Some facts and figures about JISC digitisation impact
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Some facts and figures about JISC digitisation impact

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The content of these slides (or better, the great majority of it) derives from an initial analysis of the results of a survey the JISC Content team circulated among previously funded projects in......

The content of these slides (or better, the great majority of it) derives from an initial analysis of the results of a survey the JISC Content team circulated among previously funded projects in the areas of digitisation and content. Comments to each slide have been incorporated into the slides, as they are quite extensive. The survey aimed to find out more about how digitised collections were being used and the impact such projects have had on their hosting institutions and more broadly.

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  • The content of these slides (or better, the great majority of it) derives from an initial analysis of the results of a survey the JISC Content team circulated among previously funded projects (since 2007) in the areas of digitisation and content, see all projects herehttp://www.jisc.ac.uk/digitisation. The survey aimed to find out more about how digitised collections were being used and the impact such projects have had on their hosting institutions and more broadly.
  • The JISC Content team developed the Toolkit for the Impact of Scholarly Digitised Resources (TIDSR) http://microsites.oii.ox.ac.uk/tidsrto provide some guidance to projects and their institutions on the range of qualitative and quantitative methods that can be used to gather data about usage and impact of digitised resources. The toolkit also contains case studies, reports, and a knowledge base with articles. This is now embedded within the JISC digitisation and content programmes. Many respondents to the survey used the approaches suggested in the toolkit to measure usage and impact. The survey was circulated to 103 projects and 62 responses were received. These slides contain only some high level findings. We are conducting a more thorough interpretation of the results which we plan to make available as soon as possible.
  • The survey asked both quantitative and qualitative questions about the digital collections that had been created or enhanced, how these collections were being used and what impact the JISC-funded work had had within institutions. As expected, a number of respondents just didn’t always have the information requested because they hadn’t necessarily been capturing the data, or because it wasn’t available to them (eg in the case of commercial partnerships). So, a disclaimer: these “stories” of impact represent only a partial picture, but one which however reveals some initial indicative patterns of impact and areas where concrete positive change has been identified and which we could pursue. We also looked at impact from the point of view of who is being affected by the change, what kind of indicators might be useful to consider in relation to different stakeholders, recognising that there are not always clear boundaries among the different stakeholders affected and that over time some stakeholders maybe affected in different degrees.
  • Responses to the survey highlighted that the great majority of collections that have been digitised or clustered are now embedded in courses. This ranges from being embedded in courses within the institution that created the digital collections (the majority of cases), to being part of courses within other institutions in the UK, with some embedded within courses internationally. It was clear that that respondents were not always aware of the extent to which collections were embedded, so instances of collections being embedded into courses could actually be greater.Higher attainment: quote from lecturer at the University of Manchester. The John Rylands Library digitised medieval manuscripts as part of the “In the begynning” project http://bit.ly/RSVJJ8 . The collection is delivered through the Library’s digital collections platform http://enriqueta.man.ac.uk/luna/servlet/Man4MedievalVC~4~4Other respondents to the survey also mentioned that students achieved better quality results when engaging with digitised content from special collections, eg resources such as HISTPOP (Historical Online Population Reports) http://www.histpop.org and STEM WISHEES (STEM Writing in Schools Higher Education and Employment Settings) http://www.thinkingwriting.qmul.ac.uk/wisheesStudents attainments level seems a useful indicator of the positive change that a digital resource can bring about.Digital literacy: interaction with digital collections also contributes to developing digital literacy skills. The “Connected Histories” project http://www.connectedhistories.org/set up a students placement and as part of their work students had to blog http://connectedhistories.tumblr.com/ about their use of the collection. The researchers of tomorrow’s report highlighted how researchers need more training in information seeking skills http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education-network/blog/2012/jul/11/researchers-of-tomorrow-report.Employment opportunities: a number of projects have offered students paid work placements, which have provided them with opportunities to increase their technical knowledge and skills and also get a flavour for what it means to work in a particular industry. The quote on the slide is from a video (http://bit.ly/zandravideo) produced by the Zandra Rhodes Digital Study Collection project http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/digitisation/content2011_2013/ZandraRhodes.aspxwhich features students working in the studio of fashion designer Zandra Rhodes to help digitise her collection of garments and sketches.
  • Direct impact on research was more difficult to establish, there was less data available from respondents, and perhaps it’s more difficult to identify indicators. Traditional indicators such as published articles and citations presented some problems, eg: the long lead time for papers to be published (some projects had launched relatively recently and wouldn’t expect to have made an impact on research publications yet); digital resources don’t always offer downloadable citations making it difficult to track citations at a later stage; academics still tend to cite the paper-based version of a resource even if they consult the digital version; some projects simply did not have that information because they never sought to track it. Research outputs: these figures which refer to the JISC-funded 19th C Pamphlets projects based at the University of Southampton were published in the Guardian Higher Education Network blog http://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education-network/blog/2012/jul/09/university-of-southampton-library-digitising-resources (not the JISC survey). The collection is delivered via JSTOR http://about.jstor.org/content/19th-century-british-pamphlets.New research methods: The availability of large corpuses of digital data allows more sophisticated ways of interrogating such data and conducting research than previously possible, as Prof Peter Ainsworth states in One Culture, CLIR, http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub151/pub151.pdf p 22, the evaluation report for phase one of the Digging into Data challenges programme, which JISC supported with other partners http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/digitisation/diggingintodata.aspx.Research funding: a number of respondents revealed that the experience gained and outputs created though their digitisation/content project provided the basis for obtaining further funding for other research projects, whether at national or international level. One example of this is the GrassPortal project http://www.grassportal.org, University of Sheffield.
  • Projects involving digitisation of content and related activities bring benefits not only to primary users of that content but also to institutions at strategic level and to the whole of the HE sector, and beyond. Skills, strategy and infrastructures89% of respondents to the survey said that through JISC funding their team/institution increased its digital capacity and infrastructure so that it is now in a better position to create and sustain digital content in the future. 76% of respondents also felt working on the project had a positive impact on relationships within their institution such as through collaborative working or working more effectively.95% of respondents said the funding allowed the team/Principal Investigator to increase their knowledge and skills in creation and management of digitised content.Increasing profileInstitutions increased their profile through various means, including local and national press coverage, conference presentations, social media and dissemination activities within their own interest area/networks. Profile raising activities generated increased use of collections and requests to use digitised items commercially, thus leading to income streams; new partnerships; project/institution being held as example of good practice in a specific area; institutions using digitised collection as a way of showcasing a USP in international recruitment.The Digitised Diseases project http://barc.sls.brad.ac.uk/3dbones/ at the University of Bradford has been able to attract international students after building up an international reputation for their work on 3D digitisation of human remains.Income and savingsOnly a minority of projects have developed income streams from their collection, with the majority never setting up to do this. However, many respondents highlighted how JISC funding contributed to achieving efficiencies through internal cost savings, and that other types of non-financial benefits were achieved . Reduced costs to users for consulting digitised material was also mentioned as part of “financial benefits”. For example, the British Library Sound Archive http://sounds.bl.uk/: digitised 42,000 fully documented sound recording files. Estimated 12m page views since 2007. Based on institutional fees for paid subscription archives, estimated value is £2700 x 280 institutions = £756,000 p.a.Earth Town Construction Update as on 30th July 2011http://www.flickr.com/photos/earthinfrastructure/6004632877/
  • Digitisation and digital content creation/curation activities provide opportunities for institutions to deliver their business and community engagement agenda in innovative ways often through partnerships within and outside the HE sector, including private organisations. Widening participation: 89% of respondents to the survey said that their project allowed them to develop partnerships with other institutions/organisations that benefited their institution. 89% also felt that the projects allowed them to build, or further develop, new partnerships with academics and researchers.Projects within the JISC Developing community content programme http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/digitisation/communitycontent.aspx and the eContentprogramme 2011, Strand B: developing community collections http://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/digitisation/econtent11.aspx have deliberately engaged with communities outside of the Higher Education sector. The benefits identified by these projects include: strengthening strategic links between HE institutions and local communities; access to special collections outside of the HE sector; more digitisation of content or enhancing existing digital content; skills development and exchange; mutual promotional opportunities. (Screen grab from World of Kays project http://www.worldofkays.org/)Open innovation: the Old Weather project http://www.oldweather.org/produced a digital interface to engage volunteers from the general public to transcribe WW1 Royal Navy ships’ logs to aid scientists in research on climate change. Scientists alone could have never done this type of work. The project terminated recently but as in previous projects run by the same team, it is likely that the team will produced scientific papers co-authored with citizens who contributed to the transcription of the log books. Best practice: a useful indicator of impact is the degree to which approaches developed by one project are adopted by others within or outside the sector. The model for collecting and digitising items belonging to the general public through roadshaws which was developed by the Great War Archive http://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ww1lit/gwa/was emulated by Europeanahttp://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en resulting in collection days gathering WW1 related material being held across Europe.

Transcript

  • 1. Some facts andfigures on JISCdigi impactPaola Marchionni, Digitisation Programme Manager, p.marchionni@jisc.ac.uk@paolamarchionniPeter Findlay, Digitisation Programme Manager, p.findlay@jisc.ac.uk@PFindlayJISC
  • 2. [Notes on slide 1]The content of these slides (or better, the great majority of it) derives from an initial analysis of the results ofa survey the JISC Content team circulated among previously funded projects (since 2007) in the areas ofdigitisation and content, see all projects here http://www.jisc.ac.uk/digitisation.The survey aimed to find out more about how digitised collections were being used and the impact suchprojects have had on their hosting institutions and more broadly.
  • 3. Some toolsTIDSR - http://microsites.oii.ox.ac.uk/tidsr/Content projects survey slide 3
  • 4. [Notes on slide 3]The JISC Content team developed the Toolkit for the Impact of Scholarly Digitised Resources (TIDSR)http://microsites.oii.ox.ac.uk/tidsr to provide some guidance to projects and their institutions on the rangeof qualitative and quantitative methods that can be used to gather data about usage and impact of digitisedresources. The toolkit also contains case studies, reports, and a knowledge base with articles. This is nowembedded within the JISC digitisation and content programmes. Many respondents to the survey used theapproaches suggested in the toolkit to measure usage and impact.The survey was circulated to 103 projects and 62 responses were received. These slides contain only somehigh level findings. We are conducting a more thorough interpretation of the results which we plan to makeavailable as soon as possible.
  • 5. Stories ofimpact…impact forwhom? slide 5
  • 6. [Notes on slide 5]The survey asked both quantitative and qualitative questions about the digital collections that had beencreated or enhanced, how these collections were being used and what impact the JISC-funded work had hadwithin institutions. As expected, a number of respondents didn’t always have the information requestedbecause they hadn’t necessarily been capturing the data, or because it wasn’t available to them (eg in thecase of commercial partnerships).So, a disclaimer: these “stories” of impact represent only a partial picture, but one which however revealssome initial indicative patterns of impact and areas where concrete positive change has been identified andwhich we could pursue.We also looked at impact from the point of view of who is being affected by the change, what kind ofindicators might be useful to consider in relation to different stakeholders, recognising that there are notalways clear boundaries among the different stakeholders affected and that over time some stakeholdersmaybe affected in different degrees.
  • 7. Students 84% of respondents said digi collections are embedded in courses – 16% don’t knowHigher attainment Digital literacy Employment opportunities“all students using manuscripts students trialling different searches- “great to work with Zandra, with a realin an English language course information seeking skills design team… getting to know what itgot first-class degrees” could be like in the industry” slide 7
  • 8. [Notes on slide 7]Responses to the survey highlighted that the great majority of collections that have been digitised or clustered arenow embedded in courses. This ranges from being embedded in courses within the institution that created thedigital collections (the majority of cases), to being part of courses within other institutions in the UK, with someembedded within courses internationally. It was clear that that respondents were not always aware of the extentto which collections were embedded, so instances of collections being embedded into courses could actually begreater.Higher attainment: quote from lecturer at the University of Manchester. The John Rylands Library digitisedmedieval manuscripts as part of the “In the begynning” project http://bit.ly/RSVJJ8 . The collection is deliveredthrough the Library’s digital collections platform http://enriqueta.man.ac.uk/luna/servlet/Man4MedievalVC~4~4Other respondents to the survey also mentioned that students achieved better quality results when engaging withdigitised content from special collections, eg resources such as HISTPOP (Historical Online Population Reports)http://www.histpop.org and STEM WISHEES (STEM Writing in Schools Higher Education and Employment Settings)http://www.thinkingwriting.qmul.ac.uk/wisheesStudents attainments level seems a useful indicator of the positive change that a digital resource can bring about.Digital literacy: interaction with digital collections also contributes to developing digital literacy skills. The“Connected Histories” project http://www.connectedhistories.org/ set up a students placement and as part oftheir work students had to blog http://connectedhistories.tumblr.com/ about their use of the collection. Theresearchers of tomorrow’s report highlighted how researchers need more training in information seeking skillshttp://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education-network/blog/2012/jul/11/researchers-of-tomorrow-report.Employment opportunities: a number of projects have offered students paid work placements, which haveprovided them with opportunities to increase their technical knowledge and skills and also get a flavour for whatit means to work in a particular industry. The quote on the slide is from a video (http://bit.ly/zandravideo)produced by the Zandra Rhodes Digital Study Collection projecthttp://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/digitisation/content2011_2013/ZandraRhodes.aspx whichfeatures students working in the studio of fashion designer Zandra Rhodes to help digitise her collection ofgarments and sketches.
  • 9. ResearchersResearch outputs, New research methods Research fundingcitations “We’re discovering research GrassPortal secured EC questions that we didn’t have funding of 350 Euros to“…19th C pamphlets when we started” Prof Peter work on sustainablecollection had around 51,800 Ainsworth development of perennialPDF downloads and over 4,380 grasses as biofuel crop.citation captures” Dr Julian Ball
  • 10. [Notes on slide 9]Direct impact on research was more difficult to establish, there was less data available from respondents, andperhaps it’s more difficult to identify indicators. Traditional indicators such as published articles andcitations presented some problems, eg: the long lead time for papers to be published (some projects hadlaunched relatively recently and wouldn’t expect to have made an impact on research publications yet);digital resources don’t always offer downloadable citations making it difficult to track citations at a laterstage; academics still tend to cite the paper-based version of a resource even if they consult the digitalversion; some projects simply did not have that information because they never sought to track it.Research outputs: these figures which refer to the JISC-funded 19th C Pamphlets projects based at theUniversity of Southampton were published in the Guardian Higher Education Network bloghttp://www.guardian.co.uk/higher-education-network/blog/2012/jul/09/university-of-southampton-library-digitising-resources (not the JISC survey). The collection is delivered via JSTORhttp://about.jstor.org/content/19th-century-british-pamphlets.New research methods: The availability of large corpuses of digital data allows more sophisticated ways ofinterrogating such data and conducting research than previously possible, as Prof Peter Ainsworth states inOne Culture, CLIR, http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub151/pub151.pdf p 22, the evaluation report forphase one of the Digging into Data challenges programme, which JISC supported with other partnershttp://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/digitisation/diggingintodata.aspx.Research funding: a number of respondents revealed that the experience gained and outputs created thoughtheir digitisation/content project provided the basis for obtaining further funding for other research projects,whether at national or international level. One example of this is the GrassPortal projecthttp://www.grassportal.org, University of Sheffield.
  • 11. Institutions 90% developed a more strategic approach to digiSkills, strategy and Increasing profile Income and savingsinfrastructure 84% said project enabled to increase 72% attracted further project89% said project allowed inst profile of own collection/institution. funding. British Library Soundto increase capacity and Uni of Bradford attracted American Archive calculated aninfrastructure to create and MA students thanks to their profile estimated saving to thesustain digitised content in 3D digitisation of human remains HE sector of about £756,000 slide 11
  • 12. [Notes on slide 11]Projects involving digitisation of content and related activities bring benefits not only to primary users of thatcontent but also to institutions at strategic level and to the whole of the HE sector, and beyond.Skills, strategy and infrastructures89% of respondents to the survey said that through JISC funding their team/institution increased its digitalcapacity and infrastructure so that it is now in a better position to create and sustain digital content in the future.76% of respondents also felt working on the project had a positive impact on relationships within their institutionsuch as through collaborative working or working more effectively.95% of respondents said the funding allowed the team/Principal Investigator to increase their knowledge andskills in creation and management of digitised content.Increasing profileInstitutions increased their profile through various means, including local and national press coverage,conference presentations, social media and dissemination activities within their own interest area/networks.Profile raising activities generated increased use of collections and requests to use digitised items commercially,thus leading to income streams; new partnerships; project/institution being held as example of good practice in aspecific area; institutions using digitised collection as a way of showcasing a USP in international recruitment.The Digitised Diseases project http://barc.sls.brad.ac.uk/3dbones/ at the University of Bradford has been able toattract international students after building up an international reputation for their work on 3D digitisation ofhuman remains.Income and savingsOnly a minority of projects have developed income streams from their collection, with the majority never settingup to do this. However, many respondents highlighted how JISC funding contributed to achieving efficienciesthrough internal cost savings, and that other types of non-financial benefits were achieved . Reduced costs tousers for consulting digitised material was also mentioned as part of “financial benefits”.For example, the British Library Sound Archive http://sounds.bl.uk/: digitised 42,000 fully documented soundrecording files. Based on institutional fees for paid subscription archives, estimated value is £2700 x 280institutions = £756,000 p.a.
  • 13. CommunitiesWidening participation Open innovation Best practice89% of respondents said project Crowdsourcing employed as The Great War Archive modelallowed them to develop partnerships digitisation and research was replicated nationally andwith institutions/organisations methodology. Old Weather internationally by Europeanathat benefited their own institution project :1m log book pages transcribed, 28k volunteers slide 13
  • 14. [Notes on slide 13]Digitisation and digital content creation/curation activities provide opportunities for institutions to delivertheir business and community engagement agenda in innovative ways often through partnerships within andoutside the HE sector, including private organisations.Widening participation: 89% of respondents to the survey said that their project allowed them to developpartnerships with other institutions/organisations that benefited their institution. 89% also felt that theprojects allowed them to build, or further develop, new partnerships with academics and researchers.Projects within the JISC Developing community content programmehttp://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/digitisation/communitycontent.aspx and the eContentprogramme 2011, Strand B: developing community collectionshttp://www.jisc.ac.uk/whatwedo/programmes/digitisation/econtent11.aspx have deliberately engaged withcommunities outside of the Higher Education sector. The benefits identified by these projects include:strengthening strategic links between HE institutions and local communities; access to special collectionsoutside of the HE sector; more digitisation of content or enhancing existing digital content; skillsdevelopment and exchange; mutual promotional opportunities. (Screen grab from World of Kays projecthttp://www.worldofkays.org/)Open innovation: the Old Weather project http://www.oldweather.org/ produced a digital interface to engagevolunteers from the general public to transcribe WW1 Royal Navy ships’ logs to aid scientists in research onclimate change. Scientists alone could have never done this type of work. The project terminated recently butas in previous projects run by the same team, it is likely that the team will produced scientific papers co-authored with citizens who contributed to the transcription of the log books.Best practice: a useful indicator of impact is the degree to which approaches developed by one project areadopted by others within or outside the sector. The model for collecting and digitising items belonging to thegeneral public through roadshows which was developed by the Great War Archivehttp://www.oucs.ox.ac.uk/ww1lit/gwa/ was emulated by Europeana http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/en resulting in collection days gathering WW1 related material being held across Europe.
  • 15. Next stepThe JISC Content team is analysing the results of the survey in amore comprehensive way.Once analysis is complete we will publish a fuller report on thesurvey results.The findings of the survey will feed into future JISC activity in thearea of digitisation and content and impact assessment moregenerally. slide 15
  • 16. CreditsAll images are web site screen grabs apart form:Slide 9, from left to right:Image 1: ChemConnector http://www.flickr.com/photos/26814164@N05/6003727019/ -Image2: University of Maryland: http://www.flickr.com/photos/umdnews/5985718936Image3: Dave Gray: http://www.flickr.com/photos/davegray/3210489602/ -Slide 11: from left to right :Image 1: Earth Infrastructures http://www.flickr.com/photos/earthinfrastructure/6004632877/ Apart from images on slides 9 and 11 slide 16