Assessing Organizational Cultureat the Center for Student Health        and Counseling           Amanda           Phillips...
Why assess organizational          culture?• Defining organizational culture …a collective understanding, a shared and int...
The Three Levels of Culture1. Artifacts2. Espoused Beliefs and   Values3. Basic Underlying   Assumptions
Artifacts
Espoused Beliefs and Values I    The Center for Student Health and Counseling      (SHAC) is a community-based health care...
Espoused Beliefs and Values IIValue: QualityProfessionalServicesValue: Equitableaccess to servicesValue: Importanceof huma...
Basic Underlying Assumptions•These are unconscious, taken-for- granted beliefs and values•They determine behavior, percept...
ReferencesSchein, E. H. (2010). Organizational culture and leadership. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
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Assessing Organizational Culture at the Center for Student Health and Counseling

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  • Artifacts Visible and feelable structures and processes Observed behavior Difficult to decipher Espoused Beliefs and Values Ideals, goals, values, aspirations Ideologies Rationalizations May or may not be congruent with behavior and other artifacts Basic Underlying Assumptions Unconscious, taken-for-granted beliefs and values Determine behavior, perception, thought
  • See Building: The SHAC is located at the corner of SW Hall and 6th Avenue. Unlike other PSU buildings such as Unisys, the SHAC is seems centrally located in PSU's campus. What is odd is that on the same block as the SHAC is a McDonalds. The juxtaposition of the two organizations is striking. Once you enter the building, you immediately notice the layout of the lobby. There are signs that clearly indicate where you should go, and where you should stand. The signs as well as the dividers also show how serious the SHAC is about protecting student privacy. The receptionists are seated behind a low counter, which makes them seem approachable. The SHAC's dispensary is towards the back of the space, which affords students some privacy as they pick up their prescriptions. The limited number of chairs near the dispensary and the position of the chairs also ensure that students do not feel pressured or that bystanders can easily discern the private details of their conversation. As you approach the dispensary, you also see trays of free medication, contraception and other purse sized items that students may need but neglect to purchase due to constrained budgets. Since students are already in the right frame of mind (they are requesting or picking up a prescription), they will be more likely to stop and avail themselves of these items. The SHAC is made up health, counseling, testing, and dental services units. Health and counseling services are located on the first floor, while dental and testing services are on the third floor. The third floor is not as open or inviting as the first floor. In addition, it is harder to determine where you need to go once you get to the third floor since (unlike the first floor) the third floor is not exclusively used by the SHAC. Technology: Each receptionist has a workstation with a computer. It seems that the SHAC is using scheduling software and has a sophisticated telephone and messaging system. Each patient room also has a computer where the medical services provider can access your patient records. The dispensary is also equipped with a computer. The website is clear and conveys a wide variety of information so that students can learn about the organization, their rights as patients, and ways to improve their health. Students can also find forms and refill their prescription through the website. Art: On the sidewalks as you approach the SHAC are some metal sculptures and as you walk up the steps, you see similar art on the landing and the door. This entrance, which also includes what seems like a wall of glass, gives the building a modern feel. Hear The SHAC has its own terms that it uses such as testing services, counseling, individual or group sessions, insurance, co-pay, deductible, fees, credit hours, regular vs. self-support, mental health, urgent care, dental and prescriptions. In addition, The SHAC circulates an e-news letter, its website has multiple FAQ sections and a team dedicated to promoting health and wellness at PSU and within the community. Feel That the SHAC is here to stay and that it is eager to help students. The sign is large and welcoming. In addition, the SHAC's staff are always open, personable, and helpful. The SHAC also gives the impression that it values customer feedback, quality, and continual improvement of its services. The front page of the website has a survey, it sends out an annual survey and the SHAC is constantly asking students what more can the SHAC do for you. 
  • SHAC is guided by a holistic perspective that considers the overall well-being and academic success of a student as a balance between the emotional, physical, social, intellectual, environmental, and spiritual aspects of life. SHAC continually works to balance the provision of quality, accessible professional services to as many students as possible within the realistic limitations of available resources. SHAC recognizes the importance of embracing diversity among people, in all its aspects, with awareness, appreciation and intention. SHAC promotes reciprocal learning between caregivers and the students they serve.
  • Helping students succeed is a benchmark for success - It is part of the SHAC's mission and it grounds their programming and the way they approach the SHAC's role at PSU and within the community.  Structurally we may be a hiearchy but we are also a family - As evidenced by the SHAC’s mission and values, the SHAC is committed to its relationships with PSU and the students and views them as partners. In addition, leasership is constantly working with the employees to ensure that they feel that they are a part of a company that values them, their input, and their efforts. Good leaders must have referent and expert power, and practice a participatory leadership style - The Executive Director and many of the unit Directors have doctorates in their field. As Directors they are required to inspire their staff and resolve any tension that arises from trying to work towards the SHAC's goals and from working with the other units. In addition, they are required to not only lead but solicit and listen to feedback.
  • Assessing Organizational Culture at the Center for Student Health and Counseling

    1. 1. Assessing Organizational Cultureat the Center for Student Health and Counseling Amanda Phillips PA 510 May 14, 2012
    2. 2. Why assess organizational culture?• Defining organizational culture …a collective understanding, a shared and integrated set or perceptions, memories, values and attitudes that have been learned over time and which determine the expectations of behavior that are taught to new members in their socialization into the organization.• Understanding culture for organizational change
    3. 3. The Three Levels of Culture1. Artifacts2. Espoused Beliefs and Values3. Basic Underlying Assumptions
    4. 4. Artifacts
    5. 5. Espoused Beliefs and Values I The Center for Student Health and Counseling (SHAC) is a community-based health care organization that provides high quality, accessible mental health, physical health and testing servicestargeted to the needs of the PSU student population. SHAC supports the University mission and collaborates with University staff and faculty to support student success.
    6. 6. Espoused Beliefs and Values IIValue: QualityProfessionalServicesValue: Equitableaccess to servicesValue: Importanceof humanrelationshipsValue: Learning
    7. 7. Basic Underlying Assumptions•These are unconscious, taken-for- granted beliefs and values•They determine behavior, perceptions, thoughts
    8. 8. ReferencesSchein, E. H. (2010). Organizational culture and leadership. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

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