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Final Submissions for my 509 organizational experience. They include: a project/process report, a new organizational chart, a stakeholder analysis, a communications plan, a situational analysis ...

Final Submissions for my 509 organizational experience. They include: a project/process report, a new organizational chart, a stakeholder analysis, a communications plan, a situational analysis report, and a strategic plan.

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     509 Organizational Experience 509 Organizational Experience Document Transcript

    • PA 509 Organizational Experience Report Amanda Phillips Summer 2012 Faculty Advisor: Dr. Kaimanu 509 Faculty Advisor: Dr. Gelmon Field Organization: PATH for womenField Supervisors: Jamie Ross, PhD and Torrie Fields, MPH
    • Table of ContentsList of Acronyms ................................................................................................................................. iiProject Overview .................................................................................................................................. 1Organizational Setting .......................................................................................................................... 1Learning Objectives and Tasks ............................................................................................................ 3Work Processes and Outcomes ............................................................................................................ 6Objective #1: Enhance Stakeholder Identification and Management Skills ........................................ 9 Stakeholder Identification and Information Gathering.................................................................. 10 Stakeholder Categorization and Creation of a Stakeholder Table................................................. 11 Stakeholder Prioritization and Analysis of the Stakeholder Table ................................................ 13 Stakeholder Management: Recommendations/Implications ......................................................... 14Objective #2: Strengthen Strategic Communication Skills ............................................................... 17 Solicit Internal Buy-in and Communications Audit ...................................................................... 19 Creation of Communication Content, Tools, and Templates ........................................................ 20 Project Coordination...................................................................................................................... 21 Organizational Strategic Communications Plan ............................................................................ 22 Strategic Communication: Outcomes and Recommendations ...................................................... 23Objectives # 3 & 4: Enhance Applied Skills in Situational Analyses and Develop Competencies inStrategic Planning .............................................................................................................................. 26 Identify Organizational Mandates ................................................................................................. 26 Assess the External and Internal Environment and Strategic Issues ............................................. 27 Formulate Strategies to Manage the Issues, Review and Adopt a Strategic Plan, and Develop anImplementation Process ..................................................................................................................... 28 Outcomes and Recommendations ................................................................................................. 29Conclusion.......................................................................................................................................... 30Bibliography ....................................................................................................................................... 31 Page | i
    • List of AcronymsCWH – Center for Women’s HealthOHSU – Oregon Health and Sciences UniversityPATH for women – Policy Advisory Toward Health for womenPSU – Portland State UniversityWGSS – Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department Intentionally Blank Page | ii
    • Project OverviewOrganizational Setting Policy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women is a small non-profit and has threeemployees. They are Michelle Berlin M.D., M.P.H. (Director of Research), Jamie Ross, PhD (Co-Director of Outreach), and Torrie Fields, MPH, Co-Director of Outreach). Michelle Berlin M.D.,M.P.H. an Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU) physician, and researcher, foundedPATH for women in 2004. PATH for women was a response to the critical need for current,evidence-based information concerning women’s health for use toward policy implementation andit is now a strategic partnership between the OHSU Center for Women’s Health (CWH) andPortland State University’s (PSU) Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department (WGSS).PATH for women’s revised mission is to provide accurate, high-quality community driven research,data, and analysis to inform women’s health policy and to serve as an independent source of data,analysis, and coalition capacity-building for the public, advocates, and policymakers. PATH for women has expanded from its original emphasis on creating and translatingscientific research to inform women’s health policy to include coalition capacity building andcommunity outreach. As a result, PATH for women has two divisions (see Appendix A). Onefocuses on research and the other focuses on outreach. The outreach division is housed at WGSSand it aims to develop meaningful relationships with interested community members, communityorganizations, public health professionals, educators, and policymakers regarding issues facingwomen in Oregon, such as Women with Diabetes and Women with First Trimester Prenatal Care.The outreach division draws its evidenced-based health related information from the Making theGrade on Women’s Health: A National and State-by-State Report Card (Report Card). Page | 1
    • The Report Card has been published since 2000. The 5th edition, and most current Report Cardevaluates 34 health status and 68 health policy indicators and assesses progress in reaching keybenchmarks and policy objectives for each state and for the nation as a whole. For example,according to the Report Card Oregon is currently demonstrating a failing grade in two indicators:Women with Diabetes and Women with First Trimester Prenatal Care. The research division is housed in CWH where Michelle is a lead author of theaforementioned Report Card (see http://hrc.nwlc.org/). The research division aims to serve as anational and regional resource for data analysis, including the provision of accurate and currentresearch concerning women’s health and evidence-based analysis of key issues that specificallyaffect efficiency, cost, and outcomes of the health of women. Since 2004, the outreach division ofPATH for women has:  Identified key areas in womens health with policy impact and developed materials for use by community groups, local organizations, and the public to influence policy development and implementation  Interpreted the results of health studies for policymakers, the media, and the public  Analyzed and translated existing evidence-based research for the public and policymakers Intentionally Blank Page | 2
    • Learning Objectives and TasksObjective #1: Enhance stakeholder identification and management skills  Ensure integrity of the current data on potential stakeholders by querying the database and cross referencing the data with publicly available information  Facilitate brainstorming session with staff to identify additional stakeholders  Perform a literature review to gain a better understanding of feminist stakeholder prioritization methodologies  Categorize stakeholders based on their type and interest in health disparities  Prioritize stakeholders using a unique scorecard that focuses less on power rankings and resource level and more on relationships and those who are most vulnerable to PATH for women’s objectives  Analyze the data and develop recommendations  Write stakeholder analysis report that synthesizes the literature review, key themes, the data analysis, and recommendations  Present report to staffEvidence: Written stakeholder analysis reportObjective #2: Strengthen strategic communication skills  Collaborate continuously with key internal stakeholders to determine requirements and gather past content to develop effective communication materials and strategies  Create and/or edit content for the web and promotional materials including PATH for womens story: the history of the program and a narrative that establishes the need for the program, e-mail communiques, fact sheets, and presentations to help prepare PATH for women to recruit champions and partners and communicate with external stakeholders  Develop a needs assessment and other outreach tools such as invitation letters for an advisory committee and coalitions around diabetes and first trimester prenatal care Page | 3
    •  Establish communication channels and processes by creating an outreach and communications plan that establishes clear policies on communication practices and procedures, such as outreach efforts (e.g., goals, target audiences, key messages, strategies, tools, intended outcomes, and the means to evaluate results), frequency of communications, brand editorial standards, rules around print and electronic communications, approval for institutional facts and messaging, and expected response for internal and external concerns  Source and manage the efforts of a graphic artist and marketing consultant to design products such as a logo, graphic standards, stationary templates, and communication templates, such as project worksheets  Help facilitate and coordinate PATH for women’s transition to a website dedicated to its organization  Write report synthesizing internal stakeholder engagement efforts and recommendationsEvidence: Strategic communications plan and report, including the recommendations, tools,standards, and a synthesis of internal stakeholder engagement efforts and the website transitionprocessObjective #3: Enhance applied skills in situational analyses  Conduct a literature review and Internet search to find comparable organizations and determine strategies that have been successful for these organizations  Review, revise, and/or develop PATH for womens mission, vision, and values  Facilitate a brainstorming session with PATH for women staff and conduct a SWOT analysis  Draft situational analysis report  Discuss results of SWOT and situational analysis with PATH for women staff and gain feedback  Revise and finalize situational analysisEvidence: The SWOT, situational analysis, and a report summarizing the literature review, and theprocess of developing/revising the mission, vision, and values Page | 4
    • Objective #4: Develop competencies in strategic planning  Solicit internal stakeholder input for the strategic planning process through facilitated meetings, and gather and review past PATH for women communication with external stakeholders and prior strategic plans  Synthesize results and draft a report  Use the report to craft recommendations for revised goals, strategies, and objectives  Develop a strategic plan and create an action plan including budget, tasks, roles, scheduling, and metrics to reflect accomplishments and adjustments to the PATH for women’s priorities  Solicit additional feedback from PATH for women staff and edit the strategic plan as necessary  Present final strategic plan to PATH for women staffEvidence: Comprehensive strategic plan, including a list of stakeholders, a copy of the presentationmaterials used to communicate the results of the project, and the report synthesizing the strategicplanning processObjective #5: Integrate and apply what has been learned in the curriculum during theorganizational experience, identify future career directions, and articulate potential ongoingprofessional development needs.  Engage in reflection activities through the organizational experience.  Document personal progress toward both career goals and learning objectives  Prepare the required reflective papersEvidence: Reflective paper, portfolio, and presentation slides Page | 5
    • Work Processes and Outcomes My 509 project was to create a strategic plan and an outreach and communications plan tohelp these efforts. My supervisors were Dr. Jamie Ross, an assistant professor at PSU, and TorrieFields, MPH who are the co- directors and progenitors of PATH for womens outreach andadvocacy division. Therefore, their guidance and input was integral to the success of this 509project and they were required members of the strategic planning work team. I also worked Dr.Berlin, the founder of PATH for women and director of its research division. Dr. Berlin offeredinsight into the origins of the organization and shared her vision for its future. As my 509 project progressed, I had to revise my objectives and tasks. For example, asdiscussed below, PATH for women requested that I apply feminist methodologies and frameworksduring the stakeholder analysis instead of the traditional approaches that I had anticipated. Anothermodification to my initial work occurred after the staff reviewed the drafts of the stakeholderanalysis, strategic plan, and communications plan. They determined that while the analysis andplans were sound, and reflected their initial goal of forming coalitions, that they did not have theorganizational capacity for successful implementation and that poor implementation would reflectpoorly on the organization. As a result, I shifted my focus to creating a framework that allowedPATH for women to support existing coalitions. The revised objectives, work processes, andoutcomes associated with them are as follows. In addition, my initial action plan and a detailedmeeting log are included in Appendix B. At the start of the project, I suggested that we utilize the strategic planning frameworkdescribed by John M. Bryson (2004) in Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations.The work team was amenable so I also adapted the strategic planning worksheets from Bryson’s(2005) Creating and implementing your strategic plan: a workbook for public and nonprofitorganizations. This process framework is captured in Figure 1. Page | 6
    • Figure 1: Ten Step Strategic Planning ProcessSource: Bryson, J. M. (2004). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations: a guide to strengthening andsustaining organizational achievement (3 ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Page | 7
    • Figure 1 can be summarized into a 10-step process that helped guide our actions throughout the 509project. These steps identified by Bryson (2004) are: 1. Initiate and agree on a strategic planning process; 2. Identify organizational mandates; 3. Clarify organizational mission and values; 4. Assess the external and internal environments to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; 5. Identify the strategic issues facing the organization; 6. Formulate strategies to manage the issues; 7. Review and adopt the strategies or strategic plan; 8. Establish an effective organizational vision; 9. Develop an effective implementation process; and 10. Reassess the strategies and the strategic planning process (pp. 33-34).We did not follow these steps verbatim. For example, we believed that it was more beneficial toestablish the vision for PATH for women while we were clarifying its mission and values. Inaddition, the first step “initiate and agree” occurred during the drafting of the project contract.Furthermore, Bryson’s (2004) framework and steps are incredibly dense. I ultimately decided tocreate objective friendly process maps that expanded these 10-steps into actionable andapproachable sequences. Nevertheless, this framework shaped our approach to each of the above-mentioned objectives. Page | 8
    • Lastly, while developing my project I realized that facilitating meetings and brainstormingsessions would be critical to my success. An Institute for Media, Policy and Civil Societyhandbook; Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations: A Guide To Strengtheningand Sustaining Organizational Achievement by John Bryson; and Strategic Planning for Public andNonprofit Organizations: A Guide to Strengthening and Sustaining Organizational Achievement bySally Patterson and Janel Radtke (2009) helped me conduct these sessions effectively.Objective #1: Enhance Stakeholder Identification and ManagementSkills By third quarter 2013, PATH for women would like to forge strategic partnerships withcoalitions that address two issues: improving the health of women and their children during the firsttrimester, and preventing and improving care for women with diabetes. PATH for women will alignwith these existing coalitions, and support them by assisting with the recruitment of potentialcoalition members, translating research upon request, and training coalition members on how to usequalitative data to support their policy initiatives. PATH for women’s staff plan to identify the appropriate coalitions as part of their duties.Therefore, this stakeholder analysis supports PATH for women’s goal by identifying andprioritizing potential coalition members that PATH for women can recruit for the existingcoalitions. The narrative below outlines the tasks that each group member completed, and figure 2contains a process map. Page | 9
    • Figure 2: Stakeholder Analysis Process Stakeholder Identification Document and Monitor and Categorize Evaluate Stakeholders Analyze and Engage Prioritze Stakeholders Stakeholders Develop Strategies to Manage StakeholdersStakeholder Identification and Information Gathering The identification and information gathering process was similar to step #2 of the Bryson(2004) framework and it relied on PATH for women’s prior knowledge and secondary information.Specifically, PATH for women previously reviewed organizational websites, advocacy reports, andannual summaries and used the information to create a matrix of organizations that were linked tothe Report Card indicators. I then compiled a list of stakeholders/potential coalition members foreach coalition (see Appendix C) by focusing on organizations that were linked to indicators relatedto each issue. For example, organizations that were linked to the nutrition and obesity indicatorswere included in the list of stakeholders for the diabetes coalition. Next, I reviewed eachorganization’s current strategic objectives and goals to determine if the organization was stillaligned with the issue, and used their website to develop the contact list. Page | 10
    • There are some limitations to this method. The websites and reports can be outdated andorganizational interests may have changed, but these sources are excellent for an initial report andthis method was most appropriate for PATH for women’s strategic planning timeline. Nevertheless,to increase the efficacy of the stakeholder analysis process PATH for women must integrateadditional steps such as a needs assessment. As a result, the work group developed a needsassessment (see Appendix C) that PATH for women will use in the future to gain primary data onstakeholder interests. PATH for women will also use this data to revise this report and futurestakeholder analyses.Stakeholder Categorization and Creation of a Stakeholder Table First, the work group brainstormed and defined the stakeholder characteristics. Traditionalcharacteristics include resources, power, leadership, and interests (Bryson, 2004a; Bryson, 2004b;Schmeer, 1999). Once these characteristics are defined, stakeholders are then ranked in a tablebased on their positions within these categories. Analytical tools associated with thesecharacteristics include the power versus interest grids, numerical rankings e.g., 3, 2 ,1 with 1 beingnone and 3 being a lot, or the common rankings yes or no and high, medium, low (Bryson, 2004a;Bryson, 2004b; Schmeer, 1999). At this initial work session, PATH for women indicated that such traditional characteristicswere not suitable for its purposes. Instead, PATH for women wanted me to focus on characteristicsthat align with its mission and its values, which incorporate feminist ideologies. In other words,PATH for women wanted a unique scorecard that focuses less on power rankings and resourcelevels, and more on relationships, stakeholder needs, and those who would be affected the most bythe coaltions that they support. Page | 11
    • As a result, I conducted a literature review (see Appendix C). Based on the literature reviewI developed a draft list of characteristics, and created a stakeholder table. I populated the table withthe identified stakeholders, contact information, and the draft characteristics. For example, based onSchmeer (1999), one of my sources, I categorized the stakeholders into the following sectorsnonprofit (nongovernmental organizations, foundations, grassroots community organizations);commercial/private for profit organizations; and public or government departments or programs.In accordance with Schmeer (1999) I also ensured that stakeholders from differentdepartments/administrative areas and geographic locations were included even if they were from thesame organization. Furthermore, I included sectors research programs and organizations, and tradeassociations. Hospital-based research programs and organizational sectors are important becausestakeholders/potential coalition members, such as the Kaiser Permanente Center for HealthResearch are neither community organizations, nor direct service providers. The trade associationssector was important because some nonprofits are uniquely focused on the needs of theprofessionals who deliver services. These stakeholders help shape healthcare in Oregon, but theyare not tied primarily to a single issue. Lobbying capability/intent was important because some organizations may have theexperience with and the resources to create and advocate for policy positions. These organizationsare also important because they can share their experiences and help guide the consensus buildingand policy development process. The level of reporting/focus was important because anorganization’s grant funding and mission are strongly linked to improving health outcomesassociated with diabetes or first trimester prenatal care would more than likely show a higher levelof interest in becoming a coalition member. Page | 12
    • The group felt that the direct health services providers were of particular importancebecause they have access to qualitative data e.g., case studies that would help supplement thequantitative and research data that PATH for women can access through its connection with CWH.The size of the organization was important because size affects an organization’s flexibility; itshapes organizational culture and is often times an adequate predictor of organizational capacity.Lastly, a focus on socio-demographic issues is important because the Report Card has demonstratedthat states, including Oregon, have significant health disparities and women suffer from thesedisparities on multiple levels. Furthermore, the overall U.S. female population suffers from lowerhealth outcomes, but women of differing racial/ethnic populations, geographic populations, andsocioeconomic class face even more risks to their health. Reducing these gaps and improving thehealth of all women aligns with PATH for women’s vision. PATH for women’s staff then reviewed a final draft of the suggested table, and ultimatelythe work group agreed to the stakeholder characteristics that are defined in Appendix C. In addition,Appendix C includes instructions for completing the stakeholder table and the populatedstakeholder table. Each of the characteristics defined therein reflect the different roles that thesestakeholders play, and the perspectives they can bring to the coalitions.Stakeholder Prioritization and Analysis of the Stakeholder TableI identified a list of 68 stakeholders for the diabetes coalition and 31 stakeholders for the firsttrimester prenatal care coalition. Each stakeholder was then scored. The characteristics wereassigned a numerical value  Yes = 1 and No = 01  High = 3, Medium = 2, and Low = 11 Except for the rural versus urban category where Yes = 2 and No = 0. Page | 13
    • The total number of indicators that each organization addressed through its strategic plans or currentprogramming was also added to the individual scores. The sample size was not large enough formore sophisticated statistical analyses. For example, an attempt to take the top 30% of stakeholdersin each category revealed that there is only one trade association, and that all of the governmentorganizations are large organizations. Nevertheless, there are steps that PATH for women could taketo ensure that its initial outreach efforts are balanced. For instance, it would make sense for PATHfor women to invite organizations that may not have been in the top 10 for each issue. For example,stakeholders from rural areas may be of more interest than those from urban areas despite theirscore. A complete analysis of the data is available in Appendix C.Stakeholder Management: Recommendations/ImplicationsThis stakeholder analysis is only valuable if PATH for women leverages the results and creates astakeholder management process. Therefore, stakeholder management should be continual, and thestakeholder analysis should be updated regularly so that PATH for women can continue to identifynew stakeholders, changes to current stakeholders, and new information that current managementefforts produce. The Clarkson Centre for Business Ethics (1999), also outlines seven principles ofstakeholder management that PATH for women should incorporate in its management processes.(See Appendix C for a detailed discussion of these principles). Page | 14
    • The literature review mentioned above (and contained in Appendix C) also provides somestakeholder management recommendations. A classical view of stakeholder management holds thatit requires “simultaneous attention to the legitimate interests of all appropriate stakeholders, both inthe establishment of organizational structures and general policies and in case-by-case decisionmaking” (Donaldson & Preston, 1995). From a feminist perspective, however, the stakeholdermanagement process focusses less on the legitimacy of interest and centralizing authority andpower. Instead, feminists believe that stakeholder management should be “… about creating valuefor an entire network of stakeholders by working to develop effective forms of cooperation,decentralizing power and authority, and building consensus among stakeholders throughcommunication to generate strategic direction” (Wicks, Gilbert, & Freeman, 1994). Therefore, ifPATH for women intends to incorporate feminist methodologies in its stakeholder managementprocess, PATH for women should focus on ensuring that coalition members form a strong andproductive network (McGuire, 2002). PATH for women should also “care enough for the leastadvantaged stakeholders that they not be harmed; insofar as they are not harmed, privilege thosestakeholders with whom you have a close relationship” (Burton & Dunn, 1996). As a result, I recommend that PATH for women quickly conduct the above referenced needsassessment. This will ensure that PATH for women is aware of, and can attempt to meet the needsof all of its stakeholders not just those with whom the staff have previously communicated or thosewho are selected to become coalition members. PATH for women should also communicatecontinuously with its coalition members and other stakeholders. As McGuire 2002, states“…network management is based on information rather than authority.” Constant communicationwill create transparency and give stakeholders the opportunity to learn about PATH for women.Communication will also ensure that there is a strong relationship among coalition members since Page | 15
    • dialogue will foster trust, build credibility, and help clarify the coalition’s goals and expectations.To start, PATH for women should host the coalition members, and provide a clear description oftheir roles and responsibilities, and an overview of PATH for women’s objective and the ReportCard. Communications tools and an organizational strategic communications plan are included inAppendix D. PATH for women must also empower its members. PATH for women is uniquely capable ofproviding relevant and timely evidenced-based data to its community members. Furthermore,PATH for women has expertise in translating research into effective programmatic policy, andbridging the information gap between researchers, service providers, and community organizations.Empowering coalition members would require PATH for women to provide access to its resourcesand skills, and train coalition members so that they can develop the capacity to request researchwhen needed and incorporate evidenced-based research in their interventions and advocacy efforts. Additionally, PATH for women should facilitate and promote a shared understanding of theroot causes of the issues and collective approaches to producing efficient and effective policies andinterventions. A coalition, as opposed to individual actors, has a greater chance of creatingsustainable change. Lastly, PATH for women should evaluate its stakeholder engagement andmanagement processes, as well as the outcomes from this initial effort. Some suggestions on how tomeasure the outcomes of communications with stakeholders are in Appendix D. Evaluating theengagement process will allow PATH for women to improve and/or maintain the quality of both itsrelationships with its stakeholders, including coalition leaders. Page | 16
    • Objective #2: Strengthen Strategic Communication Skills PATH for women’s strategic plans include supporting two coalitions, forming an advisorycommittee, and increasing public awareness of the organization in order to gain credibility withinthe region. Extensive internal and external communication is critical to the attainment of thesegoals, but without effective strategic communication, PATH for women will not be able to recruitcoalition members, nor will PATH for women be able to increase its profile.The term strategic communication “describes the combination of plans, goals, practices, and toolswith which an organization sends consistent messages about its mission, values, andaccomplishments” (Patterson & Radtke, 2009). Therefore, PATH for women needed acomprehensive organizational strategic communications plan and numerous tools and templates toprepare the organization to pursue these goals. Unlike an event specific or announcement-specificplan, an organizational strategic communications plan formalizes PATH for women’s overall policyfor internal and external communication, provides guidance on how to communicate proactivelyand reactively with various audiences, and includes instructions on how to develop and maintainrelationships through clear communications. The process for this objective is described below andshown in Figure 2. Intentionally Blank Page | 17
    • Figure 3: Strategic Communications Plan Process Map Solicit Internal Buy-in and Communications Audit Revise and Design and Deliver Needs Assessment Improve Process Content and Tools Monitoring Communications Plan Evaluation and MonitoringAdapted from Communcation Partners. (n.d.). Strategic Communication: Communication Partners. Retrieved August 12,2012, from Communications Partners: http://www.communipartners.com/Strategic_Communication.html Page | 18
    • Solicit Internal Buy-in and Communications Audit The creation of the strategic communications plan required constant dialogue with thePATH for women staff, and initial discussions centered on the scope of the plan. PATH forwomen’s strategic initiatives (coalition building, increasing public awareness) required specificprogram planning. Nevertheless, as we assessed the current state of PATH for women’scommunication capabilities, we quickly realized that PATH for women could not move forwarduntil PATH for women had a clear brand. In other words, PATH for women lacked a clearpersonality, and the tools such as a logo, mission, vision, graphic standards, and cohesive andconsistent messaging, tone, and communication activities that were necessary to establish apersonality. Therefore, PATH for women agreed that I should focus on creating an organizationalstrategic communications plan. Nevertheless, I ensured that the communication products andtemplates from this organizational strategic plan included information that could easily beincorporated into the program specific activities for PATH for women coalition support projects. Next, I asked PATH for women to give me access to its Dropbox where all of its pastcontent such as letters to stakeholders, press releases, organizational capacity descriptions that wereused for grants etc., was housed. Upon receipt, I reviewed these materials so that I could gain abetter understanding of PATH for women, its history, its communications culture, specifically itstone and style, and its past strategies for communicating with the public and stakeholders. Thisinformation provided context and helped shape the communications goals, objectives, and activitiescontained in the organizational strategic communications plan (see Appendix D). Page | 19
    • I also requested, and received, access to the budgets and financial information for theoutreach division since resource availability determines which communication channels andstrategies are most realistic and appropriate. Lastly, I incorporated portions of the situationalanalysis that I conducted for PATH for women’s strategic plan into the communications plan. Thesituational analysis (which I discuss in detail below) identified internal and external forces thataffect the overall organization. Therefore, I expanded where necessary, to highlight the forces thatwould have the most effect on the communications plan.Creation of Communication Content, Tools, and Templates I facilitated a brainstorming session with PATH for women regarding the message thatthey would like to convey to key stakeholders. We also discussed how they would like to beperceived by the public, and encouraged them to think about terms and phrases that they believedescribe the organization and capture their vision. In addition, we brainstormed what success wouldmean to the organization. Lastly, we brainstormed the mission, vision, and values for theorganization. (These steps are similar to #3 and # 8 of the Bryson (2004) framework). To helpprepare PATH for women for this part of the meeting, I sent the PATH for women staff samples ofmissions, visions, and values, definitions of the terms we would be using, and PATH for women’sold mission statement, that I found in their paperwork. This mission statement was insufficientbecause it focused solely on the research division of the organization. These materials are includedin Appendix D. At the end of the session, we had a revised mission and drafts of the vision andvalues that PATH for women felt comfortable with me using as a basis for the next stage. Page | 20
    • I then used these drafts and the other information from the brainstorming session to createtools, templates, and guidelines. I created brand editorial standards (see Appendix D) and asdiscussed below the marketing consultant and graphic artist created graphic standards. I alsodeveloped outreach tools such as invitation letters for an advisory committee and coalitions arounddiabetes and first trimester prenatal care (see Appendix D) and other content that could easily beadapted for the PATH for women website.Project Coordination Once it became clear that PATH for women needed templates and othercommunication materials, I altered my objectives to include sourcing and managing theefforts of a graphic artist and marketing consultant. I believed that we needed professionals todesign products such as a logo, graphic standards, stationary templates, and communicationtemplates such as project worksheets. As a result, I approached a contact of mine, a formermarketing executive with extensive experience with academic institutions, and herecommended a graphic artist. Together we created a scope of work and shared it with PATHfor women. PATH for women agreed to the scope and the nominal fee of $200. The scope ofwork and the associated deliverables are included in Appendix E. The marketing consultantand graphic artist then used my notes and the materials from the above referencedbrainstorming session to create their deliverables. My analysis of PATH for women’s communications capacity also revealed that theorganization had to increase its web and social media presence. PATH for women only had a smallbyline on the CWH’s website. I contacted the person responsible for maintaining this page todetermine what if anything we could do to increase PATH for women’s presence. This individualresponded that OHSU has a very strict policy regarding website content and that it would be anextensive undertaking to change the CWH page. Consequently, I revised my tasks for this objective Page | 21
    • to include facilitating PATH for women’s transition to a website dedicated to its organization. SinceOHSU’s website creation and maintenance process seemed extremely complex, I suggested that wemove the website for the outreach division of PATH for women to the WGSS page at PSU. WGSSagreed and a link to PATH for women’s page will be housed under a new tab on the WGSShomepage dedicated to “Activism.” The research division will still have a presence on the CWHwebsite, but it will now include a link to the new PATH for women webpage, and vice versa.Organizational Strategic Communications Plan Organizational communications plans include the strategic goals that the plan will helpachieve. They also include the target audience(s) and specific outcomes that the plan can achieve;the communication channels, methods, and activities to implement the plans; an exploration of theresources necessary to implement the plan; and tools to evaluation the effectiveness of thecommunications plan (Positioning Public Child Welfare Initiative, 2012; Schwartz, 2010; W.K.Kellogg Foundation, n.d.). (In addition, this portion of the communications planning process issimilar to steps #4, #5, #6, #7, and # 9 of the Bryson (2004) framework). The goals for theorganizational strategic communications plan are outlined above. They were apparent when werealized that PATH for women lacked even the most basic communication materials andcommunications infrastructure. In addition, PATH for women’s strategic goals, which are discussedlater in this report, also shaped the overall goals for the communications plan. The stakeholderanalysis that I conducted for objective #1 and the situational analysis that I conducted for objective#3 helped me identify the target audience. Lastly, the aforementioned brainstorming session andcommunications audit provided the details for the remaining elements of the plan. Once I completeda draft of the strategic communications plan, I submitted it to the PATH for women staff forcomments and approval. Page | 22
    • Strategic Communication: Outcomes and RecommendationsOutcomes The public will be better informed and educated about PATH for women, and theorganization will increase its public profile. The plan will also improve the quality and effectivenessof PATH for women’s communications, which will then increase the organization’s profile.Increased brand awareness may also lead to increased resources, such as PSU and OHSUdepartmental support and grants which will extend both the reach of the organization and PATH forwomen’s ability to achieve its mission. Also, the plan will facilitate improved allocation ofresources. Furthermore, PATH for women now has enough materials to prepare a press kit, whichusually consists of background material, such as the history of the organization, its mission, vision,values, current collaborators, and information on past successes. PATH for women will also have awebsite that is easy to find and easy to navigate. The website, through Google Analytics will alsoprovide a way for PATH for women to measure the success of its communication activities.Recommendations PATH for women should conduct additional audience definition, segmentation, andprofiling. This exercise will help PATH for women develop messages that will more effectivelycompel its target audiences. This information will also help PATH for women identify events,activities, and communication pathways that the organization can leverage in the future. It may alsoensure that PATH for women efforts to create an advisory committee are successful. PATH forwomen should also establish a dedicated e-mail address for announcements. This dedicated e-mailaddress will also increase the legitimacy of its communication efforts.22 PATH for women has already acted on this recommendation. Its dedicated e-mail address is PATHforwomen@pdx.edu. Page | 23
    • As the organization grows, it would also be best for PATH for women to hire or select oneperson to be the point of contact for media inquiries and become the communications plan manager.This will allow Torrie Fields to dedicate her time towards direct outreach, program management,planning, and implementation. Until then it makes sense for all PATH for women staff to becomefamiliar with marketing strategies and tactics. There are numerous free or low cost sources forguidance on how to use various communication channels effectively e.g., Guerilla Marketing forNonprofits.3 Furthermore, PATH for women should hire a marketing and social media intern whowould report to Torrie. This would ensure that there is timely-follow up and in times when a swiftreaction is necessary someone is prepared and empowered to deal with the situation. PATH for women should be prepared to allocate about four hours a week, the averageamount time most say they dedicate to marketing and social media (Institute for Media, Policy andCivil Society, 2005). This will ensure that the staff can easily gather and upload content regularly toboth the website and Facebook page, and perform other communications-related duties. Old andinaccurate information will reduce the organization’s credibility, and if the organization fails toproduce timely comments or a position on current events, the organization itself becomes lessrelevant. Moreover, PATH for women should consider adopting a social media policy.3 Levinson, J. C., Adkins, F., & Forbes, C. (2010). Guerrilla marketing for nonprofits: 250 tactics to promote, recruit, motivate,and raise more money. Irvine: Entrepreneur Press. Page | 24
    • This policy should “outline clear rules around the use of social media… suggested bestpractices around privacy and confidentiality issues, and personal vs. professional or official socialmedia behavior” (Colorado Nonprofit Association, 2011). PATH for women should also develop afundraising or development communications plan. This organizational communications plan willprovide the foundation for the fundraising communications plan since “a developmentcommunications strategy starts with the organization’s overall communications plan … and must bedone in the context of how the organization has decided to present itself to the public” (Poderis,2011). The fundraising communications plan would help PATH for women achieve its strategicgoal of becoming financially sustainable. In addition, PATH for women should expand its portfolio of materials to support itscommunication activities. For example, the staff can convert the new logo and brand statement intopromotional items that the staff can leave behind and giveaway. PATH for women can then testthese new materials with its coalitions and advisory committee. PATH for women could also createan annual report. The annual report would help publicize significant achievements and eventsAnother recommendation is that each invitation to the coalition should be followed by a phone callto verify receipt of the information, answer questions, and if possible arrange an in-person meetingsince in-person meetings increase the chance of successfully gaining support and strengthensrelationships (W.K. Kellogg Foundation, n.d.). Lastly, PATH for women should update itsorganizational strategic communications plan annually and conduct quarterly evaluations of theplan. Page | 25
    • Objectives # 3 & 4: Enhance Applied Skills in Situational Analyses andDevelop Competencies in Strategic Planning As mentioned above the strategic planning team mainly utilized the framework describedby John M. Bryson (2004) in Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations and thestrategic planning worksheets from Bryson’s (2005) Creating and implementing your strategicplan: a workbook for public and nonprofit organizations to guide the strategic planning process.The process map and the worksheests can be found above, as well as in Appendices F and G.Specifically, these objectives required us to complete and/or reassess steps #2, #4 – #7, and #9 ofBryson’s (2004) framework within the context of a strategic plan. The information contained in theworksheets includes, a SWOT analysis, critical organizational issues, and the underlyingassumptions of the strategic plan development process. This information was then used toarticulate the goals outlined in this plan. Therfore, this plan is a record of the strategic planningprocess and the decisions that the strategic planning team made.Identify Organizational Mandates Step #2 was already completed during the development of the strategic communicationsplan. PATH for women does not have any legislative mandates, but its operations do reflect itsunique history as the result of a strategic partnership between OHSU and PSU. For example,WGSS’ mission is To support feminist scholarship throughout the university; foster student learning of the rich interdisciplinary knowledge within the field of womens studies; develop and implement feminist pedagogy; and support feminist inspired activism both within the university and in the community at large. We are committed to scholarship, learning, and activism that promote a critical understanding of interrelated systems of oppression with the goal of disrupting the resulting imbalances of power.As a result, PATH for women ensures that feminist methodologies inform its processes andprocedures e.g., the unique stakeholder scoring process that PATH for women requested during thestakeholder analysis process. Page | 26
    • Assess the External and Internal Environment and Strategic Issues My third objective was to enhance my applied skills in situational analysis. As a result,fulfilling the requirements of my objective allowed me to complete step #4 of Bryson’s (2004)strategic planning process. The resulting situational analysis is included in Appendix F. Theprocess for these objectives is described below and shown in Figure 3 below. Situational analysesare meant to “provide information on the strengths and weaknesses of [an] organization in relationto the opportunities and challenges it faces” (Bryson, 2004, p. 124). Therefore, as part of thisprocess, the strategic planning team met and brainstormed information for a SWOT analysis thenidentified and assessed the challenges and opportunities that both the outreach and researchdivisions of PATH for women face. I then drafted the situational analysis using the mission, vision,and values that the strategic planning team had finalized. The situational analysis informed the above organizational communications plan,stakeholder analysis, and its 2012-2015 strategic plans. After PATH for women reviewed a draft ofmy situational analysis they developed a few underlying assumptions (see Appendix G). Theseassumptions are the bridge between the external and internal assessments and the strategic plan. Ifone of these assumptions prove false or the situation changes then the strategic plan must beadjusted to reflect this change. Page | 27
    • Next, the strategic planning team used the situational analysis and the underlyingassumptions to help guide them as they developed a list of critical strategic issues or questions thatPATH for women must address to be successful within the 2012-2015 planning horizon. Bryson(2004) defines strategic issues as “fundamental policy questions or critical challenges affecting theorganization’s mandates, mission and values, product or service level and mix, clients, users orpayers, cost, financing, structure, processes, and management” (p. 42). The worksheet thatcaptured the strategic issues that PATH for women’s staff identified is in Appendix F. At times, itwas difficult to recall that our strategic planning horizon was in the short-to-medium term (3years), but after a series of e-mails and discussions, we were able to reach a consensus.Formulate Strategies to Manage the Issues, Review and Adopt a Strategic Plan, andDevelop an Implementation Process I reviewed notes and documentation from PATH for women’s 2004 strategic planningworkshop and stakeholder interviews, and shared the relevant information that I discovered withthe other members of the strategic planning team. In addition, the team reviewed the situationalanalysis, which helped outline what PATH for women does well and the environment in which itoperates; the recent stakeholder analysis; and the organization’s revised mission, and new visionand value statements. These documents provided context as the team developed the strategic plan.Due to the time constraints presented by the term of the 509 project, the strategic planning teamcreated goals, strategies, objectives, tactical activities, and assigned responsibilities for these tasksin three back-to-back meetings that were dedicated to these steps. Page | 28
    • During the second meeting the PATH for women staff determined that they did not have thecapacity, financially as well as time, to pursue its initial strategic goal of building coalitions aroundthe women’s health issues that the Report Card highlights successfully. As a result, the secondmeeting was spent revising the critical issue, goals etc., which were associated with that project.The worksheets, presentations, and templates that were used to facilitate these discussions areincluded in Appendices F and G.Outcomes and RecommendationsThe critical issues that the PATH for women strategic planning team identified are  How do we focus our search for grant funding in order to target "translation" grants and avoid applying for grants that are predominantly for direct services providers and researchers?  How do we gain a foothold in "policy forecasting" for womens health, that is, at the cutting edge of policy development and become a primary source of research data?  What can we do now to increase PATH for women’s visibility even more effectively, beyond the push we made this summer with our website, coalition letters, and advisory committee letters?  What can we do to increase our own research base beyond OSHU, the Report Card, and Healthy People 2020, as well as increase our organizational partnerships?The strategic plan addresses these critical issues and as part of its strategic plan, PATH for womenshall pursue the following strategic goals:  Increase financial sustainability  Become the premier evidenced-based health policy advisory group in Oregon  Increase and maintain brand awareness  Increase PATH for women’s ability to respond to the research needs of its stakeholders Page | 29
    • This strategic plan will be implemented over a three-year period (2012-2015) and successfulimplementation will help PATH for women take more of a leadership role in the public healthcommunity, explore additional strategic partnerships, and measure its outcomes. In addition, thisstrategic plan will provide a framework by which PATH for women can achieve its mission andwork towards its vision, while embodying its values.Conclusion Overall, this project required me to demonstrate knowledge of researching best practices,organizational development, strategic planning, systems and process creation, collaborativesolutions, economic and financial principles, marketing, community outreach, stakeholderengagement, and strategic communications. This tremendous opportunity also taught me how tomanage a complex project. As a result, I believe that I am even more prepared for a career in healthadministration. Page | 30
    • BibliographyBrugha, R., & Varvasovszky, Z. (2000). Stakeholder analysis: a review. Health Policy and Planning, 15(3), 239-246.Bryson, J. M. (2004). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations: a guide to strengthening and sustaining organizational achievement (3 ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Bryson, J. M. (2004). What to do when stakeholders matter. Public Management Review, 6(1), 21-53.Burton, B. K., & Dunn, C. P. (1996). Feminist ethics as moral grounding for stakeholder theory. Business Ethics Quarterly, 6(2), 133-147.Camillus, J. C. (2008, January 1). Strategy as a wicked problem. Harvard Business Review, 86(5), pp. 98-101.Communcation Partners. (n.d.). Strategic Communication: Communication Partners. Retrieved August 12, 2012, from Communications Partners : http://www.communipartners.com/Strategic_Communication.htmlDonaldson, T., & Preston, L. E. (1995). The stakeholder theory of the corporation: concepts, evidence, and implications. The Academy of Management Review, 20(1), 65-91 .Levinson, J. C., Adkins, F., & Forbes, C. (2010). Guerrilla marketing for nonprofits: 250 tactics to promote, recruit, motivate, and raise more money. Irvine: Entrepreneur Press.McGuire, M. (2002). Managing networks: propositions on what managers do and why they do it. Public Administration Review, 62(5), 599-609.Patterson, S. J., & Radtke, J. M. (2009). Strategic communications for nonprofit organization: seven steps to creating a successful plan (2 ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.Poderis, J. B. (2011). Fund-raising planning: developing a communications strategy for the development operation. Retrieved June 13, 2012, from Tony Poderis Raise-funds.com: http://www.raise-funds.com/2004/developing-a-communications-strategy-for-the- development-operation/Positioning Public Child Welfare Initiative. (2012). Communications: Strategy. Retrieved August 9, 2012, from Positioning Public Child Welfare Guidance: http://www.ppcwg.org/communications-strategy.htmlSchmeer, K. (1999). Policy toolkit for strengthening health sector reform. In Stakeholder analysis guidelines . Bethesda, MD: Abt Associates, Inc. Page | 31
    • Schwartz, N. E. (2010). Getting attention nonprofit marketing plan template. Retrieved June 12, 2012, from Getting Attention: http://gettingattention.org/nonprofit-marketing/nonprofit- marketing-plan-template.htmlThe Clarkson Centre for Business Ethics. (1999). Principles of stakeholder management. Retrieved August 12, 2012, from Rotman School of Business Education: http://www.rotman.utoronto.ca/ccbe/Other/Principles%20of%20Stakeholder%20Manage ment.pdfW.K. Kellogg Foundation. (n.d.). Knowledge center: template for strategic communications plan. Retrieved June 13, 2012, from W.K. Kellogg Foundation: http://www.wkkf.org/knowledge-center/resources/2006/01/Template-For-Strategic- Communications-Plan.aspxWicks, A. C., Gilbert, D. R., & Freeman, R. E. (1994). A feminist reinterpretation of the stakeholder concept. Business Ethics Quarterly, 4(4), 475-497. Page | 32
    • Appendix A Organizational Framework PATH for women Outreach Research Jamie Ross, PhDMichelle Berlin, MD, MPH Torrie Fields, MPH
    • Anticipated Action Plan (first completed on 6/20/12, last revised 7/10/12) Achieve Learning Objectives and Submit a Stakeholder Analysis; an Outreach and Communications Plan; a Situational Analysis and A Strategic Plan to PATH For Women in 10 weeks (June 18, 2012 through September 1, 2012) Action Steps Accountability Schedule Objective #1: Enhance Stakeholder Identification And Management Skills Feedback Task(s) Primary Other Start Completion MechanismPre-planning and Review 509 contract Submit action planproject management objectives and discuss project Me PATH for women 6/24/12 6/25/12 that captures expectations discussionStakeholder Submit scrubbed Ensure data integrity Me 6/25/12 7/5/12Identification data for reviewStakeholder Create prioritization and Submit template for Me 6/24/12 6/29/12Analysis categorization template review/approvalStakeholder Submit categorized Prioritize and CategorizeIdentification Me 7/2/12 7/5/12 and prioritized data Stakeholders for review 1
    • Feedback Task(s) Primary Other Start Completion Mechanism Minutes of Meeting • Finalize prior submissions to all and ifProcess Meeting Me PATH for Women 7/5/12 7/5/12 •Address any concerns necessary revised action planReport and Share report with Analyze data and makeRecommendation(s) Me 7/5/12 7/20/12 PATH for women recommendations staff Objective #2: Strengthen Stakeholder Engagement Skills Send drafts for review/approval to • Review current materialsPATH for women internal • Draft revisions and Me 6/18/12 7/31/12Overview stakeholders incorporate new material (PATH for women staff) Submit for review and approval to •Work with graphic designer toCommunication internal create templates, a logo and Me 6/25/12 7/31/12Templates stakeholders other graphics (PATH for women staff) 2
    • Feedback Task(s) Primary Other Start Completion Mechanism •Review/develop Submit for review communication procedures and approval toCommunication •Create content for website internal Me 6/25/12 7/31/12Procedures and other outlets stakeholders (PATH for women staff) Get consensus from internal and PATH for women Send finalized externalProcess Meeting(s) Me staff and external 8/1/12 8/10/12 materials to all stakeholders on stakeholders participants communication templates etc. • Outreach and communication Send report to planReport Me 8/11/12 8/18/12 PATH for women •Report staff synthesizing engagement efforts Objective #3: Enhance Applied Skills in Situational Analyses Share information with PATH forResearch Conduct literature review Me 6/18/12 6/25/12 women and receive feedback 3
    • Feedback Task(s) Primary Other Start Completion Mechanism Share information Conduct internet search for with PATH forResearch Me 6/18/12 6/25/12 analogs women and receive feedbackMission, vision Review, revise and/or Send finalizedand values develop PATH for women’s Me PATH for women 7/5/12 7/20/12 materials to all mission vision and values participants Revise/update currentSWOT and SWOT and situational Submit to PATHsituational analysis and incorporate the Me 6/29/12 7/31/12 for womenanalysis lit review, mission, vision, and values Send revisedProcess Meeting Discuss draft Me PATH for women 8/1/12 8/17/12 materials to all participants 4
    • Feedback Task(s) Primary Other Start Completion Mechanism Objective #4: Develop Competencies in Strategic Planning Create survey to determine Send survey toSolicit internal and external Me 6/25/12 7/5/12 PATH for womenStakeholder Input advocacy interests for review Survey released;Process Meeting Revise survey Me PATH for women 7/5/12 7/12/12 seek participants • Analyze and synthesizeDetermine Send report to results Me 7/12/12 7/19/12Themes PATH for women • Draft report Use the report to clarify Circulate minutesProcess Meeting program goals and Me PATH for women 7/20/12 7/27/12 and decision points objectives Incorporate prior materials Send draft plan toStrategic Plan and current data into a Me 7/28/12 8/17/12 PATH for women strategic plan 5
    • Task(s) Primary Other Start Completion Feedback MechanismObjective #5: Integrate and Apply What has been Learned, Identify Future Career Directions, and Articulate Ongoing Professional Development Needs Present strategic plan and circulate revised report to PATH for Review report and solicitProcess Meeting PATH for women 8/17/12 9/1/12 women staff and send feedback Me summary/briefing points to external stakeholders • Reflect and synthesize Submit reflective what I learned throughout paper, portfolio and processReflection Me 6/18/12 9/1/12 presentation slides to • Document progress academic advisor for towards career goals and review learning objectives •Stakeholder analysis report • Outreach and communications plan • Stakeholder Complete 509 Assuming completion of all of the objectives Engagement Report •Situational analysis • Strategic plan • Reflective paper, portfolio & presentationSource: Adapted from The Executive Guide to Operational Planning by George L. Morrisay, Patrick J. Bellow, and Betty Acomb.Copyright 1988. 6
    • Stakeholder AnalysisAssessment and Analysis of Stakeholders for PATH for women’s Coalition Empowerment and Capacity Building Program Written by: Amanda Phillips, JD, MPH Approved by: Jamie Ross, PhD and Torrie Fields, MPH August 29, 2012 1633 SW Park Avenue, Suite 221, Portland, OR 97207
    • Table of ContentsTable of Contents ................................................................................................................................................................ iIntroduction ......................................................................................................................................................................... 1Purpose of the Stakeholder Analysis ............................................................................................................................... 2Scope of the stakeholder analysis ..................................................................................................................................... 3Method(s) ............................................................................................................................................................................. 3 Identification and Information Gathering ................................................................................................................. 3 Prioritization and Analysis of the Stakeholder Table ............................................................................................... 4Results ................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Identification and Categorization ................................................................................................................................ 5 Figure 1: Stakeholder Map ................................................................................................................................... 5 Diabetes Data Analysis .................................................................................................................................................. 6 Figure 2: Frequency of Stakeholders by Size .................................................................................................... 6 Figure 3: Frequency of Stakeholder Group by Type ....................................................................................... 7 Figure 4: Distribution of Research Capacity ..................................................................................................... 7 Figure 5: Distribution of Legislative Capacity .................................................................................................. 8 First Trimester Prenatal Care Data Analysis .............................................................................................................. 9 Figure 6: Frequency of Stakeholders by Size .................................................................................................... 9 Figure 7: Frequency of Stakeholder Group by Type ....................................................................................... 9 Figure 8: Distribution of Research Capacity ................................................................................................... 10 Figure 9: Distribution of Legislative Capacity ................................................................................................ 10 Prioritization and Analysis of the Stakeholder Table ............................................................................................. 11 Table 1: Potential Diabetes Coalition Members............................................................................................. 12 Table 2: Potential First Trimester Prenatal Care Coalition Members......................................................... 13 Page | i
    • Stakeholder Management: Strategies and Recommendations ................................................................................... 14 Strategies ........................................................................................................................................................................ 14 Engagement and Management .............................................................................................................................. 14 Monitoring and Evaluation .................................................................................................................................... 15 Conclusions, Recommendations, and Implications ................................................................................................ 15Bibliography ....................................................................................................................................................................... 16Appendix A ........................................................................................................................................................................ 18 Organizational Framework ......................................................................................................................................... 18Appendix B ........................................................................................................................................................................ 19 Needs Assessment........................................................................................................................................................ 19Appendix C ....................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Literature Review: Annotated Bibliography ............................................................................................................. 22Appendix D ....................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Definitions of Stakeholder Characteristics and Instructions for Filling in Stakeholder Table ........................ 25 Stakeholder Table (Diabetes) ..................................................................................................................................... 27 Stakeholder Table (First Trimester Prenatal Care).................................................................................................. 28 Page | ii
    • IntroductionMichelle Berlin M.D., M.P.H. an Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU) physician and researcher,founded the Policy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women for women in 2004. PATH for women was aresponse to the critical need for current, evidence-based information concerning women’s health for usetoward policy implementation and it is now a strategic partnership between the OHSU Center for Women’sHealth (CWH) and Portland State University’s (PSU) Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department(WGSS). PATH for women’s revised mission is to provide accurate, high-quality community driven research,data, and analysis to inform women’s health policy and to serve as an independent source of data, analysis,and coalition capacity-building for the public, advocates, and policymakers.PATH for women has expanded from its original emphasis on creating and translating scientific research toinform women’s health policy to include coalition capacity building and community outreach. As a result,PATH for women has two divisions (see Appendix A). One focuses on research and the other focuses onoutreach. The outreach division is housed at WGSS and it aims to develop meaningful relationships withinterested community members, community organizations, public health professionals, educators, andpolicymakers regarding issues facing women in Oregon, such as Women with Diabetes and Women withFirst Trimester Prenatal Care. The outreach division draws its evidenced-based health related informationfrom the Making the Grade on Women’s Health: A National and State-by-State Report Card (ReportCard).The Report Card has been published since 2000. The 5th edition, and most current Report Card evaluates 34health status and 68 health policy indicators and assesses progress in reaching key benchmarks and policyobjectives for each state and for the nation as a whole. For example, according to the Report Card Oregon iscurrently demonstrating a failing grade in two indicators: Women with Diabetes and Women with FirstTrimester Prenatal Care.The research division is housed in CWH where Michelle is a lead author of the aforementioned Report Card(see http://hrc.nwlc.org/). The research division aims to serve as a national and regional resource for dataanalysis, including the provision of accurate and current research concerning women’s health and evidence-based analysis of key issues that specifically affect efficiency, cost, and outcomes of the health of women. Page | 1
    • Since 2004, the outreach arm of PATH for women has:  Identified key areas in womens health with policy impact and developed materials for use by community groups, local organizations, and the public to influence policy development and implementation  Interpreted the results of health studies for policymakers, the media, and the public  Analyzed and translated existing evidence-based research for the public and policymakersPurpose of the Stakeholder AnalysisTraditionally stakeholders are known as “any person, group, or organization that can place a claim on theorganization’s attention, resources, or output, or that is affected by that output” (Bryson, 2004a, p. 35).Stakeholders are important because social and economic issues are complex problems that have mutiplecauses, are hard to define, have no easy solutions, and attempts to deal with these problems may lead tounintended consequences (Camillus, 2008). These problems require multiple actors and mutiple strategies tocreate sustainable solutions (Bryson, 2004b; Camillus, 2008). Therefore, it is crucial that organizations, such asPATH for women, take into account all of its stakholders as it attempts to solve the problems highlighted bythe Report Card by building support for coalitions that are organized around these issues.A stakeholder analysis “is a process of systematically gathering and analyzing qualitative information todetermine whose interests should be taken into account when developing and/or implementing a policy orprogram” (Schmeer, 1999). In other words, stakeholder analysis is a tool that allows an organization toidentify key actors, such as decision makers and those affected by an issue, then through stakeholdermanagement identify opportunities for creative problem solving and gain support for those initiatives.Stakeholder analyses can also guide an organization’s strategic planning processes (Brugha & Varvasovszky,2000; Bryson, 2004b). Bryson (2004b) believes “…that strategic management processes that employ areasonable number of competently done stakeholder analyses are more likely to be successful – that is, meetmandates, fulfill missions, and create public value – than those that do not.” PATH for women is in the midstof creating its 2012-2015 strategic plan and its 2012-2013 organizational strategic communications plan. Theresults of this stakeholder analysis will be incorporated into its strategic plan. Page | 2
    • Scope of the stakeholder analysisBy third quarter 2013, PATH for women would like to forge strategic partnerships with coalitions that addresstwo issues: improving the health of women and their children during the first trimester, and preventing andimproving care for women with diabetes. PATH for women will align with these existing coalitions, and willsupport them by assisting with the recruitment of potential coalition members, translating research uponrequest, and training coalition members on how to use qualitative data to support their policy initiatives.PATH for women’s staff plan to identify the appropriate coalitions as part of their duties. Therefore, thisstakeholder analysis supports PATH for women’s goal by identifying and prioritizing potential coalitionmembers that PATH for women can recruit for the existing coalitions.Method(s)The goal of this stakeholder analysis was primarily to identify stakeholders, gather their contact information,and prioritize them for PATH for women’s coalition capacity building efforts. Accordingly, the steps followedincluded identification of stakeholder, information gathering, categorization of stakeholders, development ofa stakeholder table, analysis of the stakeholder table, and prioritization of stakeholders.Identification and Information GatheringThe identification and information gathering process of this stakeholder analysis relied on the knowledge ofPATH for women’s staff and secondary information. Specifically, the work group reviewed organizationalwebsites, advocacy reports, and annual summaries. There are some limitations to this method. The websitesand reports can be outdated and organizational interests may have changed, but these sources are excellentfor an initial report and this method was most appropriate for PATH for women’s strategic planning timeline.Nevertheless, to increase the efficacy of the stakeholder analysis process PATH for women must integrateadditional steps such as a needs assessment. As a result, the work group developed a questionnaire (seeAppendix B) that PATH for women will use in the future to gain primary data on stakeholder interests. PATHfor women will also use this data to revise this report and future stakeholder analyses.Lastly, PATH for women wanted a unique stakeholder scorecard that was grounded in feminist prinicples andfocused less on power rankings and resource levels, and more on relationships, stakeholder needs, and thosewho would be affected the most by the coaltion. As a result, I conducted a literature review (see Appendix C).Based on the literature review I developed a list of characteristics and created a stakeholder table. Page | 3
    • Prioritization and Analysis of the Stakeholder TableEach stakeholder was scored. The characteristics were assigned a numerical value  Yes = 1 and No = 01  High = 3, Medium = 2, and Low = 1The total number of indicators that each organization addressed through its strategic plans or currentprogramming was also added to the individual scores.The data was also analyzed in order to address the following questions:  Regional representation and balance  Legislative capacity  The number of indicators that the organization addresses  Level of reporting or focus on the issue  Community organization and nonprofit representation  Trade association representation  Research capacity  Government organization or program representation  Direct service provider involvement in the issue  Size of organization or department  Emphasis on socio-demographic issuesThe completed stakeholder tables are included in Appendix D.1 Except for the rural versus urban category where Yes = 2 and No = 0. Page | 4
    • ResultsIdentification and CategorizationA list of 68 stakeholders for the diabetes coalition and 31 stakeholders for the first trimester prenatal carecoalition (see Appendix D). Stakeholders were then categorized into five sectors. These sectors are shown inthe following figure.Figure 1: Stakeholder Map Community Organizations and Nonprofits Government Trade Programs and Associations Organizations Coalitions Hospitals and Research Direct Service Programs Providers Page | 5
    • Key findings include:  Many of the target stakeholders for both coalitions are large organizations(diabetes n = 32; prenatal care n = 18) versus small or medium  Few of the target stakeholders are trade associations (diabetes n = 1; prenatal care n = 5)  Most of the target stakeholders are community organizations (diabetes n = 41; prenatal care n = 12), closely followed by government programs and organizations (diabetes n = 12; prenatal care n = 9)  Only 3 target stakeholders are in rural areas  The target stakeholders have a high level of legislative capacity (diabetes = 94%; prenatal care = 87%)Diabetes Data AnalysisFigure 2: Frequency of Stakeholders by Size 35 32 30 25 25 20 15 Total 11 10 5 0 Large Medium Small Page | 6
    • Figure 3: Frequency of Stakeholder Group by Type 45 41 40 35 Count of Trade Association 30 Count of Government Org. or 25 Program 20 18 Count of Community Org./Nonprofit 15 Count of Hospital/Direct 12 Services Provider 10 5 1 0Figure 4: Distribution of Research Capacity Medium 27% High High 38% Low Medium Low 35% Page | 7
    • Figure 5: Distribution of Legislative Capacity 4% 2% High 94% Low Medium Intentionally Blank Page | 8
    • First Trimester Prenatal Care Data AnalysisFigure 6: Frequency of Stakeholders by Size 20 18 18 16 14 12 10 8 Total 8 6 5 4 2 0 Large Medium SmallFigure 7: Frequency of Stakeholder Group by Type 16 14 14 12 12 Count of Trade Assoication 10 Count of Government Org. or 9 Program 8 Count of Community 6 Org./Nonprofit 5 Count of Hospitals/Direct 4 Services Provider 2 0 Page | 9
    • Figure 8: Distribution of Research Capacity 19% High 52% Low Medium 29%Figure 9: Distribution of Legislative Capacity 3% 10% High Low Medium 87% Page | 10
    • Prioritization and Analysis of the Stakeholder TableThe stakeholders that were ranked in the top 15% (n=68) for the diabetes coalition and the top 30% (n=31)of the first trimester prenatal care stakeholders are outlined in Tables 1 and 2. The sample size was not largeenough for more sophisticated statistical analyses. For example, an attempt to take the top 30% ofstakeholders in each category revealed that there is only one trade association, and that all of the governmentorganizations are large organizations.Nevertheless, there are steps that PATH for women could take to ensure that its initial outreach efforts arebalanced. For instance, it would make sense for PATH for women to invite organizations that may not havebeen in the top 10 for each issue. For example, stakeholders from rural areas may be of more interest thanthose from urban areas despite their score. Intentionally Blank Page | 11
    • Table 1: Potential Diabetes Coalition Members Organization Size Category Score Oregon Public Health Division, Hospital/Direct Services Oregon Diabetes and Medium 14 Provider Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention OPHD, Health Promotion & Government Program or Medium 14 Chronic Disease Organization Prevention African American Community 13 Small Health Coalition Organization/Nonprofit Oregon Office of Hospital/Direct Services Medium 13 Minority Health Provider Douglas County Community Large 11 Health Department Organization/Nonprofit Health Promotion & Government Program or Chronic Disease Large 11 Organization Prevention Oregon March of Dimes, Community Greater Oregon Medium 11 Organization/Nonprofit Chapter Sea Mar Community Hospital/Direct Services Large 11 Health Centers Provider Government Program or Large 11 Wisewoman Program Organization Village Gardens Community 8 Medium Organization/Nonprofit Page | 12
    • Table 2: Potential First Trimester Prenatal Care Coalition Members Organization Size Category ScoreMarion Co Health Dept. Large Government Program or 14 OrganizationDouglas County Health Large Government Program or 13Department OrganizationMarch of Dimes, Medium Community 13Greater Oregon Chapter Organization/NonprofitDepartment of Human Large 12Services Womens & Government Program orReproductive Health OrganizationProgramProvidence Women and Large 12 Hospital/Direct ServicesChildrens Health and ProviderResearch CenterWasco County Health Large 12 Government Program orDepartment-Womens OrganizationHealthACOG Large Trade Association 11NARAL Medium Community 11 Organization/NonprofitOregon Office of Large Government Program or 11Minority Health OrganizationOregon Womens Large Government Program or 11Commission OrganizationPlanned Parenthood of Large 11 Communitythe Organization/NonprofitColumbia/Willamette Page | 13
    • Stakeholder Management: Strategies and RecommendationsThis stakeholder analysis is only effective if PATH for women leverages the results and creates a stakeholdermanagement process. Stakeholder management should be continual and should include regular updates to thestakeholder analysis to identify new stakeholders, changes to current stakeholders, and to incorporate newinformation that current management efforts produce.StrategiesEngagement and ManagementThe Clarkson Centre for Business Ethics (1999) outlines seven principles of stakeholder management.Organizations should  Acknowledge stakeholders and actively monitor their concerns  Listen to and openly communicate with stakeholders about their concerns, contributions, and any risks associated with their relationship to the organization  Adopt business processes and an organizational culture that align with the recommendations of, capacity, and need of their stakeholders  Recognize that stakeholders are related to each other, as well as their organizations  Work or collaborate with stakeholders to ensure that the organization’s goals and activities do no harm and if harm is unavoidable that it is minimal and the results are mitigated/compensated  Avoid activities that violate the ethical principles of its stakeholders and/or human rights  Acknowledge the potential for legal and ethical conflicts and create processes to addresses these conflicts such as reporting, incentives, and third party review.In order to meet these obligations PATH for women must conduct the above referenced needs assessmentquickly. This will ensure that PATH for women can meet the needs of all of its stakeholders, not just those withwhom the staff has previously communicated or those who are selected to become coalition members. PATHfor women should also communicate continuously with the coalitions and other stakeholders. Constantcommunication will create transparency and give stakeholders the opportunity to learn about PATH forwomen. Communication will also ensure that there is a strong relationship among PATH for women and thecoalitions that it intends to support since dialogue will foster trust, build credibility, and help clarify goals andexpectations. To start, PATH for women should conduct short presentations to each coalition; provide a cleardescription of their roles and responsibilities, and an overview of both PATH for women’s objectives and theReport Card. Page | 14
    • Monitoring and EvaluationPATH for women should engage in continual systematic and low-impact data collection. Tracking the numberof coalition invitations sent versus positive responses. In addition, evaluations at coalition meetings, brief e-mail surveys, and continual conversations with stakeholders can provide a baseline of stakeholder awarenessand understanding of PATH for women’s value to the coalitions.Conclusions, Recommendations, and ImplicationsPATH for women must also empower the members of the coalition. PATH for women is uniquely capable ofproviding relevant and timely evidenced based data to its community members. Furthermore, PATH forwomen has expertise in translating research into effective programmatic policy, and bridging the informationgap between researchers, service providers, and community organizations.Empowering coalition members would require PATH for women to provide access to its resources and skills,and train coalition members so that they can develop the capacity to request research when needed andincorporate evidenced-based research in their interventions and advocacy efforts. Additionally, PATH forwomen should facilitate and promote a shared understanding the root causes of the issues and collectiveapproaches to producing efficient and effective policies and interventions. Page | 15
    • BibliographyBrugha, R., & Varvasovszky, Z. (2000). Stakeholder analysis: a review. Health Policy and Planning, 15(3), 239- 246.Bryson, J. M. (2004). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations: a guide to strengthening and sustaining organizational achievement (3 ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Bryson, J. M. (2004). What to do when stakeholders matter. Public Management Review, 6(1), 21-53.Bryson, J. M. (2004). What to do when Stakeholders matter. Public Management Review, 6(1), 21-53.Burton, B. K., & Dunn, C. P. (1996). Feminist ethics as moral grounding for stakeholder theory. Business Ethics Quarterly, 6(2), 133-147.Camillus, J. C. (2008, January 1). Strategy as a wicked problem. Harvard Business Review, 86(5), pp. 98-101.Colorado Nonprofit Association. (2011, July). Nonprofit help desk, faqs and resources: communications. Retrieved July 23, 2012, from Colorado Nonprofit Association : http://www.coloradononprofits.org/help- desk-resources/nonprofit-help-desk/faqs-resources/communications/Communcation Partners. (n.d.). Strategic Communication: communication partners. Retrieved August 12, 2012, from Communications Partners: http://www.communipartners.com/Strategic_Communication.htmlDonaldson, T., & Preston, L. E. (1995). The stakeholder theory of the corporation: concepts, evidence, and implications. The Academy of Management Review, 20(1), 65-91 .Institute for Media, Policy and Civil Society. (2005, Winter). Plan the work: strategic commication planning for not-for-profit organizations. Handbook. Montreal, Canada: Centre for Community Organizations.McGuire, M. (2002). Managing networks: propositions on what managers do and why they do it. Public Administration Review, 62(5), 599-609.Oregon Office of Rural Health. (n.d.). Rural definitions: Oregon Office of Rural Health. Retrieved August 27, 2012, from OHSU: Oregon Office of Rural Health: http://www.ohsu.edu/xd/outreach/oregon-rural- health/data/rural-definitions/index.cfmPatterson, S. J., & Radtke, J. M. (2009). Strategic communications for nonprofit organization: seven steps to creating a successful plan (2 ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.Poderis, J. B. (2011). Fund-raising planning: developing a communications strategy for the development operation. Retrieved June 13, 2012, from Tony Poderis Raise-funds.com: http://www.raise-funds.com/2004/developing- a-communications-strategy-for-the-development-operation/ Page | 16
    • Schmeer, K. (1999). Policy toolkit for strengthening health sector reform. In Stakeholder analysis guidelines . Bethesda, MD: Abt Associates, Inc.Schwartz, N. E. (2010). Getting attention nonprofit marketing plan template. Retrieved June 12, 2012, from Getting Attention: http://gettingattention.org/nonprofit-marketing/nonprofit-marketing-plan-template.htmlThe Clarkson Centre for Business Ethics. (1999). Principles of stakeholder management. Retrieved August 12, 2012, from Rotman School of Business Education: http://www.rotman.utoronto.ca/ccbe/Other/Principles%20of%20Stakeholder%20Management.pdfW.K. Kellogg Foundation. (n.d.). Knowledge center: template for strategic communications plan. Retrieved June 13, 2012, from W.K. Kellogg Foundation: http://www.wkkf.org/knowledge- center/resources/2006/01/Template-For-Strategic-Communications-Plan.aspxWicks, A. C., Gilbert, D. R., & Freeman, R. E. (1994). A feminist reinterpretation of the stakeholder concept. Business Ethics Quarterly, 4(4), 475-497. Page | 17
    • Appendix AOrganizational Framework PATH for women Outreach Research Jamie Ross, PhD Michelle Berlin, MD, MPH Torrie Fields, MPH Page | 18
    • Appendix BNeeds AssessmentPATH for women–a research translation, data analysis, and community outreach program–requests yourengagement and opinions in order to better serve your needs. Based on your work on public health andcommunity issues generally or women’s health issues specifically you have been identified as a potentialcollaborator.PATH for women draws its evidenced based health related information from the Making the Grade onWomen’s Health: A National and State-by-State Report Card and our hope is to provide you with relevantinformation that you can easily use to support your organizations grant applications, communityinterventions, advocacy and/or legislative goals.We designed this survey to gain a broader understanding of the following: your organizations needs; itsinterests; your level of interest in becoming involved with PATH for womens work; and your views on whatare the priority areas in the continued development of PATH for womens work. We encourage you toforward the survey to colleagues who are interested in womens healthcare issues.Your feedback is important to us, so please take a moment to help introduce yourself to us, and to share withus your views about PATH for womens work plans to support your efforts to improve the quality of life forwomen in Oregon, and to strengthen the evidence and knowledge base for womens health issues.You can also learn about the Report Card at http://hrc.nwlc.org and about PATH for women atwww.pdx.edu/ws/PATHforwomen. If you have questions or concerns, please contact Torrie Fields, PATHfor women Co-Director of Outreach, at tkfields@pdx.edu or (503) 922-3270. Thank you for yourparticipation!* Required Page | 19
    • We gather and analyze research on the following status indicators. What research data would bemost beneficial for your initiatives? *Please select all that apply Womens Access to Health Care Services (Percentage Of Women Who Lack Health Insurance, Those Who Live in Communities Without Enough Primary Care Providers, and Women’s Access to Prenatal Care and Abortion Services) Addressing Wellness and Prevention (Screening, Personal Behaviors) Key Causes of Death (Key Causes of Death, Chronic Conditions, Reproductive Health, Mental Health, and Violence Against Women) Living in a Healthy Community (Overall Health, Economic Security and Education)We gather and analyze research on the following policy indicators. What research data would bemost beneficial for your initiatives? *Please select all that apply Womens Access to Health Care Services (Access to Health Insurance & Services, Methods to ExpandMedicaid Enrollment, Access to Specific Services) Wellness and Prevention (Screening Coverage Mandates, Prevention, Nutrition, Smoking) Living In a Healthy Community (Overall Health, Economic Security and Education, Anti-Discrimination, Gun Control) Demographic Data (Population Data, Household Data) Health and Socioeconomic Disparities Page | 20
    • Would you be interested in future collaboration with PATH for women in any of the followingcategories? * Be a source of evidenced based womens health research Coalition Building Identifying research questions that need to be answered Development of policy proposals by providing qualitative evidence and case studies Other:Optional: If you would like additional information about PATH for women, please provide yourcontact information below. Submit Page | 21
    • Appendix CLiterature Review: Annotated BibliographyBuchholz, R. A., & Rosenthal, S. B. (2005). Toward a contemporary conceptual framework for stakeholder theory. Journal of Business Ethics, 58, 137–148. doi:10.1007/s10551-005-1393-8According to the article, due to atomic individualism, there is no possibility of developing a true communityor society or any true relationship between stakeholders and a corporation. The authors describe atomicindividualism as the view that individuals as separate and isolated units, and society as nothing more than asum of individuals. In contrast, the authors advocate for a relational view of corporations and stakeholdersand believe that such a view would encourage enriching and nurturing relationships between the two entities.The authors suggest that feminist theory is not enough to alter the landscape. They claim that feminist theoryprovides the social context but lacks a conceptual framework. They suggest supplementing the feministtheory with philosophy of pragmatism. Unlike atomic individualism, pragmatism sees the individual asinherently social, aware of others and in possession of the ability to adjust behaviors and perspectives as partof the social process. The result would be that corporations would view stakeholders as a core part of theiridentities, shift their understanding of their relationship to one that is grounded in responsibility instead ofcontractual obligation, and view itself as part of a network or community.Burton, B.K., and Dunn, C.P. 1996. Stakeholder interests and community groups: a new view. Paper presented at the International Association for Business and Society Annual Meetings.This paper grounds stakeholder theory in feminist theory, and believes that managers who embrace this shiftin perspective will re-conceptualize their relationships with stakeholders. For example it will them to desire anin increase in the quality of their relationships with stakeholders and to create concrete relationships thatreflect a myriad of perspectives instead of relying on the abstract and ambiguous terms such as the public andcommunity.Burton, B. K., & Dunn, C. P. (1996). Feminist ethics as moral grounding for stakeholder theory. Business Ethics Quarterly, 6(2), 133-147. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/3857619In this article the authors point out that traditional stakeholder theory focuses on the relationship of thestakeholder to a firm but fails to discuss the relationships that these stakeholders have to each other.According to the article, this classical framework also fails to include a moral framework to ground how firmsdeal with stakeholders. The authors suggest that feminist theory, specifically feminist ethical principles such asthe ethics of care could fill this gap. Page | 22
    • Elms, H., Berman, S., & Wicks, A. C. (2002). Ethics and incentives: an evaluation and development of stakeholder theory in the health care industry. Business Ethics Quarterly,12(4), 413-432. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/3857993This provides a general overview of stakeholder theory. It also uses a qualitative case study to argue that thereis a critical link between ethics and strategic decision-making. The authors then suggest that ethicalframeworks should be employed at the start of the stakeholder engagement and management process, notjust during stakeholder prioritization. According to the authors, who we include and exclude is guided byincentives as well as personal beliefs.Gilbert, D. R., Jr., Wicks, A. C., & Freeman, E. R. (1994). A feminist reinterpretation of the stakeholder concept. Business Ethics Quarterly, 4(4), 475-497. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/3857345This overall aim of this article is to show the limitations of current stakeholder theory and advocate meldingthe business practices with a feminist theoretical framework. The authors argue that stakeholder theory isgrounded in masculine assumptions that limit how firms think about the role stakeholders and theinformation that stakeholders provide. The authors use the lens and language of feminist scholars to interpretand redefine key stakeholder concepts such the firm, and the identity of a stakeholder and the ideal outcomesof stakeholder management processes.McGuire, M. (2002). Managing networks: propositions on what managers do and why they do it. Public Administration Review, 62(5), 599-609. doi:10.1111/1540-6210.00240This article seeks to explain how successful managers create coalitions and gain the support they need for keyinitiatives. According to the author, managers undertake four tasks (framing, mobilization, synthesizing, andactivation) while engaging and managing stakeholders. The article describes these tasks, explains theirimportance, and then attempts to identify the environmental conditions that enhance or detract from thesefour tasks. The author ultimately suggests that communication and transparency are critical to successfullystakeholder engagement and management.Preston, L. E., & Donaldson, T. (1995). The stakeholder theory of the corporation: concepts, evidence, and implications. Academy of Management Review, 20(1), 65-91. doi:10.2307/258887The authors provide an in-depth review of stakeholder theory, evaluates the utility and accuracy of currenttheory, and suggests alternative approaches. Ultimately, the authors argue that stakeholder theory isdescriptive, instrumental, and normative. It is descriptive because it describes the corporation, it isinstrumental because it provides a framework for examining the possible relationship between the stakeholderand corporate success, and it is normative because it examines the function of the corporation and the moraland philosophical guidelines of the corporation’s operation. Page | 23
    • Rowley, T. J. (1997). Moving beyond dyadic ties: a network theory of stakeholder influences. Academy of Management Review, 22(4), 887-910. doi:10.2307/259248This article suggests that stakeholder relationships have evolved and that organizations can no longer answerto individual stakeholders but instead must manage their relationships with stakeholder networks. The authorthen describes how these networks of stakeholders can influence an organization and uses social networkanalysis to provide a theoretical base for identifying and managing multiple interdependent stakeholderdemands. Page | 24
    • Appendix DDefinitions of Stakeholder Characteristics and Instructions for Filling in StakeholderTable  Number of indicators: This is the sum of the Report Card indicators associated with this organization. The organizations have been cross-referenced with indicators that are associated with the issues of diabetes and first trimester prenatal care. Some of them are associated with multiple indicators  Rural (Yes/No): Yes – The organization or its head office is located in a geographic area 10 or more miles from a population center of 40,000 or more. 2 No – does not meet these criteria or has multiple offices and service areas so a rural/urban distinction is not possible3  Possess Legislative Capability/Intent (High/Med/Low): High – includes organizations that have an employee dedicated to lobbying or government relations or have 2012-2013 policy ideas explicitly listed on their website. Medium– includes organization that do not have a dedicated employee for lobbying or government relations but there is some overall effort or there is outdated policy ideas listed on their website. Low– includes organizations that have neither an employee nor action items nor policy ideas/initiatives that it supports  Level of Reporting/Focus e.g., grants, coalition memberships (High/ Med/ Low): High – issue explicitly mentioned as a focus on website or other publicly available material such as grant material. Medium – issue not explicitly listed as a focus but other program information shows recent support or focus for issue related initiatives. Low – issue relevant to organizations focus but nothing on website indicates that it is a current objective or that there has been recent support for the issue2Source (Oregon Office of Rural Health) Oregon Office of Rural Health. (n.d.). Rural definitions: Oregon Office of RuralHealth. Retrieved August 27, 2012, from OHSU: Oregon Office of Rural Health:http://www.ohsu.edu/xd/outreach/oregon-rural-health/data/rural-definitions/index.cfm3A list of Oregon zip codes and their Office of Rural Health urban/rural designation which were used in this ranking canbe found at http://www.ohsu.edu/xd/outreach/oregon-rural-health/data/rural-definitions/upload/List-of-OR-Zip-Codes-and-ORH-Designations.pdf Page | 25
    •  Community Organizations/Nonprofits (Yes/No): Yes – a small local nonprofit, or a national nonprofit that has a local chapter e.g., March of Dimes, or a grassroots organization located in and predominantly serves a specific region or community and does not provide clinical services. No – does not meet these criteria Trade Association (Yes/No): Yes – a private and at times nonprofit organization whose primary objective it to support a specific group of professionals e.g., the American College of Surgeons. No – does not meet these criteria Research Capacity (High/Medium/Low): High –– includes organizations that are dedicated to conducting research. Medium – these organizations are not dedicated to research but have quantitative or qualitative data to provide. Low – may not be actively gathering data or have the capacity to make the data usable Government Program or Organization (Yes/No): Yes – A government organization, department or program e.g., DHS. No – does not meet these criteria Hospital/Clinical Direct Services Provider (Yes/No): Yes – Provides clinical services even if they are not specifically related to the issue but not as part of a government program or community program. No – does not meet these criteria Size of the Organization: Reflects the number of administrative staff (including volunteers). If the organization has a large and stable volunteer force then they are listed as a large organization. For example, Wallace Medical has a small number of dedicated staff, but it also has a large number of volunteers who consistently work for the organization. Therefore, it is listed as a large organization. In addition, departments such as the Womens & Reproductive Health Program is part of a state agency is listed as a large organization because of the overall size of the organization despite the fact that the section specifically has 4 employees o Small: 0-15 employees o Medium: 15-30 employees o Large: 30+ employees Focus on Socio-demographic Issues (Yes/No): Yes – a focus on health disparities and issues of poverty, class, gender, and access. No – does not meet these criteria Page | 26
    • Stakeholder Table (Diabetes) Contact Information Stakeholder Type Health Disparity Focus Organization Agency Contact Last Agency Contact First Title Phone E-mail Assistant/Alt Contacts Name and Number Assistant/Alt Contacts E-mail Number of Rural (Yes/No) Possesess Level of Community Trade Research Capacity Government Org. Hospital/Clinical Size Department Focus on Socio- Score Name Name indicators Legislative Reporting/Focus Org./Nonprofit Association (High/Medium/Low) or Program Direct Services or Organization demographic Issues Capability/Intent e.g., grants, (Yes/No) (Yes/No) (Yes/No) Provider (Yes/No) (Large/Medium/S (Yes/No) (High/Med/Low) coalition mall) memberships (High/ Med/ Low)1,000 Friends of Oregon Sulzen Tara Outreach Coordinator 503-497-1000 ext 137 tara@friends.org 2 No Low Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 42 Roads Crossing Healthcare, PC Saeks, PhD, LAc Stephen D. Owner 503-617-0450 dr.saeks@2roadscrossing.com 2 No Low Low No No Low No Yes Small Yes 4African American Health Coalition Moore Nyla Program Coordinator 503-413-1850 nylam@aahc-portland.org 6 No High High Yes No Medium No No Small Yes 13American Cancer Society Kensok Alissa Oregon Grassroots Relationship Mgr. 503-795-3926 Alissa.Kensok@cancer.org 2 No High Low Yes No High No No Large Yes 8American Heart Association Tama-Sweet Stephanie Government Relations Director 503-595-2278 Stephanie.Tama-Sweet@heart.org 5 No High High Yes No High No No Large Yes 13Benton County Kotyo Margaret Administrative Manager 541-766-6800 Teresa Farley, 541-766-6800 teresa.farley@co.benton.or.us 1 No High High No No Medium Yes No Large Yes 8 Susan Peithman (Statewide Advocate),Bicycle Transportation Alliance Kransky Gerik Advocacy Director 503-226-0676, ext 11 gerik@btaoregon.org (503) 226-0676 x18 susan@btaoregon.org 2 No High Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 6CareOregon Taylor Martin Dir. of Public Policy & Member Centricity 503-416-4100, ext 3690 taylorm@careoregon .org 1 No High High Yes No High No No Large Yes 9Casey Eye Institute at OHSU Outreach Coordinator 503-418-1698 coughlka@ohsu.edu 1 No High High No No High No Yes Large Yes 9Center for Health and Social Inequality Research, (PSU?) Carlson Matthew Professor 503-725-9554 carlsonm@pdx.edu 3 No High Low No No High No No Large Yes 8Child Development & Rehabilitation Center, OHSU Krahn Gloria Executive Director 503-494-8364 krahng@ohsu.edu 1 No High Low No No High No Yes Large Yes 7City of Portland Office of Sustainable Development Anderson Susan Director 503-823-7222 susananderson@ci.portland.or.us 2 No High Low No No High No No Large Yes 7City Repair Van Meter Mia Office and Volunteer Coordinator 503-235-8946 info@cityrepair.org 2 No High Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 6 Cindy Becker (Dir. Of Clackmas Health Dept.),Clackamas County Health Department Franc Marti Public Health Services Manager 503-655-8479 martifra@clackamas.or.us 503-650-5696 CBecker@co.clackamas.or.us 1 Yes High High No No Medium Yes No Large Yes 10Coalition for a Livable Future Gross Mara Policy Director 503-294-2889 mara@clfuture.org 2 No High Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 6Columbia Land Trust Costello Amy Grants Manager 360-213-1213 acostello@columbialandtrust.org 2 No High Low Yes No Low No No Medium Yes 6Community Services Consortium Teem Dean Community Relations and Development Dir. 541-265-8505 dteem@communityservices.us 3 No High High Yes No Low No No Large Yes 9Department of Human Services Oregon Genetics Program Silvey Kerry Public Health Genetics Specialist 541-346-2610 ksilvey@uoregon.edu 2 No High High No No High Yes No Large Yes 10Douglas County Health Department Madison Peggy Health Department Administrator 541-440-3563 pemadison@co.douglas.or.us 2 Yes High High No No Medium Yes No Large Yes 11EarthShare Oregon Wilson Jan Executive Director 503-223-9015 jan@earthshare-oregon.org 2 No High Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 6Environmental Public Health Tracking Program Chetock Tara Public Health Educator 971-673-1496 tara.a.chetock@state.or.us 2 No High Low No No High Yes No Large Yes 8Free Clinic of SW Washington Callahan Patrick Diabetes Transitional Clinic Director 360-313-1395 patrick@freeclinics.org 2 No High High Yes No Medium No No Large Yes 9Friends of Tryon Creek Kreisman Sarah Volunteer/Outreach Coordinator 503-636-4398 sarah@tryonfriends.org 2 No Medium Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 5Geneforum Fowler Greg Executive Director 503-636-3627 gfowler@geneforum.org 2 No High Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 6Green Empowerment Gauntlett Dexter Program and Resource Development Manager 503-284-5774 dexter.gauntlett@greenempowerment.org 1 No High Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 5Groundwork Portland Cohen Cassie L. Executive Director/Program Director 503-662-2520 cassie@groundworkportland.org 2 No High Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 6Growing Gardens Bender Rodney Gardens Programs Manager 503-284-8420 ext. 101 rodney@growing-gardens.org 2 No High Medium Yes No Low No No Small Yes 7 Vicky Buelow (Diabetes Program Research Analyst), 971-673-Health Promotion & Chronic Disease Prevention Oregon Hastings Dana Drum Chronic Disease Programs Manager 971-673-0984 danna.d.hastings@state.or.us 0984 victoria.h.buelow@state.or.us 4 No High High No No High Yes No Large No 11Josiah Hill III Clinic Ueoka Kimie Program Manager 503-802-7389 kimie@jhillclinic.org 1 No High Low No No High No Yes Small Yes 7 Dr. Gregory A Nichols, Sr Investigator/CreatorKaiser Permanente Center for Health Research Whitlock Evelyn P. Director of Evidence-based Medicine 503-335-2400 Evelyn.Whitlock@kpchr.org Kaiser Permanente Northwests Diabetes Registry Greg.Nichols@kpchr.org 3 No Low High No No High No No Large Yes 8Komen Breast Cancer Foundation Brownmiller Gail Director of Community Programs 503-553-3674 gbrownmiller@komenoregon.org 1 No High Low Yes No High No No Large Yes 7 Dr. Kenneth Ward Director, Diabetes ResearchLegacy Health Systems Eskenazi Leah Senior Manager Community Programs 503-413-6778 leskenaz@lhs.org Legacy Research Institute, 503-413-5171 wkward@lhs.org 1 No High High No No High No Yes Large Yes 9 State Director of Program Services & PublicMarch of Dimes, Greater Oregon Chapter Rogovoy Joanne Affairs 971-270-2885 jrogovoy@marchofdimes.com 4 No High Medium Yes No High No No Medium Yes 11Marion Co Health Dept Antonucci Jeanne Program Supervisor 503-588-5342 jantonucci@co.marion.or.us 1 Yes High High No No Medium Yes No Large Yes 10Medicaid Health Information Technology (HIT) Project Otter Susan Project Director 503-373-2176 Susan.otter@state.or.us 2 No High Low No No Low Yes No Large No 5Multnomah County Environmental Health Services Wickham Lila Director 503-988-3400 ext. 22404 lila.a.wickham@co.multnomah.or.us 2 No High Low No No Medium Yes No Large Yes 7Multnomah County Health Dept- Chronic Liver Disease ProjectNATIONAL INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ASSOCIATION Simmons David Director of Government Affairs and Advocacy 503-222-4044 ext. 119 dsimmons@nicwa.org 2 No High Medium Yes No Medium No No Large Yes 8Native American Rehabilitation Association (NARA) Goerl Alison Program Manager, Diabetes Prevention Program 503-230-9875 ext 334 agoerl@naranorthwest.org Ruth Anne McGovern, (503) 230-9875 Ext 313 rmcgovern@naranorthwest.org 1 No High Medium No No Medium No Yes Large Yes 7NAYA Family Center Meier Julia Coalition of Communities of Color Coordinator 503-288-8177 ext. 295 juliam@nayapdx.org 2 No High Medium Yes No Medium No No Large Yes 8Northwest Health Foundation Johnson Kevin Community Partnerships 503-220-1955 kevin@nwhf.org 2 No High Medium Yes No High No No Medium Yes 9Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board Roberts Jim Policy Analyst 503-228-4185 jroberts@npaihb.org 2 No High High Yes No Medium No No Large Yes 9Nursing Mothers Council of Oregon Rice Marion Workplace Lactation Support Service Coordinator 503-708-0707 marion@nursingmotherscounsel.org 1 No High Low No No Medium No Yes Small Yes 6Oregon Department of Genetics Roemmich Bridget Program Coordinator 971-673-0271 bridget.r.roemmich@state.or.us 2 No High High No No High Yes No Large Yes 10Oregon Environmental Council Coleman Jen Outreach Director 503-222-1963 ext. 105 jenc@oeconline.org 4 No High Low Yes No Medium No No Medium Yes 9Oregon Food Bank Stubenvoll Jon Director of Advocacy 503-282-0555 ext. 3380 jstubenvoll@oregonfoodbank.org 1 No High Medium Yes No Medium No No Small Yes 7Oregon Hunger Relief Task Force Whitney-Wise Patti Executive Director 503-595-5501, Ext. 302 patti@oregonhunger.org 1 No High Medium Yes No Medium No No Small Yes 7 Director of Health Policy and GovernmentOregon Nurses Association Baessler Sarah Relations 503-293-0011 ext. 342 baessler@oregonrn.org 1 No High Medium No Yes Medium No No Large Yes 7Oregon Office of Minority Health Tillman Tricia Administrator 971-673-1285 tricia.tillman@state.or.us 5 No High High No No High Yes No Large Yes 13Oregon Public Health Division, Oregon Diabetes and Heart Disease& Stroke Prevention Anderson Jean Program Manager 971-673-0984 jean.r.anderson@state.or.u 6 No High High No No High Yes No Large Yes 14 Vicky Buelow, Diabetes Program ResearchOPHD, Health Promotion & Chronic Disease Prevention Aird Kirsten Policy Lead 971-673-1053 kirsten.g.aird@state.or.us Analyst, 971-673-0984 victoria.h.buelow@state.or.us 6 No High High No No High Yes No Large Yes 14Oregon Womens Commission Petit Sunny Chair 503-302-9725 OACO.mail@state.or.us 4 No High Low No No Medium Yes No Large Yes 9OSPIRG Titus Julie Development Director 503-231-4181 ext. 303 info@ospirg.org 3 No High Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 7Partners for a Hunger-Free Oregon Whitney-Wise Patti Executive Director 503-595-5501, Ext. 302 patti@oregonhunger.org 1 No High Medium Yes No Medium No No Small Yes 7Porltand Community Kitchens Furbush Jocelyn Volunteer & Outreach Coordinator 503-956-0672 jocelyn.furbush@gmail.com 1 No High Medium Yes No Low No No Small Yes 6Portland Fruit Tree Project Hatton Bob Program Coordinator 503-284-6106 bob@portlandfruit.org 1 No High Medium Yes No Low No No Small Yes 6Portland Plan Armstrong Tom Program Coordinator 503-823-3527 tom.armstrong@ci.portland.or.us 3 No High Low No No High No No Small Yes 8Portland Police Bureau Sunshine Division South Kristi Development & Communications Manager 503-823-2116 kristi@sunshinedivision.org 1 No High Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 5Providence Medical Group Stephens Elizabeth Medical director, Providence Diabetes Education 503-215-6600 Elizabeth.Stephens@providence.org Kathy Schwab, Program Manager (503) 215-6628 1 No High High No No High No Yes Large Yes 9Samaritan Health Services Meagher Patty Samaritan Diabetes Coalition Member 541-557-6414 pmeagher@samhealth.org 1 No High High No No High No Yes Large Yes 9Sea Mar Community Health Centers Angulo Antoinette Director, Preventive Health Services 206-764-4705 antoinetteangulo@seamarchc.org 1 Yes High High No No High No Yes Large Yes 11Tobacco Prevention and Healthy Communities Coordinator,Washington County DHHS Bennett Carla Program Coordinator 503-846-4544 Carla_Bennett@co.washington.or.us 3 No High Low No No High Yes No Large Yes 9Upstream Public Health Colon Claudia Arana Health Equity Coordinator 503-284-6390 claudia@upstreampublichealth.org 3 No High Low Yes No High No No Medium Yes 9Village Gardens Baker Amber Program Director 503-927-0820 abaker@janusyouth.org 3 No High Medium Yes No Low No No Small Yes 8 External Relations and Executive ProjectWallace Medical Concern Dill Tanja Manager 503-489-1760 tanjad@wallacemedical.org 1 No High High No No Medium No Yes Large Yes 8Willamette Pedestrian Coalition Routh Steph Executive Director 503.223.1597 info@wpcwalks.org 2 No High Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 6Wisdom of the Elders, Inc. High Bear Rose Co-founder 503-775-4014 rosehb@wisdomoftheelders.org 2 No High High Yes No Low No No Large Yes 8Wisewoman Program Dillon Wendy Program Manager 971-673-1367 wendy.j.dillon@state.or.us 5 No High High No No Low Yes No Large Yes 11Zenger Farm Hale Prairie Community Involvement Coordinator 503-282-4245 prairie@zengerfarm.org 3 No High Medium Yes No Low No No Medium Yes 8Indicators SCALEAccess to Diabetes-Related Services No equals 0No Leisure-Time Physical Activity/Exercise Yes equals 1Nutrition High equals 2Obesity Med equals 1 Mean 8.132352941Eating 5 Fruits and Vegetables a Day Low equals 1 Max 14Diabetes Min 4 Std Dev 2.265275917 Quartile 1st 6.75Gardenpartners is no longer operational Quartile 3rd 9 Page | 27
    • Stakeholder Table (First Trimester Prenatal Care) Contact Information Stakeholder Type Health Disparity Focus Organization Agency Contact Agency Contact Title Phone E-mail Assistant/Alt Contacts Name and Number Assistant/Alt Contacts E-mail Number of Rural (Yes/No) Possesess Legislative Level of Reporting/Focus e.g., Community Org./Nonprofit Trade Assoication Research Capacity Government Org. or Hospitals/Clinical Size of Organization Focus on Socio- Score Last Name First Name indicators Capability/Intent grants, colaition memberships (Yes/No) (Yes/No) (High/Medium/Low ) Program (Yes/No) Services Provider (Large/Medium/Small) demographic Issues (High/Med/Low) (High/ Med/ Low) (Yes/No) (Yes/No)ABC House Read Jennifer Community Educator 541-926-2203 educator@abchouse.org 1 No High Low Yes No Low No No Medium Yes 5ACOG Palacio, MD Peter E. Oregon Chair 541-385-8050 drpalacio@bendobgyn.net 5 No High High No Yes Low No No Large Yes 11American Association Of University Women Haus Betty Public Policy Co-Chair 503-363-7031 public.policy@aauw-oregon.org 3 No High Low Yes No Medium No No Small Yes 8Center for Improvement of Child & Family Services, Portland StateUniversity Cahn Katharine Executive Director 503-725-8122 cahnk@pdx.edu 1 No Low Low No No High No No Large Yes 4Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative (CAHMI) Smilanich-Rose Jana Program Administrator 503-494-1862 smilanic@ohsu.edu 1 No High Low No No High No No Large Yes 6Child Development & Rehabilitation Center, OHSU Krahn Gloria Executive Director 503-494-8364 krahng@ohsu.edu 1 No High Low No No High No Yes Large Yes 7Childrens Relief Nursery Ward Karen Interim Executive Director 503-595-4519
 karenw@crn4kids.org 2 No High Low Yes No Low No Yes Medium Yes 7CLACKAMAS COUNTY CHILDRENS COMMISSION, INC. Elder Sue Executive Director 503-675-4565 suee@cccchs.org 1 No High High No No Medium Yes No Large Yes 8Department of Human Services Oregon Genetics Program Silvey Kerry Public Health Genetics Specialist 541-346-2610 ksilvey@uoregon.edu 2 No High Low No No High Yes No Large Yes 8Department of Human Services Womens & Reproductive HealthProgram Nystrom Robert Section Manager 971-673-0243 robert.j.nystrom@state.or.us 5 No High Medium No No High Yes No Large Yes 12Douglas County Health Department Madison Peggy Health Department Administrator 541-440-3563 pemadison@co.douglas.or.us 4 Yes High High No No Medium Yes No Large Yes 13Early Childhood Services, Multnomah County Health DepartmentEarthShare Oregon Wilson Jan Executive Director 503-223-9015 jan@earthshare-oregon.org 2 No High Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 6Family Forward Oregon Cooke Beth Government Affairs Director 503-720-3574 cookeb@comcast.net 1 No High Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 5Geneforum Fowler Greg Executive Director 503-636-3627 gfowler@geneforum.org 2 No High Low Yes No Low No No Small Yes 6HIV Alliance Yandel Renee Program Director 541-342-5088 receptionistapp@hivalliance.org 1 No High Low Yes No High No Yes Medium Yes 8Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research Whitlock Evelyn P. Director of Evidence-based Medicine 503-335-2400 Evelyn.Whitlock@kpchr.org 5 No Low High No No High No No Large Yes 10March of Dimes, Greater Oregon Chapter Rogovoy Joanne State Director of Program Services & Public Affairs 971-270-2885 jrogovoy@marchofdimes.com 5 No High High Yes No High No No Medium Yes 13 Program Supervisor Prenatal and Prenatal CoalitionMarion Co Health Dept Antonucci Jeanne Member 503-588-5342 jantonucci@co.marion.or.us 5 Yes High High No No Medium Yes No Large Yes 14NARAL Morrill Anne Policy Coordinator 503-223-4510 anne@prochoiceoregon.org 3 No High High Yes No High No No Medium Yes 11Nursing Mothers Council of Oregon Rice Marion Workplace Lactation Support Service Coordinator 503-708-0707 marion@nursingmotherscounsel.org 2 No Medium High Yes No Low No Yes Small Yes 8NW Community Midwives Moray Susan Midwife 503-230-2831 susanmoray@comcast.net 4 No Low High No Yes Low No Yes Small Yes 9Oregon Academy of Family Physicians Gonzales Kerry Executive Director 503-528-0961 kg@oafp.org 1 No High Low No Yes Low No No Small Yes 5Oregon Department of Genetics Roemmich Bridget Program Coordinator 971-673-0271 bridget.r.roemmich@state.or.us 2 No High Low No No High Yes No Large Yes 8Oregon Environmental Council Coleman Jen Outreach Director 503-222-1963 ext. 105 jenc@oeconline.org 2 No High Low Yes No High No No Large Yes 8Oregon NOWOregon Nurses Association Baessler Sarah Director of Health Policy and Government Relations 503-293-0011 ext. 342 baessler@oregonrn.org 5 No High Low No Yes Medium No No Large Yes 10Oregon Office of Minority Health Tillman Tricia Administrator 971-673-1285 tricia.tillman@state.or.us 4 No High Medium No No High Yes No Large Yes 11Oregon Womens Commission Petit Sunny Chair 503-302-9725 OACO.mail@state.or.us 5 No High Low No No High Yes No Large Yes 11 Roey Thorpe, Executive Dir., Planned ParenthoodPlanned Parenthood of the Columbia/Willamette Advocates of Oregon, (503) 775-4931 x3274 roey.thorpe@ppcw.org 3 No High High Yes No High No No Large Yes 11Providence Women and Childrens Health and Research Center Durham Laurel Regional Director 503-216-7391 Laurel.durham@providence.org. 4 No High High No No High No Yes Large Yes 12Wasco County Health Department-Womens Health Pena Maria Community Health Worker 541-506-2620 mariap@co.wasco.or.us 3 Yes High Medium No No High Yes No Large Yes 12Washington County Department of Health & Human Services Stotz Diana Sr. Program Coordinator 503-846-4732 diana_stotz@co.washington.or.us 3 No High Medium No No Medium Yes No Large Yes 9Indicators SCALEFirst Trimester Prenatal Care No equals 0 Mean 8.903225806Family Planning Yes equals 1 Max 14Maternal Mortality High equals 2 Min 4Unintended Pregnancy Med equals 1 Std Dev 2.712377047Infant Mortality Low equals 1 Page | 28
    • Organizational Strategic Communications Plan 2012-2013Processes, means, and objectives for informing internal and external audiences Written by: Amanda Phillips Approved by: Jamie Ross, PhD and Torrie Fields, MPH August 29, 2012 1633 SW Park Avenue, Suite 221, Portland, OR 97207
    • Table of ContentsExecutive Summary ............................................................................................................................................................ 1Introduction ......................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Purpose of the Organizational Strategic Communications Plan ............................................................................ 3 Scope of the Organizational Strategic Communications Plan ................................................................................ 3 Overarching Goals ......................................................................................................................................................... 3 Communication Outcomes/Objectives ..................................................................................................................... 4Situational Analysis ............................................................................................................................................................. 4 Organizational Background .......................................................................................................................................... 4 Audience Definition ....................................................................................................................................................... 6 Internal ........................................................................................................................................................................ 6 External ....................................................................................................................................................................... 6 Communications SWOT ............................................................................................................................................... 7 Internal Landscape ......................................................................................................................................................... 8 External Landscape ........................................................................................................................................................ 8Communications Process ................................................................................................................................................. 9 Internal Communication Procedures .......................................................................................................................... 9 External Communication Procedure......................................................................................................................... 10Communication Calendars and Project Worksheets ................................................................................................... 11Communication Methods and Channels ....................................................................................................................... 11Objectives/Strategies/Activities ..................................................................................................................................... 12 Goal 1: Increase awareness about PATH for women‟s mission and its activities Outcome/Objective........ 12 Strategy ...................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Tactics ........................................................................................................................................................................ 12 Page | i
    • Benchmarks .............................................................................................................................................................. 12 Measures .................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Tools .......................................................................................................................................................................... 13 Goal 2: Develop a framework for effective communication that uses PATH for women’s limited resources wisely .............................................................................................................................................................................. 14 Outcome/Objective ................................................................................................................................................ 14 Strategies ................................................................................................................................................................... 14 Tactics ........................................................................................................................................................................ 14 Benchmarks .............................................................................................................................................................. 15 Measures .................................................................................................................................................................... 15 Tools .......................................................................................................................................................................... 16 Goal 3: Improve communication with stakeholders and the community at large in order to support PATH for women’s coalition capacity building, research translation, and dissemination efforts .................................... 17 Outcomes/Objectives ............................................................................................................................................. 17 Strategies ................................................................................................................................................................... 17 Tactics ........................................................................................................................................................................ 17 Benchmarks .............................................................................................................................................................. 18 Measures .................................................................................................................................................................... 18 Tools .......................................................................................................................................................................... 18Resources ........................................................................................................................................................................... 19 Roles and Responsibilities ........................................................................................................................................... 19 Budget ............................................................................................................................................................................ 19Evaluation .......................................................................................................................................................................... 19Conclusion ......................................................................................................................................................................... 20Bibliography ....................................................................................................................................................................... 21 Page | ii
    • Appendix A ........................................................................................................................................................................ 22 Organizational Framework: Two Divisions ............................................................................................................. 22Appendix B ........................................................................................................................................................................ 23 Communications Project Calendar Shell .................................................................................................................. 23Appendix C ........................................................................................................................................................................ 24 Communications Project Worksheet ........................................................................................................................ 24Appendix D ....................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Audience/Communication Method Matrix ............................................................................................................. 25Appendix E ........................................................................................................................................................................ 26 Mission ........................................................................................................................................................................... 26 Vision ............................................................................................................................................................................. 26 Core Values and Guiding Principles ......................................................................................................................... 27Appendix F ........................................................................................................................................................................ 28 Brand Statement and Other Messaging Examples.................................................................................................. 28 Brand Statement ....................................................................................................................................................... 28 PowerPoint Presentation ........................................................................................................................................ 29 PATH for women One Page Flyer ........................................................................................................................... 34Appendix G ....................................................................................................................................................................... 35Brand Standards Manual .................................................................................................................................................. 35 Purpose .......................................................................................................................................................................... 35 Brand Statement ........................................................................................................................................................... 35 Appearance of the Organization‟s Name ................................................................................................................. 35 The Logo ....................................................................................................................................................................... 36 Color ............................................................................................................................................................................... 36 Page | iii
    • Fonts ............................................................................................................................................................................... 37Editorial Style Guidelines ................................................................................................................................................ 37 Tone, Voice, and Style ................................................................................................................................................. 37 What We Say ................................................................................................................................................................. 38 Social Media .................................................................................................................................................................. 39 Links........................................................................................................................................................................... 39 Facebook and Twitter ............................................................................................................................................. 39 Glossary ......................................................................................................................................................................... 40 Abbreviations ........................................................................................................................................................... 40 Academic degrees .................................................................................................................................................... 40 Academic and Professional Titles ......................................................................................................................... 40 Acronyms .................................................................................................................................................................. 41 Addresses .................................................................................................................................................................. 41 African American, Asian American ...................................................................................................................... 41 Ampersand ................................................................................................................................................................ 41 Apostrophes ............................................................................................................................................................. 41 Bias-free Language................................................................................................................................................... 42 Capitalization ............................................................................................................................................................ 42 Do Not Capitalize .................................................................................................................................................... 43 Captions for photos................................................................................................................................................. 43 Cities .......................................................................................................................................................................... 44 Conferences, lecture series, symposia, etc. .......................................................................................................... 44 Contact information ................................................................................................................................................ 44 Course titles .............................................................................................................................................................. 44 Page | iv
    • Courtesy titles ........................................................................................................................................................... 44Curriculum ................................................................................................................................................................ 44Dates .......................................................................................................................................................................... 45Department, Office, Degree, and Program Names ........................................................................................... 45Disabilities ................................................................................................................................................................. 45e-mail.......................................................................................................................................................................... 45Faculty ....................................................................................................................................................................... 46Fellowships and other awards ................................................................................................................................ 46Foreign words........................................................................................................................................................... 46Freshman, freshmen ................................................................................................................................................ 46Fundraising ............................................................................................................................................................... 46Headlines ................................................................................................................................................................... 46Hispanic ..................................................................................................................................................................... 46Initials ........................................................................................................................................................................ 46International students ............................................................................................................................................. 47Internet ...................................................................................................................................................................... 47Invitations ................................................................................................................................................................. 47Lecture titles ............................................................................................................................................................. 47Lists ............................................................................................................................................................................ 47Names ........................................................................................................................................................................ 48Gender-neutral language......................................................................................................................................... 48Numbers.................................................................................................................................................................... 48Offices ....................................................................................................................................................................... 49Online ........................................................................................................................................................................ 49 Page | v
    • Parentheses ............................................................................................................................................................... 49 Periods ....................................................................................................................................................................... 49 Staff ............................................................................................................................................................................ 49 The ............................................................................................................................................................................. 49 Titles (dissertations, theses) .................................................................................................................................... 49 Titles (legal citations) ............................................................................................................................................... 50 Titles (organizations) ............................................................................................................................................... 50 Upperclass students ................................................................................................................................................. 50 Websites, the Web ................................................................................................................................................... 50 Checklists .................................................................................................................................................................. 51 Style Checklist .......................................................................................................................................................... 51 Editorial Checklist ................................................................................................................................................... 51 Instructional Content Checklist ................................................................................................................................. 52 Additional References .................................................................................................................................................. 52 Templates....................................................................................................................................................................... 53 Figure 1: Logo and Fonts................................................................................................................................... 54 Figure 2: Letterhead, Envelopes, and Business Cards .................................................................................. 55 Figure 3: Press Release Template and Fax Cover Sheet ............................................................................... 56 Figure 4: Report Template ................................................................................................................................. 57 Figure 5: Email Signature ................................................................................................................................... 58 Figure 6: Power Point Template ....................................................................................................................... 59Appendix H ....................................................................................................................................................................... 60 Outreach Tools ............................................................................................................................................................. 60 First Trimester Prenatal Care Coalition Invitation Letter ................................................................................. 60 Page | vi
    • Diabetes Coalition Invitation Letter ..................................................................................................................... 61 Advisory Committee Invitation Letter ................................................................................................................. 62Appendix I ......................................................................................................................................................................... 63 Budget Worksheet ........................................................................................................................................................ 63 Page | vii
    • Executive SummaryMichelle Berlin M.D., M.P.H. an Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU) physician and researcher,founded the Policy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women for women in 2004. PATH for women was aresponse to the critical need for current, evidence-based information concerning women‟s health for usetoward policy implementation and it is now a strategic partnership between the OHSU Center for Women‟sHealth (CWH) and Portland State University‟s (PSU) Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department(WGSS). PATH for women’s revised mission is to provide accurate, high-quality community driven research,data, and analysis to inform women‟s health policy and to serve as an independent source of data, analysis,and coalition capacity-building for the public, advocates, and policymakers.PATH for women has expanded from its original emphasis on creating and translating scientific research toinform women‟s health policy to include coalition capacity building and community outreach. As a result,PATH for women has two divisions (see Appendix A). One focuses on research and the other focuses onoutreach. The outreach division is housed at WGSS and it aims to develop meaningful relationships withinterested community members, community organizations, public health professionals, educators, andpolicymakers regarding issues facing women in Oregon, such as Women with Diabetes and Women withFirst Trimester Prenatal Care. The outreach division draws its evidenced-based health related informationfrom the Making the Grade on Women’s Health: A National and State-by-State Report Card (ReportCard).PATH for women’s transition into a multi-division organization has produced some organizational challenges.These challenges include  A shift in PATH for women’s core mission  The need for a vision that encompasses the entire organization and values that will guide the pursuit of the mission and vision  Ensuring that both divisions are financially sustainable  Limited organizational capacity  Identifying and developing the most promising product lines  Utilizing the most efficient operational model(s)  Employing innovative yet appropriate strategies and tactics to achieve its mission  Managing organizational change effectively  Gaining visibility, positioning the organization correctly, and increasing PATH for women’s relevance locally and regionally Page | 1
    • This organizational strategic communications plan addresses many of these challenges. The overall goals ofthis plan are to:  Increase awareness about PATH for women’s mission and its activities  Develop a framework for effective communication that uses PATH for women’s limited resources wisely  Improve communication with stakeholders and the community-at-large in order to support PATH for women’s coalition capacity building, research translation, and dissemination effortsThe plan also includes a communications framework that will help PATH for women increase its visibility andrelevance, accomplish its mission, and metrics by which PATH for women can measure its success. Thisprogram will be implemented over the 2012-2013 period. Page | 2
    • IntroductionPurpose of the Organizational Strategic Communications PlanPATH for women’s strategic plans include supporting two coalitions, forming an advisory committee, andincreasing public awareness of the organization in order to gain credibility within the region. Extensiveinternal and external communication is critical to the attainment of these goals, but without effective strategiccommunication, PATH for women will not be able to recruit coalition members, nor will PATH for women beable to increase its profile.The term strategic communication “describes the combination of plans, goals, practices, and tools with whichan organization sends consistent messages about its mission, values, and accomplishments” (Patterson &Radtke, 2009). Therefore, PATH for women needed a comprehensive organizational strategic communicationsplan and numerous tools and templates to prepare the organization to pursue these goals. Unlike an eventspecific or announcement-specific plan, an organizational strategic communications plan formalizes PATH forwomen’s overall policy for internal and external communication, provides guidance on how to communicateproactively and reactively with various audiences, and includes instructions on how to develop and maintainrelationships through clear communications.Scope of the Organizational Strategic Communications PlanThe 2012-2013 organizational strategic communications plan is tailored specifically to the outreach division ofPATH for women. Naturally, some elements of this plan require changes to the communications activities ofthe research division. Nevertheless, this communications plan is intended to help the outreach divisionachieve its 2012-2015 strategic goals. Unlike the strategic plan, however, this communications plan should berevised annually. Some of the tactics associated with this plan are either complete or ongoing. These tacticsare identified and the products or outcomes included in this report.Overarching Goals  Increase awareness about PATH for women’s mission and its activities  Develop a framework for effective communication that uses PATH for women’s limited resources wisely  Improve communication with stakeholders and the community at large in order to support PATH for women’s coalition capacity building, research translation, and dissemination efforts Page | 3
    • Communication Outcomes/Objectives  Create consistent and coherent messaging that is aligned with PATH for women’s mission, vision, values, and strategic goals in 2012-2013  Promote awareness of PATH for women by increasing recognition of the brand and disseminating consistent information to the public and all stakeholders in 2012-2013  Enlist participants for and sustain two coalitions and an advisory committee in 2012-2013Situational AnalysisOrganizational BackgroundMichelle Berlin M.D., M.P.H. an Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU) physician and researcher,founded the Policy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women in 2004. PATH for women was a response tothe critical need for current, evidence-based information concerning women‟s health for use toward policyimplementation and it is now a strategic partnership between the OHSU Center for Women‟s Health (CWH)and Portland State University‟s Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department (WGSS). PATH forwomen’s revised mission is to provide accurate, high-quality community driven research, data, and analysis toinform women‟s health policy and to serve as an independent source of data, analysis, and coalition capacity-building for the public, advocates, and policymakers.PATH for women has expanded from its original emphasis on creating and translating scientific research toinform women‟s health policy to include coalition capacity building and community outreach. As a result,PATH for women has two divisions (see Appendix A). One focuses on research and the other focuses onoutreach. The outreach division is housed at WGSS and it aims to develop meaningful relationships withinterested community members, community organizations, public health professionals, educators, andpolicymakers regarding issues facing women in Oregon, such as Women with Diabetes and Women withFirst Trimester Prenatal Care. The outreach division draws its evidenced-based health related informationfrom the Making the Grade on Women’s Health: A National and State-by-State Report Card (ReportCard).The Report Card has been published since 2000. The 5th edition, and most current Report Card evaluates 34health status and 68 health policy indicators and assesses progress in reaching key benchmarks and policyobjectives for each state and for the nation as a whole. Oregon is currently demonstrating a failing grade intwo indicators: Women with Diabetes and Women with First Trimester Prenatal Care. Page | 4
    • The research division is housed in CWH where Michelle is a lead author of the aforementioned Report Card(see http://hrc.nwlc.org/). The research division aims to serve as a national and regional resource for dataanalysis, including the provision of accurate and current research concerning women‟s health and evidence-based analysis of key issues that specifically affect efficiency, cost, and outcomes of the health of women.Since 2004, the outreach arm of PATH for women has:  Identified key areas in womens health with policy impact and developed materials for use by community groups, local organizations, and the public to influence policy development and implementation  Interpreted the results of health studies for policymakers, the media, and the public  Analyzed and translated existing evidence-based research for the public and policymakers Intentionally Blank Page | 5
    • Audience DefinitionCommunication requires strong reciprocal relationships. PATH for women’s overall audiences can be brokendown into the categories listed below. Each of these audiences requires targeted and tailored messaging. Manyof these audiences are also potential communicators themselves with access to potential supporters andsecondary audiences who are currently beyond PATH for women’s reach. In addition, some of these audiencemembers may belong to multiple categories. Furthermore, the coalitions that PATH for women may interactwith and support may include members from varying categories. Therefore, messages should be targeted, butthey must contain a consistent and cohesive portrayal of PATH for women’s mission, vision, values, and goals.Internal  Employees  WGSS  CWHExternal  Women‟s health advocates and advocacy groups  Coalition members  Community organizations  State and federal legislators  Government agencies  Researchers  Physicians and health care providers  Health interest media outlets e.g., Lund Report  General media Page | 6
    • Communications SWOT Strengths Weaknesses  Founders reputation  Lack clear mission, vision, and values  Relationships with key health care  Lack of funding decision-makers  Lack a cohesive brand and messages  Access to OHSU and PSUS  Limited communication infrastructure resources and goodwill  Low public profile and target audience  Access to research and social and unaware human capital  Limited marketing resources  Access to skilled and motivated  Limited staff student workers  No dedicated communications staff  Experienced, passionate, and  Disjointed efforts to develop a network dedicated staff  No media exposure and relationships  Internal support for improving communications SWOT Opportunities Threats  Untapped funding streams  Changing health care environment  OHSU-PSU strategic partnership  Lack of sustainable funding for  Media support/coverage organization and Report Card  Increased focus on evidenced based  Changing PSU budget and operations interventions model  Healthcare reform a high profile issue  Changing OHSU operations model  Election year  Changing demographics  Increased focus on health disparities  Social media  Conferences and industry events  Stronger ties with WGSS  More ties with researchers  Changing demographics Page | 7
    • Internal LandscapeThe term strategic communication “describes the combination of plans, goals, practices, and tools with whichan organization sends consistent messages about its mission, values, and accomplishments” (Patterson &Radtke, 2009). The communications audit revealed that PATH for women did not meet these criteria. Forexample, PATH for women had a mission that only addressed one aspect of the organization (the researchdivision), and had neither a vision, nor values statement. As a result, the organization lacked a brand. PATHfor women also had a limited web presence and no social media presence. Moreover, the organization did nothave the communications infrastructure necessary to correct these issues. For example, it lacked a database ofpress contacts; identity materials, such as a brand statement style guide; or strategic communications goalsand objectives.External LandscapeThere is a recognized need for more information on the extent, root causes, and possible solutions for healthdisparities women face when compared to men, as well as the disparities among women of various classes,racial/ethnic status, and geographic locations. Current and emerging federal and state policy also indicate theneed for shared accountability in improving targeted health outcomes on a local and regional level amongresearchers, policymakers, community organizations, leaders, and members. Lastly, increased budgetpressures make it imperative that organizations pool knowledge resources. PATH for women seeks to helpcommunity organizations collaborate.While the issues of evidenced-based interventions, research translation, and health disparities are at theforefront of media coverage, academic debates, and policy development efforts, PATH for women’s pastactivities have received limited exposure. Nevertheless, the current systemic focus on these issues and themedia‟s receptiveness to providing coverage demonstrates that there is an opportunity for PATH for women toachieve its communications and overall strategic goals. Page | 8
    • Communications Process 1Internal Communication ProceduresStep 1: Determine the communication event. Potential options include  Special event  Open house  Meeting with partner or legislature‟s office  New report announcement  The Report CardStep 2: Determine the target audienceStep 3: Determine the call-to-action goal/s for the target audience to completeStep 4: Determine the appropriate mediaStep 5: Gather data, quotes, interviews, facts, sources, etc.Step 6: First draft of messageStep 7: ReviewStep 8: Second draft of messageStep 9: ReviewStep 10: Final reviewStep 11: Approval or Edit and RepeatMove to External Communication Procedure1 A marketing consulting team developed the communications processes. Page | 9
    • External Communication ProcedureStep 12: Schedule on editorial calendar denoting:  Media  Frequency  Dates  Call-to-action goalsStep 13: Establish budgetStep 14: Establish responsible party for each taskStep 15: Review media options in regards to target audience, call-to-action goals, and budget  Press release  Website posting  Social network posting  Facebook  Twitter  Blog  Linked In  Telephone  In-person  Industry postings or partnerships  List serve  Supply content to newslettersStep 16: Publish messageStep 17: Measure outcome and goalsStep 18: Note modifications for next communication project Page | 10
    • Communication Calendars and Project WorksheetsThe PATH for women Co-Director of Outreach, or at a later date the Program Coordinator and intern, willmaintain an organizational editorial calendar (see Appendix B) of upcoming events that require messaging.They will conduct a quarterly review as well as add events and make changes when necessary. Each eventshall have a corresponding project worksheet (see Appendix C) which will include information about theaudience, message content, timing, delivery channels, the person responsible, expected results, and methodsto evaluate the outcomes.Communication Methods and ChannelsThere are multiple communication methods and channels. Those identified in the Audience/CommunicationMethod Matrix (see Appendix D) were chosen because of their ability to reach multiple audiences andbecause PATH for women has the organizational capacity to use these channels. Intentionally Blank Page | 11
    • Objectives/Strategies/ActivitiesGoal 1: Increase awareness about PATH for women’s mission and its activitiesOutcome/Objective  PATH for women delivers consistent and coherent messaging that is aligned with PATH for women’s mission, vision, values, and strategic goals in 2012-2013Strategy  Create a brandTactics  Make a logo (complete)  Formalize the organizational framework (complete, see Appendix A)  Create/revise the mission, vision, and values (complete, see Appendix E)  Create a brand statement (complete, see Appendix F)  Draft language that can be used in a variety of settings and formats that describe the history of the organization, past successes, and future goals (ongoing, see Appendix F)  Formulate a brand standards and editorial style guidelines (complete, see appendix G)2  Create a PowerPoint presentation to describe the organization (complete, see Appendix F)Benchmarks  Completed tasks  Acceptance by key stakeholdersMeasures  Number of stakeholders who understand, approve of, and can easily describe the organization‟s mission, vision, and values  Effectiveness of the PowerPoint and the other materials2 See internal document entitled Brand and Editorial Style Guidelines Page | 12
    • Tools  Focus groups  Surveys  Question and answer sessions with audiences after using the presentation Intentionally Blank Page | 13
    • Goal 2: Develop a framework for effective communication that uses PATH forwomen’s limited resources wiselyOutcome/Objective  Increased recognition of the brand, efficient use of resources, and the dissemination of consistent information to stakeholders and the public in 2012-2013Strategies  Create communications infrastructure  Develop relationships with editors, journalists, and radio producers  Create academic legitimacyTactics  Generate a press list3 (Intern)  Create tools to track communications efforts (complete, see Appendices B and C)  Identify communications channels (complete, see Appendix D) and opportunities to utilize these channels  Create various templates and tools for use in stakeholder engagement and media outreach e.g., envelopes, letterhead, business cards, brochures, coalition invitation letters, and place appropriate outreach materials on the website (ongoing, see Appendices G and H)  Create a press kit and send materials to editors, journalists, and radio producers (Torrie/Intern)  Develop and maintain website, including all online press materials (Torrie/Intern)  Monitor industry through RSS feeds etc., and write timely Op-Ed articles (Torrie/Intern)  Prepare white papers, fact sheets, and policy briefings for current issues (Michelle/Jamie/Torrie)  Distribute them to legislators and the media and place them in an online archive that is accessible through the website (Torrie/Intern)3 For a guide on creating an effective press list, see Colorado Nonprofit Association. (2011, July). Nonprofit help desk, faqs and resources:communications toolkit Parts 1, 2, and 3 (pp. 41-42). Retrieved July 23, 2012, from Colorado Nonprofit Association:http://www.coloradononprofits.org/help-desk-resources/nonprofit-help-desk/faqs-resources/communications/ Page | 14
    •  Create and consistently maintain social media presence by joining Facebook (Torrie/Intern)  Attempt to publish articles in peer reviewed journals(Michelle/Jamie/Torrie)  Speak at conferences (Michelle/Jamie/Torrie)  Create and utilize a listserv (Torrie/Intern)Benchmarks  80% e-mail and attachment open and click through rates  Website created and 1000 visits to website  5 Op-Ed pitches  1 staff profile or favorable story  20 press kits released  2 articles submitted for review  1 conference presentation  Fact sheets/policy briefings/white papers sent to 10 key decision makers  100 Facebook likes and 500 visits to Facebook pageMeasures  Number of communication tools created  Complete press list and the number of press kits sent versus number of new relationships  Website traffic  Number of redirects from the research division‟s website  Unique page views, time on page and total pages viewed. According social media experts, “if unique page views go up, that‟s an indication that your reach is growing, increased time on page shows that your content is interesting to the visitor and increased total page views means your visitor wants to learn more by clicking on other pages around your site” (Miller, 2012)  Traffic to online archive section of the website  Number of quotes and shares this material generates Page | 15
    •  Number of Facebook likes, amount of page traffic, and re-posting of page content  Number of media mentions  Accuracy of the coverage  Positive versus negative  Number of Op-Ed articles and other media pitches sent versus placed  Number of talks at conferences  Traffic to online archive section of the website o Number of times that this material is quoted or shared  Number of e-mails sent via the listserv are read and attachments that are opened when applicable versus those that are notTools  Google Alerts  Google Analytics  Facebook Insights  Internal Records  Social Mentions Alerts  Sprout Social  Sentiment Dashboard4  Right Inbox  Who Read Me (for attachments)  Google Labs e.g., Read Receipt4See Ahn, T. (2011, May 11). How to build a free social media monitoring dashboard: social media examiner. Retrieved August 14, 2012, fromSocial Media Examiner: http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-build-a-free-social-media-monitoring-dashboard/ Page | 16
    • Goal 3: Improve communication with stakeholders and the community at large inorder to support PATH for women’s coalition capacity building, research translation,and dissemination effortsOutcomes/Objectives  A roster of coalitions interested in collaborating (2012)  Advisory committee established (2012-2013)  Support two coalitions and an advisory committee 2012-2013  Improve strategic relationships with key community members (2012-2013)Strategies  Conduct direct outreach to existing coalitions  Engage and encourage coalition and advisory committee participation and support  Identify which indicators stakeholders are most interested in learning about  Communicate consistently with all stakeholdersTactics  Identify existing coalitions on diabetes and first trimester prenatal care and establish a collaborative relationship (Torrie/Jamie)  Identify potential members for the coalitions and perform a stakeholder analysis (complete)  Identify potential advisory committee members (Michelle/Jamie/Torrie)  Conduct a needs assessment (Torrie)  Briefings with legislative aides (Michelle/Jamie/Torrie)  Maintain and develop relationships with advocacy groups (Michelle/Jamie/Torrie)  Prepare and disseminate fact sheets and other materials focused on the indicators that were highlighted in the needs assessment and by the meetings (Intern)  Create and distribute a newsletter (electronic) featuring accomplishments, activities, etc. (Intern)  Produce and circulate an annual report (Intern) Page | 17
    • Benchmarks  Strategic partnerships with at least 1 diabetes coalition and 1 first trimester prenatal care coalition  Invitation to join these aforementioned coalitions sent to the priority stakeholders identified in PATH for women’s stakeholder analysis report  10 advisory committee members  60% response rate for needs assessment  10 briefings with legislative aides and 2 new relationships with advocacy groups  90% coalition leader and advisory committee member satisfaction rate  80% e-mail and attachment open and click-through rates for newsletter and annual reportMeasures  Number of new e-mail addresses and other contact information received from stakeholders and interested parties  Open and click-through rates per message  Number of advisory committee members invited versus those who accepted  Number of new coalition members who mentioned PATH for women during initial contact with the coalition. (This metric requires that the PATH for women partners with coalitions that have or are willing to implement evaluation tools and process. For example, this information can be gleaned from a survey question that asks new members where they heard about the coalition  Number of coalition and advisory committee members who feel valued and effective  Number of meetings with advocacy groups and legislative aides versus invitations sent  Response rate for needs assessment surveyTools  Internal records  Google form analysis  Right Inbox  Survey  Interviews  Google labs Page | 18
    • ResourcesRoles and ResponsibilitiesMichelle Berlin, MD, MPH (Founder and Director Research) – will act as spokesperson for all research-related matters and a liaison to CWH and OHSU.Jamie Ross, PhD (Co-Director Outreach) – will act as the lead for all academic matters and as a liaison toWGSS and PSU.Torrie Fields, MPH (Co-Director Outreach) – will act as media strategist, liaison, and communicationscoordinator. She has ties to many of the nonprofits in the region, to the Oregon Master of Public Healthprogram, and experience working with advocacy groups and legislators.To be identified (Interns) – will act as project coordinators and oversee logistics and research for identifyingstakeholders and potential supporters, and opportunities to promote the organization.BudgetAccording to Patterson and Radtke (2009), most successful nonprofits spend between 8% and 12% of theiroperational budget on communications. They also recommend that nonprofits focus their resources onchannels and tactics that can reach multiple audiences and do not require substantial staff effort (Patterson &Radtke, 2009). The proposed budget for this communications plan is included in Appendix I. The largestexpense is hosting the coalition and advisory committee members and the second largest is branding. PATHfor women is seeking funding and its staff donates much of its time. Therefore, it is likely that PATH for womenwill be able to fund these activities. Nevertheless, if PATH for women has to choose between these twocategories, the organization should reduce the budget for hosting and elect not to provide refreshments at itscoalition and advisory committee meetings. This would make the communications plan even more affordable;while providing the materials that are needed to meet the overarching goals described above.EvaluationWe will determine the effectiveness of our communications by measuring if the communications reach thedesired audiences, if the right message was sent, if the audience understood the message as it was intended, ifthe tactic used resources efficiently, and if there were any unintended consequences.Each of the objectives outlined above includes a list of benchmarks, measurements, and tools that can beused to evaluate the tactics and strategies associated with that objective. PATH for women should do an annualplan evaluation, but the organization should conduct quarterly assessments and make adjustments asnecessary. Page | 19
    • ConclusionSuccess would help advance PATH for women’s mission, attract new stakeholders, and may lead to privatesources of funding. Effective communication is required to solicit coalition members, to help onboardcoalition members, to facilitate the creation of clear goals and objectives, and to manage PATH for women’srelationship to the coalitions and expanding research. Page | 20
    • BibliographyAhn, T. (2011, May 11). How to build a free social media monitoring dashboard: social media examiner. Retrieved August 14, 2012, from Social Media Examiner: http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-build-a-free- social-media-monitoring-dashboard/Colorado Nonprofit Association. (2011, July). Nonprofit help desk, faqs and resources: communications toolkit Parts 1, 2, and 3. Retrieved July 23, 2012, from Colorado Nonprofit Association: http://www.coloradononprofits.org/help-desk-resources/nonprofit-help-desk/faqs- resources/communications/Curtis, C. (n.d.). Voice and tone guidelines: editorial strategy. Retrieved July 30, 2012, from http://www.cullencurtiss.com/images/Voice_and_Tone_Guidelines.pdfGraphic Standards Manual and Editorial Style Guide. (2011). Glenville State College. Retrieved from http://www.glenville.edu/docs/GSC%20Graphics%20Manual%20and%20Style%20Guide.pdf, andGraphic and editorial standards and guidelines. (2012). North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. Retrieved from http://www.ncat.edu/divisions/advancement/university-relations/pdfs- images/ncat-StyleGuide-7.pdfMiller, J. (2012, May 28). 5 simple metrics to track your social media efforts: social media examiner. Retrieved August 14, 212, from Social Media Examiner: http://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/metrics-to-track-your- social-media-efforts/Patterson, S. J., & Radtke, J. M. (2009). Strategic communications for nonprofit organization: seven steps to creating a successful plan (2 ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.Spitfire Strategies. (n.d.). The Spitfire Strategies Smart chart 3.0: an even more effective tool to help nonprofits make smart communications choices. Retrieved August 16, 2012, from Smart Chart: http://www.smartchart.org/content/smart_chart_3_0.pdfU.S. Army Security Assistance Command: Command Information Office. (n.d.). Strategic communication plan. Retrieved August 9, 2012, from U.S. Army Security Assistance Command: http://www.army.mil/info/organization/usasac/ Page | 21
    • Appendix AOrganizational Framework: Two Divisions PATH for women Outreach Research Jamie Ross, PhD Michelle Berlin, MD, MPH Torrie Fields, MPH Page | 22
    • Appendix BCommunications Project Calendar Shell Instructions: Start at the bottom of this sheet by filling in the communication event information and work backwards. Using the Month/Week of column on the left can allow you to track out all of the communication events for the next year. Month / Week of: Task Message Date Notes Initial meeting N/A 8-weeks out Steps 1-5 Internal process begins Being formed 7-weeks out Steps 6-9 Final review and approval Finalized 6-weeks out Steps 10-11 This space can be used to adjust for urgency, formality, frequency, etc. of the communication event. Preparing to alert media and partners about the Annual Report Card will take more time than posting the reward of a new grant on your Facebook page. Communication event Finalized message 0-weeks out Page | 23
    • Appendix CCommunications Project Worksheet INFORMATION Name of communication project: (PATH for women 2013 Report Card) Target audience: (General media, womens health-media, Oregon legislatures) Call-to-action and goal/s (Read the report) What will be the measurement of the goal/s: (Increase # of web-page views hosting the report by 2%) Budget to communicate: ($0 because work will all be completed in-house) Publish date: (Report needs to be posted on website by Feb. 2, 2014) Date started: (Todays date) Media appropriate for Soci a l Medi a Pers ona l Sha ri ng wi th Pa rnters Pres s Web Fa cebook Twi tter Indus try News l ette communication project: rel ea s e pos ti ng pos ti ng pos ti ng Bl og Li nkedIn Tel ephone In-pers on pos ti ng Li s ts erve r Is there a contact person for this communication project? Yes/No: (Yes) If yes, how and when do they need the message? (Jane Reporter at the Oregonian, 503-555-5555, janedoe@oregonian.com) ACTION Ta s k Repons i bl e Pa rty Compl eted On (Step 6) (Write first draft of message) (You) (Gather a list of email address of appropriate audience members) (Me) " " " " " (Reflect on what worked and what didnt work) (All of us) Page | 24
    • Appendix D Audience/Communication Method Matrix Communications Methods Internal CWS WGGS Internal Staff External Public Coalition Members Legislators Govt Agencies Trade Assoc. Nonprofits Hospitals Academic Researchers InstitutionsAnnual Report X X X X X X X X X X XNewsletters X X X X X X X X X XFact Sheets, Brochures, etc. X X X X X X X X X X X XProfessional Articles X X X X XPhone Calls X X X X X XWeb 2.0Webinars X X X X X X X X X X XSocial Media XWebsite X X X X X X X X X X X XE-mail X X X X X X X X X X XVideos (YouTube) XIn-PersonAnnual Meetings X X X XIndustry Conferences X X X X X XBriefings X X X X X XSpeaking Engagements/Testimony X X X XPresentations X X X X X X X X X X X XTown Halls X X X XMediaMedia Interviews X X X X X X X X XPress release X X X X X X X X XMedia advisory X X X X X X X X XPress conference X X X X X X X X XVideo Stories X X X X X X X X XBylines and Op Ed X X X X X X X X XPitch Letter X X X X X X X X XAdapted from: U.S. Army Security Assistance Command: Command Information Office. (n.d.). Strategic communication plan. Retrieved August 9, 2012, from U.S. Army Security Assistance Command:http://www.army.mil/info/organization/usasac/ Page | 25
    • Appendix EMissionPolicy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women’s mission is to provide accurate, high-quality communitydriven research, data, and analysis to inform women‟s health policy and to serve as an independent source ofdata, analysis, and coalition capacity building for the public, advocates, and policymakers.Our research and coalition capacity building efforts help others understand how Oregon, other states, and thenation as a whole are progressing in womens health, help others to develop policies to advocate for women‟shealth, and ensures that PATH for women is responsive to the community‟s health, research, and informationneeds. With the nation lagging far behind critical benchmarks (standards) in health, the need for effectivepolicies and programs is increasing; we are dedicated to bridging the information gap between the academicresearcher, policymaker, service provider, and community member, and empowering communities to requestresearch and develop programs that improve women‟s lives.VisionPATH for women is a strategic partnership OHSU‟s Center for Women‟s Health (CWH) and the Women,Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department at Portland State University. PATH for women seeks to become thepremier evidence-based womens health policy resource in Oregon and nationally by drawing from the mostrecent publication of CWH‟s Making the Grade on Women’s Health: A National and State-by-StateReport Card and enabling the development of national and regional health policies, especially those targetedto improve performance in meeting national goals for womens health.To fulfill its vision PATH for women will:  Fully address the ongoing need for current, relevant, evidence-based health information by fostering problem-based scientific research at the undergraduate and graduate levels that is directly informed by the needs of the community, and is guided by an interdisciplinary approach that includes feminist models of scientific inquiry.  Translate and disseminate this evidenced-based research to direct service organizations, as well as state and national legislators, contributing to their policy advocacy efforts.  Become a critical link between Oregon‟s coordinated health coalitions, as well as among coalition members comprised of the community at large; students; health policy advocates; health professionals; local, regional, and national direct service organizations; legislators; and researchers. Page | 26
    • Core Values and Guiding PrinciplesCommunication – We recognize the importance of an informed public and the need for accurate, highquality, community-driven research and data for policy advocacy. We are open, truthful, and timely with ourdissemination of information and by listening and responding to the needs of our coalition members andpolicymakers, we ensure that we provide relevant information.Honesty –We aim to empower communities by providing accurate and truthful information about issues thatdisproportionately affect the health of women.Collaboration – We engage community members by forming meaningful relationships and coalitions to raiseawareness about issues that disproportionately affect the health of women.Empowerment – We seek to empower coalition members to request research that will improve the lives ofwomen within their communities, and researchers to embrace new methods of scientific inquiry.Respect – We respect the dignity of all persons and honor the diverse contributions that stem from differingperspectives, cultures, backgrounds, and educational levels.Integrity – We foster, encourage, and expect the highest level of professionalism, ethical standards,transparency, and accountability in all that we do.Diversity – We aspire to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities by providing research data that is relevantto racially, ethnically, socio-economically, and sexually diverse women, and are committed to attracting andretaining coalition members who reflect these communities. Page | 27
    • Appendix FBrand Statement and Other Messaging ExamplesBrand StatementPATH for women leads the way in the translation of research and the tracking of policy that addresses themajor health disparities facing the women of Oregon and beyond using evidence provided by the 2010Making the Grade on Women‟s Health: A National and State-by-State Report Card (OHSU-Center forWomen‟s Health), http://hrc.nwlc.org.PATH for women delivers clear, nonpartisan analysis on women‟s health; interpreting materials and studies tocommunity organizations, policymakers, the media, and the public; and provides timely technical assistanceon key issues.PATH for women’s direction stems from the combined passionate research and projects of the Oregon Health& Science University‟s Center for Women‟s Health and Portland State University‟s Women, Gender andSexuality Studies Department. Intentionally Blank Page | 28
    • PowerPoint Presentation Page | 29
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    • PATH for women One Page Flyer Page | 34
    • Appendix G (Brand standards and various templates by consulting team; Editorial Style Guidelines by Amanda Phillips)Brand Standards ManualPurposeStandards manuals set the regulation and procedures for consistently and accurately communicating on behalfof an organization.A professionally developed and executed brand allows an organization to build recognition with it targetmarkets and preemptively establish credibility.The standards manual should be shared and understood by all individuals of the organization, as well as withexternal vendors, partners, and media.Brand StatementPATH for women leads the way in the translation of research and the tracking of policy that addresses themajor health disparities facing the women of Oregon and beyond using evidence provided by the 2010Making the Grade on Women‟s Health: A National and State-by-State Report Card (OHSU-Center forWomen‟s Health), http://hrc.nwlc.org.PATH for women delivers clear, nonpartisan analysis on women‟s health; interpreting materials and studies tocommunity organizations, policymakers, the media and the public; and provides timely technical assistance onkey issues.PATH for women’s direction stems from the combined passionate research and projects of the Oregon Health& Science University‟s Center for Women‟s Health and Portland State University‟s Women, Gender andSexuality Studies Department.Appearance of the Organization’s NameIn written content:The first appearance of PATH should be spelled out with the acronym appearing in parenthesis after thisoccurrence. After the first occurrence, the acronym can be utilized in the copy. Page | 35
    • In graphics:In graphic communication, the logo should be the main and first use. Where appropriate the graphictreatment of the expansion should appear in the appropriate position as recommended in this standardsmanual.The PATH name, in either form, should always precede references to OHSU, OHSU‟s Center for Women‟sHealth, or Portland State University, in order to build a stronger brand for the organization before theaudience understands the strategic partnerships.As with PATH, the first occurrences of OHSU and PSU should be spelled out and from then on, theirrespective acronyms can be used in the communication.Center for Women‟s HealthThe official name is OHSU Center for Women’s Health. On first reference, it should be spelled out withno abbreviations. On second reference, after use of the complete name, use CWSWomen, Gender, and Sexuality Studies DepartmentThe official name is Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department at Portland State University.On first reference, it should be spelled out with no abbreviations. On second reference, after the use of thecomplete name, use WGSS at PSU.The LogoThis is the logo of PATH for womenColorThe full color logo uses PMS 2925, PMS 285, and PMS 286. The CMYK, RGB, and HEX equivalents areincluded in Figure 1.Ideally, the full-color logo should be used at all times. However when necessary or more appropriate, the logocan appear in black for when it needs to appear in one-color. The logo can also appear in white if it will beplaced on black or solid-colored backgrounds that would cause the full-color logo to clash. Page | 36
    • FontsFor daily use (email, Word document, fax cover sheet, etc.)  Garamond, 10 or 11 with single spaceFor graphics, use (Adobe InDesign, advertisement, promotional banner, etc.)  GOTHAM Book, 9 or 10, 1.25 spacing  Adobe Garamond Pro, 10, regular kerning and spacingEditorial Style GuidelinesPATH for women has a unique mission and the more consistent the organization is in its tone, voice, andcommunication style the more identifiable its brand will be, and the more likely that future coalition memberswill retain and recall who PATH for women is and what we do. A strong brand will not only increase visibility,it will increase legitimacy and will ensure that we are more effective.Therefore, for consistency, all PATH for women communications, both web and written, must use the APStylebook and the Merriam-Webster Dictionary as the respective style guide and reference for specific words.Below are tone, voice, and style guidelines, as well as editorial standards. They contain general informationabout how to use social media, clarifications of the uses of terms, titles, formats, and punctuation and somechecklists.Tone, Voice, and StyleMaking the Grade on Women‟s Health: A National and State-by-State Report CardThe official name is Making the Grade on Women’s Health: A National and State-by-State ReportCard. On first reference, we should spell it out with no abbreviations. On second reference, after we use thecomplete name, use the Report Card Page | 37
    • What We SayAll communications should be in an active voice and reference PATH for women as we or us.Words and phrases that best describe what we value as an organization and set the appropriate tone in ourcommunications include Source ofCommunity evidenced- Capacity- Supportive Coalition Accuracyengagement based building information Citizen- Research CulturallyPeople Outreach Encouraging science translation sensitive Service-Transparency Collaboration Assisting Beneficial Communication oriented PromotesAccess: to dignity andresearch and Connection Grassroots Idealistic Diversity strengthensto care women‟s voicesCritical Experiential Integral Inclusive Supportive Useful Inspired andKnowledge Responsive Energetic Progressive Relevant InspiringAwareness Dedicated Accessible Engaged Scientific rigor Consistent Page | 38
    • To clarify further the voice and tone we seek we can use this tool to help evaluate our choicesPATH for women is PATH for women is notInclusive Members-onlyProgressive Rooted in historical perspectivesResponsive PrescriptivePopulations and communities oriented Focused on individual solutionsSupportive of advocacy An advocateSocial MediaLinksURLs should be short. This ensures that the URL is easy-to-remember and that it will draw people to ourwebsite. We can use services such as bitly.com to help create short customized URLs whenever possible. Inaddition, always be sure to use the same link in every post. This will ensure that people start to remember ourwebsite.Facebook and TwitterFacebook has expanded its character limit, but we should aim to keep our posts within the original 420-character maximum. This ensures that people who scan their newsfeeds or view their Facebook pages ontheir phone will still be able to quickly determine our message and call-to-action.  PATH for women has provided health status information to guide the development of House Bill xxx, which will ensure that all mothers will receive first trimester prenatal care. For more information on our efforts go to www.pdx.edu/ws/activism/PATHforwomen or contact Torrie Fields at 503-666- 8888.  Do the mothers and families you serve rely on the TANIF program? Do you have qualitative data and case studies about the difference this program makes in the lives of Oregonians? If so, join a coalition focused on bridging-the-gap between researchers, policy makers, community organizations, and health service providers. If you are interested, contact Torrie Fields at 503-666-8888. Page | 39
    • Twitter posts are still restricted to 140 characters except for those with expanded tweet capabilities. One wayto ensure that we have consistent messaging across all social media platforms is to shorten the originalFacebook post instead of creating entirely new messaging  PATH for women’s research helps develop House Bill xxx, ensuring that Oregon mothers receive first trimester prenatal care. More info @ www.pdx.edu/ws/activism/PATHforwomenGlossary5AbbreviationsRefer to the Associated Press Stylebook for specific uses.Academic degrees  If possible, refer to academic degrees in a phrase rather than with an abbreviation: The lecture featured David L. King, who holds a bachelor‟s degree in English literature, a master‟s degree in psychology, and a doctorate in neurobiology  Use apostrophes in bachelor‟s degree, master‟s degree, etc.  Do not capitalize bachelor of science, master of arts, etc. Likewise, do not capitalize the field (bachelor of arts in philosophy) unless it is a proper noun (bachelor of arts in English)  Use abbreviations only in cases where applying the above rule would make whatever the sentence cumbersome or confusing  If possible, do not use courtesy titles (Dr. David L. Yow) to indicate academic degreesAcademic and Professional Titles  Capitalize academic or professional titles in sentences only if they precede the person‟s name. When the names and titles stand alone, such as in a table, you can capitalize the titles: Associate Professor of English Wayne de Rosset also served as announcer  Sherry Jones, professor of business education, is also chair of the Department of Business5Adapted from Graphic Standards Manual and Editorial Style Guide. (2011). Glenville State College. Retrieved fromhttp://www.glenville.edu/docs/GSC%20Graphics%20Manual%20and%20Style%20Guide.pdf, and Graphic and editorial standardsand guidelines. (2012). North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. Retrieved fromhttp://www.ncat.edu/divisions/advancement/university-relations/pdfs-images/ncat-StyleGuide-7.pdf Page | 40
    • Acronyms  Acceptable on second and subsequent references if given in parentheses after a first spelled-out use: The Student Government Association (SGA) held its first meeting today. The next SGA meeting will take place in two weeks  Acceptable without first spelling out if initials are widely recognized (e.g., CEO, SAT, NCAA, AIDS, HMO, NASA, FBI)  Do not put in parentheses after a first spelled-out use if we do not mention the organization againAddresses  Use abbreviations only in numbered addresses: She works at 200 High St.  Otherwise, spell out directional modifiers and road designations: He lives on North Charles StreetAfrican American, Asian American  Do not hyphenateAmpersand  Do not use an ampersand (&) in place of “and” in running text, even in the names of units or organizations that use an ampersand. Use the ampersand only in titles of published works, corporate names, course abbreviations, and graphic treatmentsApostrophes  Do not use to form plurals (1950s, not 1950‟s) except in the cases of single letters (straight A‟s)  The apostrophe replaces missing letters (e.g., doesn‟t) and missing numbers (e.g., class of ‟71)  The curved (or “smart”) version is preferred unless it is representing feet in a measurement: 6‟ 8”  If use of straight apostrophes is the convention for a Web site, consistency is key Page | 41
    • Bias-free Language  Where possible, use first-year students instead of freshmen  International students are preferred over foreign students  Juniors and seniors is preferred over upperclass students  See also gender-neutral languageCapitalization  Capitalize all proper nouns and proper names  As a rule, official names are capitalized (Department of Business, Office of Admissions) and unofficial names are not (business department, admissions office)  Capitalize geographical areas and localities (the Eastern Shore, New York City), government bodies (the U.S. Congress), historical periods (the Depression, the Enlightenment), names referring to a specific deity (God, Allah), sacred books (the Bible, the Koran), religions (Christianity, Judaism), holidays (Memorial Day, Halloween) and registered trademarks (Xerox, General Electric)  Except at the beginning of a sentence, do not capitalize the word “the” before a formal name: He attends the Ohio State University Intentionally Blank Page | 42
    • Do Not Capitalize  Do not capitalize words such as college, school, department, office, division, association, and conference when they stand alone, even if they refer to a specific, previously identified entity  Lowercase job titles (president, professor) when they are not used before a proper name; unofficial names of departments or offices (the communications office); nouns used with numbers to designate chapters, rooms, pages, etc. (chapter 1, room 234, page 125); derivative adjectives (french fries); simple directions (the east coast of Maryland)  Names of school or college studies, fields of study, options, curricula, major areas, or major subjects, except languages, unless a specific course is being referred o Dan is majoring in biology with a minor in American history  The words or abbreviations a.m., p.m., baccalaureate, federal, state, government, honors, page, and paragraph  Names of seasons (winter, spring, summer, fall), including references to semesters  Plural words that refer to multiple preceding terms that individually would be capitalized o The Oaks Faculty House is located at the corner of Dudley and Bluford streetsCaptions for photos  Use a caption if there is a person, place, or situation that the reader is likely to want to identify  Use (left), (from left), or the like if there might be confusion about who‟s who  Do not use a middle initial if the full name with initial is already in the story  Do not use periods in captions that are not full sentences Page | 43
    • Cities  Capitalize city when used as part of a proper name: New York City, but lowercase elsewhere e.g., a Maryland city, the city government, the city of Baltimore  In running text, some cities do not need to be identified by state. These include Atlanta, Baltimore, Berkeley, Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Dallas, Denver, Detroit, Honolulu, Houston, Indianapolis, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Nashville, New Orleans, New York, Oklahoma City, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Pittsburgh, Salt Lake City, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle, and St. Louis  Foreign cities commonly associated with a country do not need a country identification (e.g., London, Bangkok, Tokyo, Toronto)Conferences, lecture series, symposia, etc.  Capitalize formal names (the National Conference on Citizen Science and Community Engagement)Contact information  To avoid dating a publication that will be in use for a long period of time, use a job title rather than a name in contact information unless there‟s a compelling reason for using a name  For invitations and materials with a very short lifespan, using a name is preferredCourse titles  Capitalize  Do not put in quotation marks or italicizeCourtesy titles  After a first reference, subsequent references generally use only a person‟s last name, except in obituaries. We should not use Mr., Mrs., Ms., Dr., Rev., Dean, and Professor in second references except in quoted materialCurriculum  A single plan of study. The plural is curricula Page | 44
    • Dates  Use a single hyphen to show a range of dates and do not repeat the first two numbers of the year if the second year is part of the same century as the first: 1991-94; 2001-02; 1999-2002  If the day of the month appears, use a comma before and after the year: Please return your application by the January 15, 2002, deadline  Do not use a comma between the month and the year alone: Please return your application by the January 2002 deadline  Only use the year with the month only it is not the current year  Times come before days and dates: at 4:00 p.m. Friday; at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, June 7  Do not abbreviate months  Use numerals for decades: the 1960s; the „60sDepartment, Office, Degree, and Program Names  • All academic departments are “Department of …,” when referred to formallyDisabilities  People with disabilities, not the disabled or disabled people  Avoid words like victim, afflicted, and stricken  Do not use normal to mean the opposite of having a disabilitye-mail  Hyphenate and lowercase e-mail except at the beginning of a sentence  Most dictionaries now define e-mail as a verb as well as a noun, but you should use it sparingly in formal writing  Avoid ending a sentence with an e-mail address; readers may think that the period ending the sentence is part of the address  Try to avoid breaking a line in the middle of an e-mail address  If an address absolutely cannot fit on one line, do not introduce hyphenation when breaking it, and do not break the line at a punctuation mark (a dot or slash) within the address Page | 45
    • Faculty  Use as a plural noun to refer collectively to the teachers within an educational institution or department: Many PSU and OHSU faculty will participate in the conference and each committee will consist of faculty, staff, and studentsFellowships and other awards  The formal name is capitalized (Fulbright Fellowship), but informal references (Fulbright grant) are notForeign words  In general, italicize unless it is an Americanized word or it is commonly usedFreshman, freshmen  If possible, use first-year student insteadFundraising  One word; there is no hyphenHeadlines  The formality of the publication and the design determines the use of downstyle or upper- and lowercase headlines, but once we choose a style, we should follow it consistently within a publication. In downstyle headlines, we capitalize the first word and proper nouns. In upper- and lowercase headlines, every word is capitalized except articles (a, an, the), coordinate conjunctions (and, or, for, nor), prepositions, and to in infinitivesHispanic  Latina or Latino is more politically correct, but Hispanic is acceptable. Defer to the subject‟s preferenceInitials  Use middle initials in formal publications unless a person prefers otherwise  Be consistent from person to person in use of the middle initial  Two initials should be separated by a space (J. P. Morgan)  In scientific citations, it is acceptable to use only a single initial and a last name, but not in running text Page | 46
    • International students  Preferred over foreign studentsInternet  • Capitalize  • See also e-mail and websitesInvitations  • Invitations do not require end-of-line punctuation  • Numbers greater than 10 may be spelled out  • Street numbers may be spelled out  • O‟clock or :00 are acceptable in detailing the time of an eventLecture titles  Put quotation marks around the formal titleLists  Do not use a colon after a verb or a preposition introducing a list (members include Smith, Morgan, and Griffin instead of members include: Smith, Morgan, and Griffin) except when the introductory phrase contains some variation of the following or as follows, or when the list is so long as to require bullets  Maintain parallel construction in listed items  Avoid numbering unless there will be a reference to the numbers in later text  If you must number a list in running text, place numbers (without periods) in parentheses  In bulleted lists, use a period after each item if one or more is a complete sentence. In that case, we should capitalize the first words of the items. Otherwise, capitalization of the first words depends on the context  Alphabetize or put listed items in some other logical order Page | 47
    • Names  There is no comma before Jr., Sr., or III  There is no space between initials (J. P. Morgan)Gender-neutral language  Use whenever possible: chair, police officer, actor, etc.  One way to get around the dilemma of his or her dilemma is to recast in the pluralNumbers  Spell out one through nine; use numerals for 10 and above  Spell out first through ninth; thereafter, use 10th, 11th, etc.  Use two letters with 22nd, 23rd, etc.  Do not add a numeral in parentheses after the use of a number word o Incorrect: We need nine (9) more votes for the bill to pass  Use numerals with percent (1 percent), dollar sign ($3), temperature (6 degrees), scores (7-3), page (page 2), room (room 9), and chapter (chapter 6)  Always spell out numbers at the beginning of a sentence  For figures greater than 999,999, use million or billion: 2.3 million, 4 billion  Use a comma in a figure greater than 1,000 unless it is a date  For inclusive numbers, only its final two digits should represent the second number if its beginning digit(s) are the same as the first: pages 343-47  Do not use a dash to substitute for to in a range: from 1967 to 1983, not from 1967-83  Use hyphens when writing phone numbers o 503-725-8987 Page | 48
    • Offices  Capitalize the formal names of all offices (e.g. Office of the President, Student Life Office, etc.)Online  Do not hyphenateParentheses  If the material inside the parentheses ends a sentence but is not itself a complete sentence, place the period outside the closing parenthesis (as in this example)  (If the material inside the parentheses is a complete sentence, as in this example, capitalize the first word and place the period inside the closing parenthesis)Periods  Always go inside quotation marks  See parentheses (right above this entry) for information about how to use periods with themStaff  • Generally used for all OHSU and PSU employees who are not faculty or administrators  Symbols  In text, spell out the words percent, degrees (temperature), feet, inches, and cents. In tables, it is acceptable to use symbols for these  Amounts greater than 99 cents should be in numerals with a dollar sign ($4)The  Lowercase before the name of an organization, business, or other group, no matter how they capitalize it: He attended the Johns Hopkins University  Capitalize at the start of titles of publications or works of art if it is part of the formal title: The Washington Post, The Canterbury TalesTitles (dissertations, theses)  Capitalize and place in quotation marks Page | 49
    • Titles (legal citations)  Italicize and use v. for “versus”: Brown v. Board of EducationTitles (organizations)  Names of associations, organizations, conferences, meetings, etc., follow the same guidelines as for compositions, except that the article the preceding a name is lowercased even when it is part of the formal title and the organization capitalizes it. Use the group‟s punctuation and abbreviations for its name  Use Co. when a business uses the word as part of its formal name. Inc., Corp., and Ltd. are usually not needed but when used after the name of a corporate entity should be abbreviated  Such words as club, team, and conference are lowercased when used aloneUpperclass students  If possible, use juniors and seniors insteadWebsites, the Web  Capitalize Web in reference to the World Wide Web  Lowercase website and use as one word  Writing out World Wide Web is not necessary; Web is sufficient  We do not need to start a Web address with http:// unless the address does not start with www., or there might be some confusion about whether it is a Web address  Use homepage as one word, unhyphenated  Use database as one word  Avoid ending a sentence with a Web address; readers may think the period ending the sentence is part of the address. In running text, it may be helpful to set off the Web address in parentheses or put it in midsentence  Try to avoid breaking a line in the middle of a website or e-mail address  If an address absolutely cannot fit on one line, do not introduce hyphenation when breaking it, and do not break the line at a punctuation mark (a dot or slash) within the address Page | 50
    • Checklists  Here are three checklists that we should use when creating content for the web or for publication6Style Checklist  Are your sentences concise  Do you address the user directly, using personal pronouns (you, us, we)  Have you removed all unnecessary adjectives  Have you used the active voice only  Does the content give the reader options for action  Have you used spell-checked and used consistent spelling, capitalization, and tense  Have you ensured that the content is culturally appropriate when necessaryEditorial Checklist  Have you organized the content so that the most important information comes first  Have you broken content down into easily read sections  Have you included specific data rather than generalizations  Have you explained all technical terminology and jargon  Does the content address specific user needs6Adapted from Curtis, C. (n.d.). Voice and tone guidelines: editorial strategy. Retrieved July 30, 2012, fromhttp://www.cullencurtiss.com/images/Voice_and_Tone_Guidelines.pdf Page | 51
    • Instructional Content Checklist  If an action requires multiple steps, have you informed the user about each of them  Have you referenced each task, and informed users about how to accomplish each of them  Have you provided user with adequate notice about critical actions, e.g., tasks that the reader cannot reverse, options that may not be relevant  Have you included complete information and been thoroughly specificAdditional ReferencesAssociated Press Stylebook websiteMiriam-Webster DictionaryWeb Writing Intentionally Blank Page | 52
    • Templates  Microsoft Word letterhead  Microsoft fax cover sheet  Microsoft Word press release shell  Microsoft Word report shell  Microsoft PowerPoint  Email footer  #10 envelopes  Business card Page | 53
    • Figure 1: Logo and Fonts Page | 54
    • Figure 2: Letterhead, Envelopes, and Business Cards Page | 55
    • Figure 3: Press Release Template and Fax Cover Sheet Page | 56
    • Figure 4: Report Template Page | 57
    • Figure 5: Email Signature Page | 58
    • Figure 6: Power Point Template Page | 59
    • Appendix HOutreach ToolsFirst Trimester Prenatal Care Coalition Invitation Letter[Insert Date], 2013Dear (Name):Policy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women a research translation, data analysis, and community outreach organization invitesyou to serve on a health coalition to raise awareness about a key women‟s health issue: improving the health of women afterpregnancy and their children. In pursuit of its mission PATH for women not only provides the [insert name] coalition with relevantand accurate information to encourage and support their efforts to develop effective, evidenced-based policy initiatives, we alsoidentify potential collation members.You have been identified as a potential coalition member for the [insert name] coalition organized by [insert organization] based onyour work on public health and community issues generally or women‟s health issues specifically around the issue of first trimesterprenatal care.A coalition is only as effective, culturally competent, and relevant as the broad range of perspectives on health care and expertise inhealth and community issues that its members represents. We believe that your background, interests, and passion will help the[insert name] coalition develop policies, programs and interventions that can help prevent and improve care for women withdiabetes.PATH for women is the result of a strategic partnership between OHSU Center for Women‟s Health (CWH) and Portland StateUniversity‟s Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program. PATH for women draws its evidenced based health related informationform CWH‟s Making the Grade on Women‟s Health: A National and State-by-State Report Card. As a coalition member, youwould have direct access to PATH for women’s expertise in translating research into effective programmatic policy, andwe would be pleased to support your organization’s advocacy efforts.In addition, as a coalition, as opposed to individual actors, we have a greater chance of increasing (1) the number of communityreferrals to maternal health programs; (2) the dissemination of and accuracy of educational material about the importance of earlyprenatal care, the effects of high-risk pregnancy, and impact of maternal health on health outcomes among women after pregnancyand upon their children; and (3) the number of collaborative direct service interventions among members.If you would consider becoming a member of the [insert name] coalition, please let them know at [insert e-mail address]. Please besure to mention that you learned about the [insert name] coalition from PATH for women. You can learn more about [insert name]coalition by visiting their website at [insert address] or calling their Program Coordinator at (xxx) xxx-xxxx. You can also learn moreabout the Report Card at http://hrc.nwlc.org and about PATH for women at www.pdx.edu/ws/PATH for womenIf you have questions or concerns, please contact Torrie Fields, PATH for women Co-Director of Outreach, at tkfields@pdx.edu or(503) 922-3270.Sincerely, Sincerely,Jamie Ross, PhD Michelle Berlin, MD, MPHCo-Director, Outreach PATH for women Director, Research, PATH for womenAssistant Professor, PSU Associate Director, OHSUWomen, Gender, & Sexuality Studies Program Center for Women‟s Health Page | 60
    • Diabetes Coalition Invitation Letter[Insert Date], 2013Dear (Name):Policy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women a research translation, data analysis, and community outreach organization wouldlike you to consider becoming a member of a health coalition to raise awareness about a key issue: preventing and improving carefor women with diabetes. In pursuit of its mission PATH for women not only provides the [insert name] coalition with relevant andaccurate information to encourage and support their efforts to develop effective, evidenced-based policy initiatives, we also identifypotential coalition members.You have been identified as a potential coalition member for the [insert name] coalition organized by [insert organization] based onyour work on public health and community issues generally, or women‟s health issues specifically, around the issue of diabetes.A coalition is only as effective, culturally competent, and relevant as the broad range of perspectives on health care and expertise inhealth and community issues that its members represents. We believe that your background, interests, and passion will help the[insert name] coalition develop policies, programs and interventions that can help prevent and improve care for women withdiabetes.PATH for women is the result of a strategic partnership between OHSU Center for Women‟s Health (CWH) and Portland StateUniversity‟s Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department. PATH for women draws its evidenced based health relatedinformation form CWH‟s Making the Grade on Women‟s Health: A National and State-by-State Report. As a coalition member,you would also have direct access to PATH for women’s expertise in translating research into effective programmaticpolicy and we would be pleased to support your organization’s advocacy efforts.In addition, as a coalition, as opposed to individual actors, we have a greater chance of increasing (1) the number of referrals forcare, presentations, and workshops for women with diabetes; (2) the distribution of and the accuracy of diabetes-related healthinformation disseminated to the public and other stakeholders; and (3) the number of collaborative direct service interventionsamong members.If you would consider becoming a member of the [insert name] coalition, please let them know at [insert e-mail address]. Please besure to mention that you learned about the [insert name] coalition from PATH for women. You can learn more about [insert name]coalition by visiting their website at [insert address] or calling their Program Coordinator at (xxx) xxx-xxxx. You can also learn moreabout the Report Card at http://hrc.nwlc.org and about PATH for women at www.pdx.edu/ws/PATH for womenIf you have questions or concerns, please contact Torrie Fields, PATH for women Co-Director of Outreach, at tkfields@pdx.edu or(503) 922-3270.Sincerely, Sincerely,Jamie Ross, PhD Michelle Berlin, MD, MPHCo-Director, Outreach PATH for women Director, Research, PATH for womenAssistant Professor, PSU Associate Director, OHSUWomen, Gender, & Sexuality Studies Program Center for Women‟s Health Page | 61
    • Advisory Committee Invitation Letter[Insert Date], 2013Dear (Name):Policy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women a research translation, data analysis, and community outreach organization invitesyou to serve on a newly formed Outreach Program Advisory Committee. In pursuit of its mission, PATH for women provides healthcoalitions, legislators, community organizations, and advocacy groups with relevant and accurate information to encourage andsupport their efforts to develop effective, evidenced-based policy initiatives. In addition, we identify potential strategic partners forour collaborators.You have been identified as a potential advisory committee member based on your work on public health and community issuesgenerally, or specifically women‟s health issues. PATH for women will only be as effective, culturally competent, and relevant as thebroad range of perspectives on health care and expertise in health and community issues that it uses to guide its programdevelopment and organizational processes. We believe that your background, interests, and passion will help the PATH for womensuccessfully meet its mission.PATH for women is the result of a strategic partnership between OHSU Center for Women‟s Health (CWH) and Portland StateUniversity‟s Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department. PATH for women draws its evidenced based health relatedinformation form CWH‟s Making the Grade on Women‟s Health: A National and State-by-State Report. As a member of theadvisory committee, you would have direct access to PATH for women’s expertise in translating research into effectiveprogrammatic policy and we would be pleased to support your organization’s advocacy efforts.The main role of the Outreach Program Advisory Committee is to advise, assist, and support the efforts of PATH for women staffand directors as your expertise and energy allow. There will be an initial meeting where PATH for women will provide an overview theorganization, its objectives, a description of CWH‟s Making the Grade on Womens Health Report Card, and the health status andpolicy indicators that the report card identified by as a concern for womens health in Oregon. Committee members will then havean opportunity to identify the indicators that they wish to help PATH for women address. Thereafter we will host an annual meetingto complete a year-end review and discuss PATH for women’s goals for the following year. Lastly, we may contact you throughout theyear with specific requests for assistance and advice.If you would consider being a member of this PATH for women Outreach Program Advisory Committee, please let us know using thee-mail address below. We look forward to hearing from you and appreciate your consideration. You can learn more about the ReportCard at http://hrc.nwlc.org and about PATH for women at www.pdx.edu/ws/PATH for women. If you have questions or concerns,please contact Torrie Fields, PATH for women Co-Director of Outreach, at tkfields@pdx.edu or (503) 922-3270.Sincerely, Sincerely,Jamie Ross, PhD Michelle Berlin, MD, MPHCo-Director, Outreach PATH for women Director, Research, PATH for womenAssistant Professor, PSU Associate Director, OHSUWomen, Gender, & Sexuality Studies Program Center for Women‟s Health Page | 62
    • Appendix IBudget Worksheet Page | 63
    • Situational Analysis Report on PATH for women Written by: Amanda Phillips Approved by: Jamie Ross, PhD and Torrie Fields, MPH August 30, 2012 1633 SW Park Avenue, Suite 221, Portland, OR 97207
    • Table of ContentsTable of Contents ................................................................................................................................................................ iSituational Analysis ............................................................................................................................................................. 1 Organizational Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1 Purpose and Scope of the Situational Analysis.......................................................................................................... 2 Situational Analysis Process .......................................................................................................................................... 2 External Analysis ............................................................................................................................................................ 3 Oregon......................................................................................................................................................................... 3 National ....................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Stakeholder Analysis.................................................................................................................................................. 7 Potential Collaborators/Strategic Partners ............................................................................................................ 7 Internal Analysis ............................................................................................................................................................. 9 People .......................................................................................................................................................................... 9 Financial Outlook ...................................................................................................................................................... 9 Competencies ........................................................................................................................................................... 10 Organizational Culture, Structure, and Oversight .............................................................................................. 11 Marketing Capacity and Technology .................................................................................................................... 11 Present Strategy ........................................................................................................................................................ 12 Performance ............................................................................................................................................................. 12 SWOT Analysis ............................................................................................................................................................ 14 Organizational Challenges .......................................................................................................................................... 15 Solutions/Alternative Strategies ................................................................................................................................ 16Bibliography ....................................................................................................................................................................... 17Appendix A ........................................................................................................................................................................ 19 Organizational Framework ......................................................................................................................................... 19 Page | i
    • Appendix B ........................................................................................................................................................................ 20 Strategic Planning Process Map and Worksheets ................................................................................................... 20Appendix C ........................................................................................................................................................................ 25 Potential Collaborators/Strategic Partners Organizational Descriptions ........................................................... 25 Local........................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Regional and National ............................................................................................................................................. 26Appendix C ........................................................................................................................................................................ 30 Anticipated Program Operating Budget ................................................................................................................... 30Appendix D ....................................................................................................................................................................... 31 PATH for women Business Model/Process Map .................................................................................................. 31 Page | ii
    • Situational AnalysisOrganizational BackgroundMichelle Berlin M.D., M.P.H. an Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU) physician and researcher,founded the Policy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women in 2004. PATH for women was a response tothe critical need for current, evidence-based information concerning women’s health for use toward policyimplementation and it is now a strategic partnership between the OHSU Center for Women’s Health (CWH)and Portland State University’s Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department (WGSS). PATH forwomen’s revised mission is to provide accurate, high-quality community driven research, data, and analysis toinform women’s health policy and to serve as an independent source of data, analysis, and coalition capacity-building for the public, advocates, and policymakers.PATH for women has expanded from its original emphasis on creating and translating scientific research toinform women’s health policy to include coalition capacity building and community outreach. As a result,PATH for women has two divisions (see Appendix A). One focuses on research and the other focuses onoutreach. The outreach division is housed at WGSS and it aims to develop meaningful relationships withinterested community members, community organizations, public health professionals, educators, andpolicymakers regarding issues facing women in Oregon, such as Women with Diabetes and Women withFirst Trimester Prenatal Care. The outreach division draws its evidenced-based health related informationfrom the Making the Grade on Women’s Health: A National and State-by-State Report Card (ReportCard).The Report Card has been published since 2000. The 5th edition, and most current Report Card evaluates 34health status and 68 health policy indicators and assesses progress in reaching key benchmarks and policyobjectives for each state and for the nation as a whole. Oregon is currently demonstrating a failing grade intwo indicators: Women with Diabetes and Women with First Trimester Prenatal Care.The research division is housed in CWH where Michelle is a lead author of the aforementioned Report Card(see http://hrc.nwlc.org/). The research division aims to serve as a national and regional resource for dataanalysis, including the provision of accurate and current research concerning women’s health and evidence-based analysis of key issues that specifically affect efficiency, cost, and outcomes of the health of women. Page | 1
    • Purpose and Scope of the Situational AnalysisSituational analyses are meant to “provide information on the strengths and weaknesses of [an] organizationin relation to the opportunities and challenges it faces” (Bryson, 2004, p. 124). This situational analysis is apart of the strategic planning process, and it will inform the development of an organizationalcommunications plan, a stakeholder analysis, and a strategic plan. This situational analysis assesses thechallenges and opportunities that both the outreach and research divisions of PATH for women face. Thestrategic planning team conducted this analysis after they created PATH for women’s mission, vision, andvalues, but before the team developed a list of critical issues that the organization faces (Bryson, 2004, p.124).Situational Analysis ProcessThis situational analysis is a result of PATH for women’s summer 2012 strategic planning activities. PATH forwomen developed this situational analysis with the assistance of a PSU student. This team mainly utilized thestrategic planning framework described by John M. Bryson (2004) in Strategic Planning for Public and NonprofitOrganizations and the strategic planning worksheets from Bryson’s (2005).Creating and implementing your strategicplan: a workbook for public and nonprofit organizations. The process map, as well as the SWOT worksheets thatwere completed during the development of this situational analysis can be found in Appendix B. Thissituational analysis then provided context for PATH for women’s strategic plan. Intentionally Blank Page | 2
    • External AnalysisPATH for women’s external environment is comprised of collaborators, community groups, the Oregon HealthAuthority, and numerous other city, state, and federal agencies. In addition, external issues such as legislation(the Affordable Care Act), the economy, and workforce shortages also shape the health care environment inOregon. As a result, there are many competing agendas and issues, so positioning PATH for womenappropriately within the political and health reform landscape is critical for the organization’s success.OregonDemographicsThe Census Bureau estimates that Oregons current population is 3,871,859 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012) andthat the population should grow to 4,260,393 by July 1, 2020 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2005).In addition, Oregon’s population is aging. In 2010 13.9% of the population was over the age of 65 (U.S.Census Bureau, 2012) and the number of people 60 years and older, as well as those 85 years and older isexpected to continue to grow (Buedefeldt & Haas, 2005). The diversity of Oregon’s population is alsoprojected to increase. See Table 1 below.Table 1: Female Population Projections for Oregon, Race, and Hispanic Origin: 1995 to 20251 July 1, 1995 July 1, 2000 July 1,2005 July 1, 2015 July 1, 2025White Females 1,494,000 1,606,000 1,698,000 1,856,000 1,999,000Black Females 27,000 32,000 37,000 44,000 52,000American Indian, 22,000 26,000 28,000 32,000 37,000Eskimo, Aleut FemalesAsian and Pacific 48,000 61,000 71,000 92,000 114,000Islander FemalesHispanic Females 69,000 92,000 113,000 156,000 210,000Non-Hispanic White 1,431,000 1,523,000 1,595,000 1,712,000 1,807,000FemalesAdapted from Campbell, P. R. (1996). Projected state populations, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin: 1995-2025. Report#45. Retrieved August 21, 2012, from U.S. Bureau of the Census, Population Division:http://www.census.gov/population/projections/state/stpjrace.1 Note Population numbers rounded to nearest thousand. Page | 3
    • Figure 1 illustrates the overall age distribution of Oregon women in 2009, 2010, and 2011. The majority ofwomen in Oregon are over the age of 65 and this ratio is expected to grow as the overall population ages.Nevertheless, the next largest category is women who are of childbearing age (15—44 years). These statisticsstress that new programs Oregon and organizations such as PATH for women will need to support thedevelopment of new programs to meet the needs of women who are past their reproductive years.Figure 1: Female Population in Oregon 2009-2011 16% 65+ 15% 15% 27% 45-65 27% 27% Female Population 2011 Female Population 2010 39% 15-44 39% Female Population 2009 40% 18% 0-15 18% 19% 0.00% 10.00% 20.00% 30.00% 40.00% 50.00%Source: Portland State University Population Research Center. 2009-2012 Annual Oregon Population Reports. Retrievedfrom http://www.pdx.edu/prc/annual-oregon-population-report. See bibliography for full citation.Economic Environment  Oregons median income from 2006-2010 was $49,260, but 14.1% of Oregonians were beneath the federal poverty level during this time (U.S. Census Bureau, 2012)  Economic conditions are expected to continue to improve, but the overall pace of improvement is slower than previously anticipated. In addition, the level of improvement differs by community, with rural communities showing the least amount of economic improvement.  Job recovery will be ongoing until 2014 (State of Oregon, Department of Administrative Services, Office of Economic Analysis, 2012)  Revenue growth will be slower and, “…will face considerable downward pressure over the 10-year extended forecast horizon” (Office of Economic Analysis, 2012) Page | 4
    • Oregon’s Changing Health SystemThere is a recognized need for more information on the extent, root causes, and possible solutions for healthdisparities among women of various racial/ethnic populations, classes, geographic locations and of the overallU.S. female population versus men. Current and emerging federal and state policy indicate the need forshared accountability in improving targeted health outcomes on a local and regional level among researchers,policymakers, community organizations, leaders, and members.As public health-related funding decreases at the federal and state levels, and racial and ethnic healthdisparities increase, it is imperative that organizations pool knowledge resources. PATH for women seeks to fillthis gap. While the issues of evidenced-based interventions, research translation, and health disparities are atthe forefront of media coverage, academic debates, and policy development efforts PATH for women’s pastactivities have received limited exposure. Nevertheless, the current systemic focus on these issues and themedia’s receptiveness to providing coverage demonstrates that there is an opportunity for PATH for women toachieve its communications and overall strategic goals.NationalResearch EnvironmentAccording to the Institute of Medicine (2010) researchers face a variety of issues including decreased fundingand increased competition, as well as:  Difficulty prioritizing clinical research questions  A divide between clinical research, clinical practice, legislators, and patients  Globalization of clinical trials  Increased Cost  Reduced incentives for physician-participation in clinical research  Shrinking workforce  Complex administrative and regulatory requirements  Recruitment and retention of patients Page | 5
    • Academic EnvironmentPATH for women is a strategic partnership between two universities, PSU and OHSU. Similar to other highereducational institutions, PSU and OHSU are facing their own unique sets of external challenges. OHSU isknown as a leading health education and research university whereas PSU is currently known as an urbanpublic university. Nevertheless, one of PSU’s 2011-2014 strategic goals is to increase its visibility as aninnovative research institution. Therefore, both research and public university challenges should providecontext for PATH for women’s strategic planning process.According to Caldwell (2005) the major challenges that public universities face include  Changing student demographics that require new business models  Rapid changes in technology, and altered learning styles, modes, and sites make a complex environment  Strategic partnerships and collaboration, not just competition are critical to success  Reduced funding to students and institutions to finance education  Outdated, unclear, or undefined missions and visions neither explain the value of the institutions nor assist with appropriately positioning the institutionsIn contrast, according to the Research Universities Futures Consortium (2012) the challenges that researchuniversities face include  Hypercompetition for scarce resources and the increased complexity of managing them  Increased regulation diverts time and resources to compliance instead of research  Research metrics are outdated. They are tied to the amount of grant dollars instead of the quality and outcomes of the research  Not enough strategic planning and outcome evaluation to guide research decisions  Failure to communicate the value of the research university model to the public and key stakeholders  The level of complexity and the pressures associated with administration and leadership Page | 6
    • Stakeholder AnalysisPATH for women conducted a Stakeholder Analysis as part of the strategic program development processfor its coalition capacity building initiative. The target stakeholders included community organizations andnonprofits (many of which are grassroots organizations); trade associations; hospitals and direct serviceproviders; research programs; and government programs and organizations. Key findings include  Many of the target stakeholders for both coalitions are large organizations(diabetes n=32; prenatal care n=18) versus small or medium  Few of the target stakeholders are trade associations among (diabetes n=1; prenatal care n=5)  Most of the target stakeholders are community organizations (diabetes n=41; prenatal care n=12), closely followed by government programs and organizations (diabetes n=12; prenatal care n=9)  Only 3 target stakeholders are in rural areas  The target stakeholders have a high level of legislative capacity (diabetes = 94%; prenatal care = 87%)For additional information, see the internal document entitled Stakeholder Analysis: Assessment and Analysis ofStakeholders for Two Issues: Diabetes and First Trimester Prenatal Care for PATH for women’s Coalition Empowerment andCapacity Building Program.Potential Collaborators/Strategic PartnersUnlike a business or corporation, PATH for women does not view organizations with similar missions andprograms as competitors. Instead, PATH for women views them as existing or potential collaborators andstrategic partners. As discussed above, PATH for women itself is a strategic partnership between OHSU andPSU. Page | 7
    • In addition, PATH for women currently collaborates closely with  March of Dimes, Oregon Chapter  Oregon Women’s Health and Wellness Alliance  Strategies360 Advocacy Group  Oregon Diabetes ProgramAdditional local, regional, and national potential collaborators who have conducted or may be interested inwomen’s health policy and/or research include the following. (See Appendix C: Potential Collaborators/StrategicPartners Organizational Descriptions for a full description of each organization using information sourced fromtheir websites).Local  African Women’s Coalition  Acumentra Health  Center for Evidenced-Based Policy at OHSU  Center for Women, Politics & Policy at PSU  Institute for Sustainable Solutions at PSU  Oregon Center for Public Policy  Oregon Health Care Quality Corporation (Q Corp)  Oregon Health Policy and ResearchRegional and National  Black Womens Health Imperative formerly the National Black Women’s Health Project  Center for Women’s Health Research  Institute for Women’s Policy Research  Jacob’s Institute of Women’s Health  Kaiser Family Foundation  Mautner Project  National Academy for State Health Policy Page | 8
    •  National Women’s Health Network  National Women’s Health Resource Center or HealthyWomen (HW)  National Women’s Law Center  Society for Women’s Health Research  Women’s Healthcare Associates  Women’s Health Research Coalition  Women’s Policy Inc.Internal AnalysisPeopleJamie Ross, PhD, Assistant Professor, Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies (WGSS), Portland StateUniversity and Co-Director of PATH for women’s outreach division has a long-time commitment to addressingsocial determinants of health through community education and outreach. She has worked with the SabinCommunity Development Corp., Planned Parenthood, O.G.A.L.L.A. (Basic Rights of Oregon), PortlandState University’s Task Force on Adolescent Sexual Minority Issues and the Safe Space Alliance for SexualMinorities.Michelle Berlin, MD, MPH, OHSU Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Vice Chair for Public Health,Policy and Community Service, Associate Director of the OHSU Center for Women’s Health and Director ofPATH for women’s research division is co-author of Making the Grade on Women’s Health: A National and State-by-State Report CardTorrie Fields, MPH, Co-Director of Outreach, has a background in health management and policy, andservice in local community organizations. Ms. Fields has received numerous community service awards inpublic health with her voluntary direct service and evaluation of quality improvement projects withorganizations such as the Oregon Food Bank, Oregon Health Care Quality Corporation, Multnomah CountyHealth Department, Planned Parenthood, and the National Cervical Cancer Coalition.Financial OutlookPATH for women relies on a combination of in-kind donations and grant funding. Through consistent effortsto increase the organization’s financial stability PATH for women recently received an Equity Foundation grant.As shown in Appendix C, PATH for women’s anticipated operating budget for its coalition support activities is$33,000. This budget does not include the cost of implementing its 2012-2015 strategic plan. Therefore,PATH for women must continue to pursue funding opportunities aggressively in order to achieve its goals. Page | 9
    • CompetenciesPATH for women applies a multidisciplinary approach to women’s health issues that is based on research. Thisinvolves gathering evidence, analyzing data, and creating pathways, and at times solutions that lead to betterhealth outcomes. PATH for women draws on a wide range of community connections to help developworkable solutions by:  Tracking local, regional, and national performance on women’s health  Performing data analysis  Highlighting women’s health issues with policy implications  Helping community organizations develop their qualitative data and case study development capabilities  Translating research findings for policy, media, and the public  Bridging the research-to-action gap by presenting complicated, technical information in clear language and user-friendly formatsPATH for women’s staff have complementary skill sets. According to the staff (PATH for women, n.d.), theircombined areas of expertise include  Performing clinical research that provides the foundation for policy development  Analyzing data for use in public health planning and clinical care  Researching health inequalities among differing groups of women  Looking at ethical aspects of providing care to women  Developing and testing different approaches to providing care  Integrating key aspects of women’s health in medical training  Translating research results for involved parties ranging from community members to providers and legislators Page | 10
    • Organizational Culture, Structure, and OversightPATH for women has an open or organic organizational design and culture. Everyone is a hands-oncontributor and feels comfortable sharing ideas and opinions. PATH for women also has high-levels of lateralcommunication, and its lateral communication is less about mandates and more like advice (T. Burns &Stalker, 1994, pp. 121-122). It also possesses a network structure, continually redefines tasks, and knowledgeis spread throughout the network (T. Burns & Stalker, 1994, pp. 121-122). PATH for women is currently toosmall to have a true organizational structure, but the division between the research and outreach divisions ofthe organization seems to indicate that as the organization grows that PATH for women will group itself byservice population.Currently, the co-directors of outreach manage the outreach efforts. They inform the director of researchabout their activities and routinely seek her advice, but they are responsible for the operations and futuregrowth. The director of research operates in a similar fashion. That said, the directors caucus, and attempt toachieve consensus on any matters that affect the overall organization.Culturally, PATH for women operates as one organization. As a result, communication both internally andexternally is important. In fact, communication is one of the organizations’ values. Additional values includehonesty, collaboration, empowerment, respect, integrity, and diversity. In addition, PSU’s belief thatknowledge should serve the city and the phrase “knowledge is meant to be shared,” which the staffcontinually uses, further illustrates PATH for women’s commitment to communication, as well as honesty andempowerment. See Appendix D for a detailed organizational process map.Lastly, PATH for women must balance its mission, vision, values, and organizational culture with the differingcultures and goals of a research and teaching hospital, and a public university that is actively attempting tobecome a leading research university.Marketing Capacity and TechnologyPATH for women does not have a staff person dedicated to business development. Instead, PATH for womenstaff undertakes marketing on an ad hoc basis. The principal way that the organization has tried to gainvisibility is through one-on-one meetings with decision-makers and letter writing campaigns. This lack ofmarketing capacity hampers PATH for women’s ability to increase its reach and relevance within thecommunity. In order to increase its visibility, PATH for women needs additional dedicated staff to producecontent and to create opportunities to engage and communicate with a variety of stakeholders through avariety of mediums.In addition, PATH for women is neither optimizing its use of the free or low-cost information systems andapplications that it has access to through PSU, nor integrating these resources into its business processes. Forexample, PATH for women has access to tools such as Qualtrics, Google Documents, and Google Analytics.These are all applications that can expand PATH for women’s operational capacity. Page | 11
    • Present StrategyIn 2004, PATH for women held a strategic planning workshop and conducted a series of interviews. Theseactivities produced the following aims:Short term:  Serve as a national and regional resource for data analysis, including the provision of accurate and current data concerning state-by-state women’s health status, with state and federal performance compared to national and regional goalsIntermediate:  Work directly with private entities, as well as state, regional and national legislators and staff to assure that stakeholders are knowledgeable about key and emerging women’s health issues, including those best addressed by changes in health policy legislation  Create public/private partnerships to educate health professionals and diverse communities about these key issues and interventions available to develop and maintain a healthy community  Conduct specific evidenced-based analysis of key issues that specifically impact efficiency, cost and outcomes of the health of womenLonger-term:  Train scholars in women’s health epidemiology and public policy analysis to assure ongoing in-depth research and analysis of emerging areas of concern  Develop, implement, and analyze model interventions based on the best scientific evidencePerformanceHistorySince 2004, the outreach division of PATH for women has  Identified key areas in womens health with policy impact and developed materials for use by community groups, local organizations, and the public to influence policy development and implementation  Interpreted the results of health studies for policymakers, the media, and the public  Analyzed and translated existing evidence-based research for policymakers and the public Page | 12
    • Some key past activities and contributions to improving women’s health include:  2006 Health Policy Summit  2009 webinar on strategies to prevent and detect cervical cancer  Provision of policy testimony for the 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2012 legislative sessions through the Oregon Women’s Health and Wellness Alliance o Provided research to support the passage of HB 2666, which formed the Maternal Mental Health Workgroup, during the 2009 legislative session  Provided representation on this workgroup to develop recommendations on advocacy and education around maternal mental health disorders o Provided research to support SB 460 (2009) and HB 2236 (2011), which addressed the development of a birth anomalies registry, during the legislative sessions o Provided research to support HB 2726, which is the Oregon Indoor Clean Air Act Expansion, during the 2010-2011 legislative session o Provided research to support HB 2726, which addressed hookah smoking and its disproportionate effect on teenaged girls during the 2010-2011legislative sessionScorecard, Indicators, and ResultsPATH for women must improve its ability to track and evaluate its past programs and initiatives. As part of its2012-2015 strategic planning process, PATH for women intends to identify and incorporate best practices intoits processes and procedures, and to develop and utilize tools to measure its performance. Intentionally Blank Page | 13
    • SWOT Analysis Strengths Weaknesses 1. Highly grounded in feminist 1. Inadequate fiscal resources methodologies 2. Lack of formal strategic partnership between 2. Relationship with OHSU and PSU OHSU and PSU 3. Good employee morale. Staff excited and 3. Low visibility, target audiences unaware passionate about what they do and the 4. Limited staff and marketing resources range of personal experiences reflect and 5. Limited web presence inform the new mission/vision/values 6. No social media presence 4. Access to research 7. Differing organizational cultures (PSU & 5. Networking abilities OHSU) makes it hard to navigate the 6. Bridge between qualitative and organizations quantitative analyses 8. Competition within PSU for assistance with 7. Experience translating research into policy grants 8. Navigate between legislators and 9. Lack a cohesive brand and messages researchers 10. Limited communication infrastructure 9. Founders reputation 10. Responsive to community needs Opportunities SWOT Threats 1. New funding and untapped funding 1. Changing healthcare environment streams 2. Lack of sustainable funding for organization and 2. Increased focus on womens health Report Card 3. Institutional level OHSU and PSU 3. Changing PSU budget and operations model strategic partnership and stronger 4. Changing OHSU operations model relationships with WGSS 5. Changing demographics 4. Changing demographics 6. Navigating the academic hierarchy 5. Media support/coverage 6. Increased focus on evidenced based interventions 7. Health care reform a high profile issue and it is an election year 8. Increased focus on health disparities 9. Social Media 10. Additional relationship opportunities e.g., the advisory committee and more ties with researchers Page | 14
    • Organizational ChallengesPATH for women’s transition into a multi-division organization has produced some organizational challenges.These challenges include  A shift in PATH for women’s core mission  The need for a vision that encompasses the entire organization and values that will guide the pursuit of the mission and vision  Ensuring that both divisions are financial sustainable  Limited organizational capacity  Identifying and developing the most promising product lines  Utilizing the most efficient operational model(s)  Employing innovative yet appropriate strategies and tactics to achieve its mission  Managing organizational change effectively  Gaining visibility, positioning the organization correctly, and increasing PATH for women’s relevance locally and regionally Intentionally Blank Page | 15
    • Solutions/Alternative StrategiesPATH for women has several alternative strategies that it can employ to ensure that the organization addressesboth the weaknesses and threats outlined in the SWOT analysis, as well as the emerging opportunities.  Develop measurement and evaluation tools and processes. Measuring success will help PATH for women balance long-term and short-term actions, and demonstrate efficiency and effectiveness  Optimize the use of available tools provided by PSU and OHSU e.g., a dedicated website , e-mail address and other Google products  Create an organizational strategic communications plan and tools to implement the plan  Leverage current partnerships and create new relationships  Increase community capacity to meet women’s needs  Increase staff capacity o Greater utilization of PSU’s students and service learning programs  Aggressively pursue funding opportunities and the staff capacity to pursue them Intentionally Blank Page | 16
    • BibliographyBuedefeldt, R., & Haas, J. (2005). Oregon state plan on aging. Salem, OR.Burns, T., & Stalker, G. M. (1994). The management of innovation (p. 269). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Bryson, J. M. (2004). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations: a guide to strengthening and sustaining organizational achievement (3 ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Caldwell, R. (2005, July 2005). Critical challenges for public universities. Retrieved August 22, 2012, from The University of Arizona, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences: http://ag.arizona.edu/~caldwell/roger/challenges%20for%20universities%20-%20july%208- 2005.pdfCamillus, J. C. (2008, January 1). Strategy as a wicked problem. Harvard Business Review, 86(5), pp. 98-101.Campbell, P. R. (1996). Projected state populations, by sex, race, and hispanic origin: 1995-2025. Report #45. Retrieved August 21, 2012, from U.S. Bureau of the Census, Population Division,: http://www.census.gov/population/projections/state/stpjrace.txtDas, T. K. (1987, April 1). Strategic planning and individual temporal orientation. Strategic Management Journal, 8(2), 203-209.Institute of Medicine. (2010). Transforming clinical research in the United States: challenges and opportunities: workshop summary. Forum on Drug Discovery, Development, and Translation. Washington, D.C.: The National Academy Press. Retrieved August, 22 2012, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK50892/pdf/TOC.pdf.PATH for women. (n.d.). About PATH for women. Retrieved August 23, 2012, from http://www.ohsu.edu/xd/health/services/women/about-us/policy-and-advocacy/path-for-women- details.cfmPatterson, S. J., & Radtke, J. M. (2009). Strategic communications for nonprofit organization: seven steps to creating a successful plan (2 ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.Portland State University Population Research Center. (2010). 2009 Annual Oregon population report. Portland: Retrieved from http://pdx.edu/prc/annual-oregon-population-report.Portland State University Population Research Center. (2011). 2010 Annual Oregon population report. Portland: Retrieved from http://www.pdx.edu/prc/annual-oregon-population-report.Portland State University Population Research Center. (2012). 2011 Annual Oregon population report. Portland: Retrieved from http://pdx.edu/prc/annual-oregon-population-report. Page | 17
    • Research Universities Futures Consortium. (2012, June). The current health and future well-being of the american university. Retrieved August 22, 2012, from Research Universities Futures: www.researchuniversitiesfutures.orgSchmeer, K. (1999). Policy toolkit for strengthening health sector reform. In Stakeholder analysis guidelines . Bethesda, MD: Abt Associates, Inc.State of Oregon, Department of Administrative Services, Office of Economic Analysis. (2012, May 22). Oregon economic and revenue forecast summary. Retrieved August 21, 2012, from Office of Economic Analysis: http://cms.oregon.gov/DAS/OEA/docs/economic/press0612.pdfU.S. Census Bureau. (2005). Table A1: interim projections of the total population for the United States and States: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2030.U.S. Census Bureau. (2012). Oregon quickfacts from the US census bureau. Retrieved from http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/41000.html Page | 18
    • Appendix A Organizational Framework PATH for women Outreach Research Jamie Ross, PhDMichelle Berlin, MD, MPH Torrie Fields, MPH Page | 19
    • Appendix BStrategic Planning Process Map and WorksheetsSource Bryson, J. M. (2004). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations: a guide to strengthening andsustaining organizational achievement (3 ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Page | 20
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    • Appendix C Potential Collaborators/Strategic Partners Organizational DescriptionsLocalAfrican Women’s CoalitionTo mobilize, advocate and empower African Women living in Oregon and Southwest Washington byproviding a culturally supportive and nurturing environment that builds the capacity of the community tohelp itself and allows other members of the community to reach their highest potential through support,guidance, and educational opportunities.Acumentra HealthAcumentra Health is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the quality and effectiveness ofhealthcare. They collaborate with practitioners, providers, health plans, public agencies, and privateorganizations on a wide range of healthcare improvement projects and programs. Acumentra Health alsoworks with beneficiaries, healthcare professionals, and the public to improve healthcare quality and protectthe Medicare Trust Fund.Center for Evidenced Based Policy at OHSUThe Center for Evidence-based Policy is a national leader in evidence-based decision-making and policydesign. We work with federal, state, and local policymakers in more than 20 states to use high-qualityevidence to guide decisions, maximize resources and improve health outcomes. Established in 2003, byOregon Governor John Kitzhaber, M.D., the Center works with a wide range of stakeholders to improvepublic policy through innovation, collaboration, and use of best evidence.Center for Women, Politics & Policy at PSUThe Center for Women, Politics & Policy is housed in the Hatfield School of Government in the College ofUrban & Public Affairs at Portland State University. The mission for the Center for Women, Politics &Policy is to increase womens leadership in public policy through targeted teaching and community serviceprograms. The Center works toward this goal by promoting scholarship that examines the presence and roleof women in politics and public policy and by providing service programs that will develop the nextgeneration of women leaders who will serve the city, state, region and nation.Institute for Sustainable Solutions at PSUThe Institute for Sustainable Solutions (ISS) advances sustainability research, education, and outreach atPortland State, leading the University to be a powerful catalyst and model for a more equitable, ecologicallybalanced, and economically vibrant future. Page | 25
    • Oregon Center for Public PolicyThe Oregon Center for Public Policy (OCPP) does in-depth research and analysis on budget, tax, andeconomic issues. Our goal is to improve decision-making and generate more opportunities for all Oregonians.Oregon Health Care Quality Corporation (Q Corp)Q Corp is a non-profit organization that brings measurable improvement to the quality of health care inOregon through better information and increased community-wide collaboration. Q Corp helps doctors,hospitals, insurers, providers, purchasers, government agencies and consumers work together to improvepatient safety and the quality of care.Oregon Health Policy and ResearchThe Office for Oregon Health Policy and Research (OHPR) conducts impartial, non-partisan policy analysis,research, and evaluation, and provides technical assistance to support health reform planning andimplementation in Oregon. The office serves in an advisory capacity to Oregon Health Policy Board, theOregon Health Authority, the Governor, and the Legislature.Regional and NationalBlack Womens Health Imperative formerly the National Black Women’s Health ProjectThe Black Womens Health Imperative (Imperative) is the only organization devoted solely to advancing thehealth and wellness of Americas 19.5 million Black women and girls through advocacy, community healthand wellness education and leadership development. Founded as the National Black Womens Health Projectin 1983 by health activist and McArthur genius Byllye Y. Avery, the Imperative promotes optimal health forAfrican American women across their lifespan - physically, mentally, and spiritually.Center for Women’s Health ResearchThe Center for Women’s Health Research at the University of Colorado’s School of Medicine is located onthe Anschutz Medical Campus. Were funding and training the next generation of scientists in the field ofwomens health. And were providing critical information to women, their families, their practitioners, andtheir communities through seminars, luncheons, and special events.Institute for Women’s Policy ResearchThe Institute for Women’s Policy Research conducts rigorous research and disseminates its findings toaddress the needs of women, promote public dialog, and strengthen families, communities, and societies. It isthe leading think tank in the U.S. focusing primarily on domestic women’s issues. Founded in 1987, IWPR’sreports and other informational resources have informed policies and programs across the U.S., in each of itskey program areas: Page | 26
    • Jacob’s Institute of Women’s HealthThe Jacobs Institute of Womens Health (JIWH) is a nonprofit organization working to improve health carefor women through research, dialogue, and information dissemination. The Jacobs Institute works tocontinuously improve the health care of women across their lifespan and in all populations. The JacobsInstitute promotes environments where an interdisciplinary audience, including health care professionals,researchers, policymakers, consumers, and advocates come together to discuss ways to advance womenshealth.Kaiser Family FoundationKaiser Family Foundation is a non-profit, private operating foundation focusing on the major health careissues facing the U.S., as well as the U.S. role in global health policy. Unlike grant-making foundations, Kaiserdevelops and runs its own research and communications programs, sometimes-in partnership with other non-profit research organizations or major media companies. The Foundation aims to provide policymakers,journalists, advocates, and public health practitioners with current analysis on the policies in health financingand delivery that affect women. The particular challenges faced by women at risk for experiencing accessbarriers, such as those on Medicaid, those who are uninsured, and racial and ethnic minorities, are a specialfocus.Mautner ProjectMautner Project is committed to improving the health of women who partner with women including lesbian,bisexual and transgender individuals, through direct and support service, education and advocacy.National Academy for State Health PolicyThe National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) is an independent academy of state healthpolicymakers. We are dedicated to helping states achieve excellence in health policy and practice. A non-profitand non-partisan organization, NASHP provides a forum for constructive work across branches and agenciesof state government on critical health issues. Our funders include both public and private organizations thatcontract for our services.National Women’s Health NetworkThe National Womens Health Network was founded in 1975 to give women a greater voice within thehealthcare system. NWHN is a membership-based organization supported by 8,000 individuals andorganizations nationwide. We do not accept financial support from pharmaceutical companies, tobaccocompanies, or medical device manufacturers. Page | 27
    • National Women’s Health Resource Center or HealthyWomen (HW)HealthyWomen (HW) is the nations leading independent health information source for women. Our coremission is to educate, inform and empower women to make smart health choices for themselves and theirfamilies. Page | 28
    • National Women’s Law CenterSince 1972, the Center has expanded the possibilities for women and girls in this country. We have succeededin getting new laws on the books and enforced; litigating groundbreaking cases all the way to the SupremeCourt, and educating the public about ways to make laws and public policies work for women and theirfamilies. Today, an experienced staff of nearly 60 continues to advance the issues that cut to the core ofwomens lives in education, employment, family and economic security, and health and reproductive rights—with special attention given to the needs of low-income women and their families.Society for Women’s Health ResearchThe Society for Women’s Health Research (SWHR), a national non-profit organization based inWashington DC, is widely recognized as the thought leader in research on sex differences and isdedicated to improving women’s health through advocacy, education, and research.Founded in 1990 by a group of physicians, medical researchers and health advocates, SWHR aims to bringattention to the myriad of diseases and conditions that affect women uniquely. Due to SWHR’s efforts,women are now routinely included in most major medical research studies and scientists are beginning toconsider biological sex as a variable in their research.Women’s Healthcare AssociatesWomen’s Healthcare Associates, LLC has been serving women and their families in Portland in various formssince the 1940s. With the October 2011 merger of Women’s Clinic, PC, Women’s Health Center of Oregon,PC, and Women’s Healthcare Associates, LLC, our collective history includes decades of leadership in themedical community and commitment to our patients.Women’s Health Research CoalitionThe Women’s Health Research Coalition is an advocacy network of more than 600 leaders at academicmedical, health and scientific institutions, as well as other interested associations, foundations, individuals andorganizations, who have joined together to encourage coordination of and funding for women’s healthresearch and for the study of sex- and gender-based differences.Women’s Policy Inc.Womens Policy, Inc. (WPI) champions the interests of women throughout the country on the mostsignificant social, economic, and health issues across the public policy spectrum. WPI is a nonprofit,nonpartisan organization whose sole focus is to help ensure that the most informed decisions on keywomens issues are made by policymakers at the federal, state, and local levels. Audiences include electedofficials, regulators, womens groups, labor groups, academia, the business community, the media, and thepublic. Page | 29
    • Appendix C Anticipated Program Operating Budget2Item Stimson-Miller Equity In- Total Foundation Foundation Kind BudgetSalaries and WagesJamie Ross 0.17 FTEMichelle Berlin 0.05 FTEGrant Writer /hr, 40 hours $SuppliesLetterhead per box $ $Letterhead Set-up $ $CommunicationsConference Call Line $ $Travel $ $Training/Networking/OutreachOutreach Campaign $ $ $Coalition Meeting Support $ $TOTAL DIRECT COSTS $ $ $Administration Cost from PSU $ $Foundation (5%)PROGRAM TOTAL $ $ $PSU Foundation Annual Operating Budget Amount: $1,651,240Total Project Cost: $33,053Amount Requested of Stimson-Miller Foundation: $Amount Requested From Other Funders: $ (Equity Foundation)2 Prepared by PATH for women as part of its Stimson-Miller grant application Page | 30
    • Appendix D PATH for women Business Model/Process Map Outreach offers research tostakeholders based on its knowledge Research leverages either its existing data or its of their needs e.g., upcoming network of researchers to meet the request(s) program development and advocacy and translates data into actionable informationplans; or responds to routine requests for information Outreach sends the request to the research division where research is translated or data aggregated and analyzed Coalitions Community Organizations Network of Outreach Research researchers Legislators Advocacy Providers of Groups qualtiative/quantitative data pertaining to womens health issues A few key stakeholders. They request the research Outreach continues to make strategic partnerships and builds the network of researchers. This transalation, data ,or data analysis. Note that network includes research/teaching hospitals, practitioners, health institutes/societies, and may coaltions include community organizations, include direct service organizations that collect qualitative data and/or produce case studies. advocacy groups, trade associations , government agencies, and direct service organizations et. al. Funded by grants, in-kind contributions from volunteers, and philanthropic donations Page | 31
    • Strategic Plan 2012-2015 Written by: Amanda Phillips, JD, MPHApproved by: Jamie Ross, PhD and Torrie Fields, MPH August 29, 2012 1633 SW Park Avenue, Suite 221, Portland, OR 97207
    • Table of ContentsTable of Contents ................................................................................................................................................................ iExecutive Summary ............................................................................................................................................................ 1 Who We Are ................................................................................................................................................................... 1 Critical Issues and Strategic Goals ............................................................................................................................... 2About the Plan Process ...................................................................................................................................................... 3Mission.................................................................................................................................................................................. 3Vision .................................................................................................................................................................................... 4Core Values and Guiding Principles ................................................................................................................................ 5Situational Analysis ............................................................................................................................................................. 6 SWOT Analysis .............................................................................................................................................................. 6 PATH for women Business Model/Process Map .................................................................................................... 7 Organizational Challenges ............................................................................................................................................ 8Underlying Assumptions ................................................................................................................................................... 9 Three-Year Strategic Goals and Strategies ............................................................................................................... 10Bibliography ....................................................................................................................................................................... 14Appendix A ........................................................................................................................................................................ 16 Organizational Framework ......................................................................................................................................... 16Appendix B ........................................................................................................................................................................ 17 Strategic Planning Process Map and Worksheets ................................................................................................... 17 Page | i
    • Executive SummaryWho We AreMichelle Berlin M.D., M.P.H. an Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU) physician and researcher,founded the Policy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women for women in 2004. PATH for women was aresponse to the critical need for current, evidence-based information concerning women’s health for usetoward policy implementation and it is now a strategic partnership between the OHSU Center for Women’sHealth (CWH) and Portland State University’s (PSU) Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department(WGSS). PATH for women’s revised mission is to provide accurate, high-quality community driven research,data, and analysis to inform women’s health policy and to serve as an independent source of data, analysis,and coalition capacity-building for the public, advocates, and policymakers.PATH for women has expanded from its original emphasis on creating and translating scientific research toinform women’s health policy to include coalition capacity building and community outreach. As a result,PATH for women has two divisions (see Appendix A). One focuses on research and the other focuses onoutreach. The outreach division is housed at WGSS and it aims to develop meaningful relationships withinterested community members, community organizations, public health professionals, educators, andpolicymakers regarding issues facing women in Oregon, such as Women with Diabetes and Women withFirst Trimester Prenatal Care. The outreach division draws its evidenced-based health related informationfrom the Making the Grade on Women’s Health: A National and State-by-State Report Card (ReportCard).The Report Card has been published since 2000. The 5th edition, and most current Report Card evaluates 34health status and 68 health policy indicators and assesses progress in reaching key benchmarks and policyobjectives for each state and for the nation as a whole. For example, according to the Report Card Oregon iscurrently demonstrating a failing grade in two indicators: Women with Diabetes and Women with FirstTrimester Prenatal Care.The research division is housed in CWH where Michelle is a lead author of the aforementioned Report Card(see http://hrc.nwlc.org/). The research division aims to serve as a national and regional resource for dataanalysis, including the provision of accurate and current research concerning women’s health and evidence-based analysis of key issues that specifically affect efficiency, cost, and outcomes of the health of women. Page | 1
    • Since 2004, the outreach arm of PATH for women has  Identified key areas in womens health with policy impact and developed materials for use by community groups, local organizations, and the public to influence policy development and implementation  Interpreted the results of health studies for policymakers, the media, and the public  Analyzed and translated existing evidence-based research for the public and policymakersCritical Issues and Strategic GoalsThe critical issues that the PATH for women strategic planning team identified are  How do we focus our search for grant funding in order to target "translation" grants and avoid applying for grants that are predominantly for direct services providers and researchers?  How do we gain a foothold in "policy forecasting" for womens health, that is, at the cutting edge of policy development and become a primary source of research data?  What can we do now to increase PATH for women’s visibility even more effectively, beyond the push we made this summer with our website, coalition letters, and advisory committee letters?  What can we do to increase our own research base beyond OSHU, the Report Card, and Healthy People 2020, as well as increase our organizational partnerships?This strategic plan addresses these critical issues by building upon the information gleaned from PATH forwomen’s 2004 strategic planning workshop and stakeholder interviews; its recent situational analysis, whichhelped outline what PATH for women does well and the environment in which it operates; its recentstakeholder analysis; and the organization’s revised mission, new clear concise vision, and new valuestatement.As part of its strategic plan, PATH for women shall pursue the following strategic goals:  Increase financial sustainability  Become the premier evidenced-based health policy advisory group in Oregon  Increase and maintain brand awareness  Increase PATH for women’s ability to respond to the research needs of its stakeholdersThis strategic plan will be implemented over a three-year period (2012-2015) and successful implementationwill help PATH for women take more of a leadership role in the public health community, explore additionalstrategic partnerships, and measure its outcomes. In addition, this strategic plan will provide a framework bywhich PATH for women can achieve its mission and work towards its vision, while embodying its values. Page | 2
    • About the Plan ProcessPATH for women develop this strategic plan during the summer of 2012 with the assistance of a PSU student.This team mainly utilized the strategic planning framework described by John M. Bryson (2004) in StrategicPlanning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations and the strategic planning worksheets from Bryson’s (2005)Creating and implementing your strategic plan: a workbook for public and nonprofit organizations. A process map, as wellas worksheets that were completed during the strategic planning process can be found in Appendix B. Theinformation contained in the worksheets includes, a SWOT analysis, critical organizational issues, and theunderlying assumptions of the strategic plan development process. This information was then used toarticulate the goals outlined in this plan. Therfore, this plan is a record of the strategic planning process andthe decisions that the strategic planning team made. PATH for women anticipates that the 2015-2018 strategicplan will be more inclusive, and will include feedback from key stakeholders.MissionPolicy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women’s mission is to provide accurate, high-quality communitydriven research, data, and analysis to inform women’s health policy and to serve as an independent source ofdata, analysis, and coalition capacity building for the public, advocates, and policymakers.Our research and coalition capacity building efforts help others understand how Oregon, other states, and thenation as a whole are progressing in womens health, help others to develop policies to advocate for women’shealth, and ensures that PATH for women is responsive to the community’s health, research, and informationneeds. With the nation lagging far behind critical benchmarks (standards) in health, the need for effectivepolicies and programs is increasing; we are dedicated to bridging the information gap between the academicresearcher, policymaker, service provider, and community member, and empowering communities to requestresearch and develop programs that improve women’s lives. Intentionally Blank Page | 3
    • VisionPATH for women is a strategic partnership OHSU’s Center for Women’s Health (CWH) and the Women,Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department at Portland State University. PATH for women seeks to become thepremier evidence-based womens health policy resource in Oregon and nationally by drawing from the mostrecent publication of CWH’s Making the Grade on Women’s Health: A National and State-by-StateReport Card and enabling the development of national and regional health policies, especially those targetedto improve performance in meeting national goals for womens health.To fulfill its vision PATH for women will:  Fully address the ongoing need for current, relevant, evidence-based health information by fostering problem-based scientific research at the undergraduate and graduate levels that is directly informed by the needs of the community, and is guided by an interdisciplinary approach that includes feminist models of scientific inquiry.  Translate and disseminate this evidenced-based research to direct service organizations, as well as state and national legislators, contributing to their policy advocacy efforts.  Become a critical link between Oregon’s coordinated health coalitions, as well as among coalition members comprised of the community at large; students; health policy advocates; health professionals; local, regional, and national direct service organizations; legislators; and researchers. Intentionally Blank Page | 4
    • Core Values and Guiding PrinciplesCommunication – We recognize the importance of an informed public and the need for accurate, highquality, community-driven research and data for policy advocacy. We are open, truthful, and timely with ourdissemination of information and by listening and responding to the needs of our coalition members andpolicymakers, we ensure that we provide relevant information.Honesty –We aim to empower communities by providing accurate and truthful information about issues thatdisproportionately affect the health of women.Collaboration – We engage community members by forming meaningful relationships and coalitions to raiseawareness about issues that disproportionately affect the health of women.Empowerment – We seek to empower coalition members to request research that will improve the lives ofwomen within their communities, and researchers to embrace new methods of scientific inquiry.Respect – We respect the dignity of all persons and honor the diverse contributions that stem from differingperspectives, cultures, backgrounds, and educational levels.Integrity – We foster, encourage, and expect the highest level of professionalism, ethical standards,transparency, and accountability in all that we do.Diversity – We aspire to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities by providing research data that is relevantto racially, ethnically, socio-economically, and sexually diverse women, and are committed to attracting andretaining coalition members who reflect these communities. Intentionally Blank Page | 5
    • Situational AnalysisIn accordance with the Bryon’s strategic planning process (see Appendix B) PATH for women conducted adetailed situational analysis before developing this strategic plan. Below are key highlights from this analysisincluding the SWOT chart, a business process map, and the organizational challenges that the situationalanalysis identified.SWOT Analysis Strengths Weaknesses 1. Highly grounded in feminist 1. Inadequate fiscal resources methodologies 2. Lack of formal strategic partnership between 2. Relationship with OHSU and PSU OHSU and PSU 3. Good employee morale. Staff excited and 3. Low visibility, target audiences unaware passionate about what they do and the 4. Limited staff and marketing resources range of personal experiences reflect and 5. Limited web presence inform the new mission/vision/values 6. No social media presence 4. Access to research 7. Differing organizational cultures (PSU & 5. Networking abilities OHSU) makes it hard to navigate the 6. Bridge between qualitative and organizations quantitative analyses 8. Competition within PSU for assistance with 7. Experience translating research into grants policy 9. Lack a cohesive brand and messages 8. Navigate between legislators and 10. Limited communication infrastructure researchers 9. Founders reputation 10. Responsive to community needs Opportunities SWOT Threats 1. New funding and untapped funding 1. Changing healthcare environment streams 2. Lack of sustainable funding for organization 2. Increased focus on womens health and Report Card 3. Institutional level OHSU and PSU 3. Changing PSU budget and operations model strategic partnership and stronger 4. Changing OHSU operations model relationships with WGSS 5. Changing demographics 4. Changing demographics 6. Navigating the academic hierarchy 5. Media support/coverage 6. Increased focus on evidenced based interventions 7. Health care reform a high profile issue and it is an election year 8. Increased focus on health disparities 9. Social media 10. Additional relationship opportunities e.g., the advisory committee and more ties with researchers Page | 6
    • PATH for women Business Model/Process MapOutreach offers research tostakeholders based on its Research leverages either its existingknowledge of their needs e.g., data or its network of researchers toupcoming program meet the request(s) and translates datadevelopment and advocacy into actionable informationplans, or responds to routinerequests for information Outreach sends the request to the research division where research is translated or data aggregated and analyzed Coalitions Community Organizations Network of Outreach Research researchers Legislators Advocacy Providers of Groups qualtiative/quantitative data pertaining to womens health issues A few key stakeholders. They request the research transalation, data ,or data analysis. Outreach continues to make strategic partnerships and builds the network of Note that coaltions include community researchers. This network includes research/teaching hospitals, practitioners, health organizations, advocacy groups, trade associations , government agencies, and institutes/societies, and may include direct service organizations that collect direct service organizations et. al. qualitative data and/or produce case studies. Funded by grants, in-kind contributions from volunteers, and philanthropic donations Page | 7
    • Organizational ChallengesPATH for women’s transition into a multi-division organization has produced some organizational challenges.These challenges include:  A shift in PATH for women’s core mission  The need for a vision that encompasses the entire organization and values that will guide the pursuit of the mission and vision  Ensuring that both divisions are financial sustainable  Strategic Planning and Organizational Development: ○ Limited organizational capacity ○ Identifying and developing the most promising product lines ○ Utilizing the most efficient operational model(s) ○ Employing innovative yet appropriate strategies and tactics to achieve its mission ○ Managing organizational change effectively  Gaining visibility, positioning the organization correctly, and increasing PATH for women’s relevance locally and regionallyFor more detailed information, see the internal document entitled Situational Analysis Report on PATH forwomen.) Page | 8
    • Underlying AssumptionsThese assumptions are the foundation of this strategic plan. If one of these assumptions prove false or thesituation changes then the strategic plan will ultimately have to be adjusted to reflect this change. Internal External Growth: Political:  Increased # of coalitions  Resources for community organizations will  Links to more organizations either decrease or remain at their current levels and stronger current despite increased demand relationships  Fewer community organizations will have the capacity to hire political analysts or lobbyists  Health care reform Staff: Socio-Cultural:  Hire a program coordinator  Increased diversity due to immigrants  More student involvement  More self-identification and communities e.g., interns requesting more culturally competent care  Overall change in demographics, growth and aging  Increased interest in personalized medicine  Shift from expert knowledge to experiential knowledge and lab based to community based research Fiscal: Economic:  Increased grant funding for  Decreased funding opportunities and more collaborative partnerships restrictive/detailed requirements  Possible improved economy Technological: Technological:  New website  Increased availability of national and regional  New social media presence sources of research e.g., widgets Research: Research:  New report card  Increased need for community based/need based  Greater understanding of research gendered research  Increase in community based participatory researched  More demands for evidenced based research in health disparities  Epigenetics Page | 9
    • Three-Year Strategic Goals and Strategies Responsibility - Priority Issue/Goal/Strategy/Objective/Activity (High 0-1 years) (Medium 1-2 years) (Low 2-3 years)Goal #1 (3 year impact): Increase financial sustainabilityStrategies (4-6 with a 1-3 year impact):  Create additional funding opportunities  Improve grant proposal success rate  Gain visibility within PSU in order to become a grant priority  Strengthen grant writing capacityObjective(s) (4-6 with a 1-3 year impact):  Create a roster of grant writing professionals willing to work for a reduced fee or to donate services High  Develop an intern program Medium  Increase grant writing capacity High  Target translational grants and avoid applying of grants that are for direct service providers and researchers MediumActivities (yearly):  Present PATH for women to 4 new PSU/OHSU stakeholders e.g., Center for Women, Politics & Policy Jamie – High  Develop a grant writing process guide Torrie – High  Seek WGSS support for recruiting 2 student interns Jamie – Medium  Collaborate with PSU grant writing classes to enlist student help with ongoing grant proposals and build Torrie/Jamie – High relationships with future grant writing professionals with the aim of 1 project per class  Conduct a national scan for translational grant opportunities and create a list including timelines Torrie – Medium  Hire a Program Coordinator Team – Low  Assess the potential for philanthropic support Torrie – Low  Apply for a minimum of 8-10 grants each year with the aim of securing one fully-funded grant each year Torrie/Jamie – High Page | 10
    • Responsibility - Priority Issue/Goal/Strategy/Objective/Activity (High 0-1 years) (Medium 1-2 years) (Low 2-3 years)Goal #2 (3 year impact): Become the premier evidenced-based health policy advisory group in OregonStrategies (4-6 with a 1-3 year impact):  Increase local and regional relevance  Develop leadership role in women’s health policy development  Become proactive versus reactive  Incorporate strategic planning into operations  Support and enable effective women’s health policy developmentObjective(s) (4-6 with a 1-3 year impact):  Create new partnerships with decision makers and those who advise them High  Position PATH for women appropriately within the political landscape High  Understand and appropriately support stakeholder policy development needs High  Implement strategic planning and measurement processes High  Develop PATH for women’s value proposition to the local women’s health policy development process HighActivities (yearly):  Develop a needs assessment PSU Student – High  Conduct a needs assessment Torrie – High  Leverage the Report Card and create the necessary evidenced-based products Torrie – Medium  Conduct a stakeholder analysis PSU Student – High  Conduct a situational analysis PSU Student – High  Create a brand/value proposition and develop, and execute a strategic communications plan PSU Student – High  Meet twice a year to check progress and assess the need for revisions, create tools to measure pre-and-post activity results, and formally revisit this plan at the start of Year 3 (summer 2015) to start the cycle anew Team – Medium Page | 11
    • Responsibility - Priority Issue/Goal/Strategy/Objective/Activity (High 0-1 years) (Medium 1-2 years) (Low 2-3 years)Goal #3 (3 year impact): Increase and maintain brand awarenessStrategies (4-6 with a 1-3 year impact):  Continue to increase visibility  Ensure swift, clear, consistent communicationsObjective(s) (4-6 with a 1-3 year impact):  Deepen relationships with policy advocates within community organizations and lobbyists High  Cultivate new support bases High  Increase capacity for sustained marketing/communications HighActivities (yearly):  Maintain and deepen community partnerships through outreach Torrie – Medium  Reach out directly to key decision-makers and those who advise them Torrie – Medium  Proactively monitor the political landscape Torrie – High  Continue to identify and target community organizations with upcoming policy issues Torrie– High  Create opportunities for community engagement, such as classes on how to use data for legislative purposes Torrie/Intern – Medium  Hire a communications/social media intern Jamie – Medium  Consistently revise/update communication tools and materials, including the website Intern – Medium  Measure the effectiveness of communications activities Intern – Medium  Revise strategic communications plan yearly Team – Medium Page | 12
    • Responsibility - Priority Issue/Goal/Strategy/Objective/Activity (High 0-1 years) (Medium 1-2 years) (Low 2-3 years)Goal #4 (3 year impact): Increase PATH for women’s ability to respond to the research needs of its stakeholdersStrategies (4-6 with a 1-3 year impact):  Solicit qualitative data and case studies  Develop a regional network of women’s health researchersObjective(s) (4-6 with a 1-3 year impact):  Complement quantitative expertise with qualitative information Medium  Educate community partners about the value of qualitative research Medium  Create a roster of researchers who are willing to provide data to PATH for women on a variety of indicators MediumActivities (yearly):  Conduct presentation to community partners about how to use qualitative data for legislative purposes Torrie – Medium  Maintain and deepen partnerships with researchers through outreach Team – Medium  Attend local conferences and network with targeted researchers Team – Medium  Proactively monitor the research being conducted regionally Torrie/Michelle – High  Conduct need assessment and use it to guide outreach efforts to researchers Torrie/Intern – High  Submit 1-2 papers each year on the use of evidence based research in policy development to peer reviewed Team – Medium journals Page | 13
    • BibliographyBryson, J. M. (2004). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations: a guide to strengthening and sustaining organizational achievement (3 ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Bryson, J. M. (2004). What to do when Stakeholders matter. Public Management Review, 6(1), 21-53.Bryson, J. M. (2005). Creating and implementing your strategic plan: a workbook for public and nonprofit organizations. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Camillus, J. C. (2008, January 1). Strategy as a wicked problem. Harvard Business Review, 86(5), pp. 98-101.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. Using evaluation to improve programs: Strategic planning kit. 2008. Retrieved at HYPERLINK "http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/evaluation/pdf/sp_kit/sp_toolkit.pdf" http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/evaluation/pdf/sp_kit/sp_toolkit.pdfColorado Nonprofit Association. (2011, July). Nonprofit help desk, faqs and resources: communications toolkit Parts 1, 2, and 3. Retrieved July 23, 2012, from Colorado Nonprofit Association: http://www.coloradononprofits.org/help-desk-resources/nonprofit-help-desk/faqs- resources/communications/Gelmon, S.B., Foucek, A., & Waterbury, A. (2005). Program evaluation: Principles and practices, 2nd ed. (pp. 10-12). Portland: Northwest Health Foundation. Retrieved from http://nwhf.org/images/files/NWHF_Program_Eval_Handbook.pdf . Martinelli, F. (2004). Strategic planning: Charting your course for success. The Learning Institute for Nonprofit Organizations. Retrieved from http://www.nonprofitcourses.org/li/samples/guide.pdfMartinelli, F. (2004). Strategic planning: Charting your course for success. The Learning Institute for Nonprofit Organizations. Retrieved from HYPERLINK "http://www.nonprofitcourses.org/li/samples/guide.pdf" http://www.nonprofitcourses.org/li/samples/guide.pdfMartinelli, Frank (Interviewee). (n.d.) Q&A with Faculty Strategic Planning [Broadcast Transcript]. Retrieved from Learning Institute for Nonprofit Organizations collaboration website: HYPERLINK "http://www.uwex.edu/ces/cced/nonprofits/management/q-a1.cfm" http://www.uwex.edu/ces/cced/nonprofits/management/q-a1.cfm itcourses.org/li/samples/guide.pdfPatterson, S. J., & Radtke, J. M. (2009). Strategic communications for nonprofit organization: seven steps to creating a successful plan (2 ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.Schmeer, K. (1999). Policy toolkit for strengthening health sector reform. In Stakeholder analysis guidelines . Bethesda, MD: Abt Associates, Inc. Page | 14
    • U.S. Army Security Assistance Command: Command Information Office. (n.d.). Strategic communication plan. Retrieved August 9, 2012, from U.S. Army Security Assistance Command: http://www.army.mil/info/organization/usasac/ Page | 15
    • Appendix AOrganizational Framework PATH for women Outreach Research Jamie Ross, PhD Michelle Berlin, MD, MPH Torrie Fields, MPH Page | 16
    • Appendix BStrategic Planning Process Map and WorksheetsSource Bryson, J. M. (2004). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations: a guide to strengthening and sustaining organizationalachievement (3 ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Page | 17
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    • July 28, 2012 PATH for women Strategic Planning BasicsLooking ahead from the SWOT: identify critical strategic issues and then develop goals, strategies, objectives,and activities to address those issues.Critical Issues:These issues are fundamental policy or program concerns that define the most important situations and choicesan organization faces now and in the future. Critical issues can reflect long-standing problems in theorganization or the community served, recent events that are anticipated to have a significant impact on theorganization and/or community served as well as obstacles to the PATH for women’s goals. They can alsoreflect a major shift in the overall environment.Examples: 1. How can we attract and retain highly qualified and engaged coalition members? 2. How can we attract and retain a diverse membership on the advisory committee? 3. How can we increase our funding, in order to support our anticipated program initiatives?Goals: These are broad statements of the general desired result. A goal is a general statement of an intendedoutcome of a particular organization. Some questions that the goal(s) answer include what is the overall contextof the organization. What does the program seek to accomplish? Organizations may have a single overarchinggoal, or they may have multiple goals that address the intended outcomes of different elements of the program.At the start, determine if the team is creating goals that apply for 3 or 5 years. Due to PATH for women’s sizeand the volatility of the external environment, I recommend 3-years.Examples:Goal 1: Financial SustainabilityStrengthen the overall grant portfolio of PATH for women Page | 22
    • Strategies: These are statements of the major approach or method (the means) for attaining the broad goals andresolving specific issues. A program strategy is the means or broad approach by which a program will achieveits goals. Useful strategies capitalize on program strengths or opportunities, or correct program weaknesses anddefend against threats.Examples: Develop a corporate donor cultivation and fundraising programObjectives: These are derived from the program goal(s) and are specific statements of steps and outcomesneeded to carry out the core strategies. The statements can be short-term or long-term, but they must bemeasurable, achievable, relevant (it directly supports the goal), and supported by timelines. Objectives arewritten in an active tense and use strong verbs like plan, write, conduct, produce, etc. rather than learn,understand, or feel.Examples:1.1 Create a list of potential donors and grants by first quarter of 20131.2 Secure 1-2 fully funded grants by the end of 2014Activities: These are tasks that operationalize the objectives.Examples:1.1 X employee create a funding pitch including a presentation and prospectus for potential donors by second quarter of 20131.2 Y employee apply for 8 to 10 grants with the aim of securing a minimum of 1 fully funded grant by the end of 2014Adapted from the following:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. Using evaluation to improve programs: Strategic planning kit. (200). Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/evaluation/pdf/sp_kit/sp_toolkit.pdfGelmon, S.B., Foucek, A., & Waterbury, A. (2005). Program evaluation: Principles and practices, 2nd ed. (pp. 10-12). Portland: Northwest Health Foundation. Retrieved from http://nwhf.org/images/files/NWHF_Program_Eval_Handbook.pdf.Martinelli, F. (2004). Strategic planning: Charting your course for success. The Learning Institute for Nonprofit Organizations. Retrieved from http://www.nonprofitcourses.org/li/samples/guide.pdfMartinelli, Frank (Interviewee). (n.d.) Q&A with Faculty Strategic Planning [Broadcast Transcript]. Retrieved from Learning Institute for Nonprofit Organizations collaboration website: http://www.uwex.edu/ces/cced/nonprofits/management/q- a1.cfmitcourses.org/li/samples/guide.pdf Page | 23
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    • Critical Issues WorksheetReflect on the information we gathered in the SWOT exercise e.g., internal strengths/weaknessesemerging trends, or external opportunities or threats, and list 3-5 most critical issues facing theorganization over the next 3 years. Try to word the statements in the form of questions:1. How do we focus our search for grant funding in order to target "translation" grants and avoid applying for grants that are predominantly for direct services providers and researchers?2. How do we gain a foothold in "policy forecasting" for womens health, that is, at the cutting edge of policy development and become a primary source of research data?3. What can we do now to increase PATH for women’s visibility even more effectively, beyond the push we made this summer with our website, coalition letters, and advisory committee letters?4. What can we do to increase our own research base beyond OSHU, the Report Card, and Healthy People 2020, as well as increase our organizational partnerships?Adapted from Martinelli, F. (2004). Strategic planning: Charting your course for success. The Learning Institute forNonprofit Organizations. Retrieved from http://www.nonprofitcourses.org/li/samples/guide.pdf Page | 25
    • Program Strategy ChecklistThe purpose of this checklist is to help you assess whether the strategies previously selected are appropriate.Criteria to assess each program strategy Yes NoIs it expressed in a declarative statement that starts with a verb?Does it describe a single program action and the object of the action?Does it connect logically to the program goal?Is it broader than a program objectiveIs it broader than a work plan activity?Does data indicate the need for the strategy?Does the strategy do one or more of the following?  Stay consistent with mission, vision, and values  Build on program strengths  Reduce the influence of program weaknesses  Build on program opportunities  Reduce the influence of program threatsAfter assessing each program strategy for the criteria in the table, examine those strategies that received oneor more answers of No; and consider how to revise them. Some strategies may simply need re-writing. Forexample, to describe a single program action. Other strategies may need to be deleted and replaced. Forexample, a strategy for which data do not indicate a need should be replaced with a strategy that does addressa need. Having useful strategies will make your strategic plan a more helpful tool for annual programplanning.Adapted from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. Using evaluation toimprove programs: Strategic planning kit. 2008. Retrieved athttp://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/evaluation/pdf/sp_kit/sp_toolkit.pdf Page | 26