14. COMMENT ADVERBS • They usually go at the beginning of a sentence or clause. • e.g. Apparently, she had to wait for more than 2 hours. • Unfortunately, the weather was terrible during their trip.
  15. 15. • Most other adverbs go in midposition (before the main verb). • For example: • I just need ten more minutes. • She didn’t even say goodbye.
  16. 16. • Where’s Clara? -She’s probably gone shopping. • Do you often go to Paris? – Not really, I’ve only been there twice. • Virginia also went to the party.
  17. 17. ORDER OF ADVERBS • There is a basic order in which adverbs will appear when there is more than one.
  18. 18. Beth swims enthusiastically in the pool every morning before dawn. Dad walks impatiently into town every afternoon before supper.

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