Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Adv
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Adv

2,068

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,068
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
49
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. FILE 1 C ADVERBS
  • 2. DEFINITION Adverbs are words that modify: •a verb (He drove slowly. — How did he drive?) •an adjective (He drove a very fast car. — How fast was his car?) •another adverb (She moved quite slowly down the aisle. — How slowly did she move?)
  • 3. And… • a whole sentence (Luckily, we didn’t miss the plane). • These ones are called comment or sentence adverbs.
  • 4. • Adverbs often tell us when, where, why, or under what conditions (how) something happens or happened. • Adverbs frequently end in –ly. • However, many words and phrases not ending in -ly serve an adverbial function and an -ly ending is not a guarantee that a word is an adverb. The words lovely, lonely, motherly, friendly, lively, costly, for instance, are adjectives: e.g.That lovely woman has a friendly daughter.
  • 5. KINDS OF ADVERBS • MANNER    She moved slowly and spoke quietly. • PLACE    She has lived on the island all her life.    She still lives there now. • FREQUENCY    She takes the boat to the mainland every day.    She often goes by herself. • TIME    She tries to get back before dark.    It's starting to get dark now.        She left early.
  • 6. • COMMENT adverbs: they give the speaker’s opinion. e.g. Luckily, clearly, obviously, apparently. • DEGREE adverbs: they describe how much something is done or to modify an adjective. e.g. So, very, quite, really.
  • 7. POSITIONS OF ADVERBS One of the characteristics of adverbs is their ability to move around in a sentence… (OMG!)
  • 8. ADVERBS OF MANNER • They are particularly flexible in this regard. • Solemnly the president addressed her ministers. • The minister solemnly addressed her ministers. • The minister addressed her ministers solemnly. • They usually go after the verb or phrase.
  • 9. ADVERBS OF FREQUENCY • They usually come before the main verb: I never get up before nine o'clock. • Or between the auxiliary verb and the main verb: I have rarely written to my brother without a good reason. • But they come before the verb used to: I always used to see him at his summer home. • And they go after the verb to be. He is always late.
  • 10. Cont. Frequency adverbs • Sometimes, usually, normally, occasionally can go at the beginning of the sentence for emphasis. • E.g. Sometimes I have to do my homework after dinner.
  • 11. ADVERBS OF DEGREE • They normally go before an adjective or an adverb. E.g Extremely/ incredible/ very. • She’s extremely talented. • He’s quite friendly.
  • 12. Cont. ADVERBS OF DEGREE • A bit, a little, much and a lot, go after a verb or expression: • e.g. I read a little every day. Do you go out much?
  • 13. Cont. ADVERBS OF DEGREE • Almost and nearly go before the main verb: • I have almost finished my homework. • He nearly fell over when he was coming down the stairs.
  • 14. COMMENT ADVERBS • They usually go at the beginning of a sentence or clause. • e.g. Apparently, she had to wait for more than 2 hours. • Unfortunately, the weather was terrible during their trip.
  • 15. • Most other adverbs go in midposition (before the main verb). • For example: • I just need ten more minutes. • She didn’t even say goodbye.
  • 16. • Where’s Clara? -She’s probably gone shopping. • Do you often go to Paris? – Not really, I’ve only been there twice. • Virginia also went to the party.
  • 17. ORDER OF ADVERBS • There is a basic order in which adverbs will appear when there is more than one.
  • 18. Beth swims enthusiastically in the pool every morning before dawn. Dad walks impatiently into town every afternoon before supper.

×