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  • 1. CURRICULUM VITAE James Tabery tabery@philosophy.utah.edu jimtabery@gmail.com Office Address Home Address Philosophy Department 1331 East 2100 South University of Utah Salt Lake City, UT 84105 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Tel: 412.657.2796 Tel: 801.581.8362 Fax: 801.585.5195 EMPLOYMENT HISTORY Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of Utah 2007—Present Adjunct Asst. Prof., Div. of Medical Ethics and Humanities, Univ. of Utah 2007—Present EDUCATION University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA PhD, History and Philosophy of Science (2007) Thesis: Causation in the Nature-Nurture Debate: The Case of Genotype-Environment Interaction. Advisors: Paul Griffiths and Sandra Mitchell MA, Interdisciplinary Master of Arts in Bioethics (2007) Thesis: From a Genetic Predisposition to an Interactive Predisposition: Rethinking the Ethical Implications of Gene-Environment Interaction Research. Advisor: Lisa Parker Fairfield University, Fairfield, CT BS, Biology (2000) BA, Philosophy (2000) AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION Philosophy of Science Philosophy of Biology Biomedical Ethics History of Biology AREAS OF COMPETENCE Epistemology Ethics PUBLICATIONS Journal Articles Tabery, James (Forthcoming), “Interactive Predispositions”, Philosophy of Science. Tabery, James (Forthcoming), “Making Sense of the Nature-Nurture Debate (Review of Neven Sesardic, Making Sense of Heritability)”, Biology and Philosophy.
  • 2. Tabery, James and Paul E. Griffiths (Forthcoming), “Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Behavioral Genetics and Developmental Science”, in Kathryn E. Hood, Carolyn Tucker Halpern, Gary Greenberg, and Richard M. Lerner (eds.), Handbook of Developmental Science, Behavior, and Genetics. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. Tabery, James (2009), “From a Genetic Predisposition to an Interactive Predisposition: Rethinking the Ethical Implications of Screening for Gene-Environment Interactions”, Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34(1): 27-48. Tabery, James (2008), “R. A. Fisher, Lancelot Hogben, and the Origin(s) of Genotype- Environment Interaction”, Journal of the History of Biology 41(4): 717-761. Griffiths, Paul E. and James Tabery (2008), “Behavioral Genetics and Development: Historical and Conceptual Causes of Controversy,” New Ideas in Psychology 26(3): 332-352. Tabery, James and Charles W. Mackett (2008), “The Ethics of Triage in the Event of an Influenza Pandemic”, Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness 2: 114-118. Tabery, James (2007), “Biometric and Developmental Gene-Environment Interactions: Looking Back, Moving Forward,” Development and Psychopathology 19: 961-976. Tabery, James (2006), “Looking Back on Lancelot’s Laughter: The Lancelot Thomas Hogben Papers, University of Birmingham, Special Collections,” Mendel Newsletter 15: 10-17. Tabery, James (2004), “Synthesizing Activities and Interactions in the Concept of a Mechanism,” Philosophy of Science 71(1): 1-15. • Awarded 2004 Philosophy of Science Association Graduate Student Essay Prize Tabery, James (2004), “The ‘Evolutionary Synthesis’ of George Udny Yule,” Journal of the History of Biology 37(1): 73-101. Online Publications Darden, Lindley and James Tabery (Spring 2005), “Molecular Biology,” The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Edward N. Zalta (ed.), available online at http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/molecular-biology/. Tabery, James (2001), “Marshall Nirenberg: Transition to Neurobiology, 1965-1969” and “Marshall Nirenberg: Neuroblastoma Research, 1967-1976,” published online as part of the National Institutes of Health’s Profiles in Science digital archive project at http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/. Book Reviews Tabery, James (2007), “Pearson, the Person” (A Review of Karl Pearson: The Scientific Life in a Statistical Age, by Theodore Porter, 2004), Metascience 16(1): 143-146. Tabery, James (2006), “Fueling the (In)Famous Fire” (A Review of Making Sense of Heritability, by Neven Sesardic, 2005), Metascience 15(3): 605-609. Tabery, James and Lisa Parker (2005), “Book Review: Politics in the Laboratory, The Constitution of Human Genetics, by Ira H. Carmen, 2004,” Journal of the American Medical Association 294(11): 1431-1433. Tabery, James (2002), “No Gene Is an Island…” (A Review of The Misunderstood Gene, by Michel Morange, 2001), Metascience 11(2): 227-229. CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS AND INVITED LECTURES Mechanism and Causal-Mechanical Explanation 2
  • 3. “Difference Mechanisms,” University of California—San Diego, San Diego, CA, October 8, 2007. (Invited Lecture) Also presented at: • Biological Explanations of Behavior, Leibniz University, Hannover, Germany, June 14, 2008. • Future Directions in Genetic Studies (ISHPSSB Off-Year Workshop), University of Washington—St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, August 9, 2008. “Causes of Development, Causes of Variation…Causes of Controversy,” Pomona College, Claremont, CA, February 13, 2007. (Job Talk) Also presented at: • Rice University, Houston, TX, January 17, 2007. (Job Talk) “Mechanisms and Mechanism Differences: Between Proximate and Ultimate Biology,” 3rd Queensland Biohumanities Conference, Brisbane, Australia, December 15-17, 2006. (Invited Lecture) “Synthesizing Activities and Interactions in the Concept of a Mechanism,” 4th Athens-Pittsburgh Symposium in the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Delphi, Greece, June 3, 2003. Also presented at: • 5th Annual Pittsburgh-CMU Graduate Conference in Philosophy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, March 15-16, 2003. Genotype-Environment Interaction “Interactive Predispositions,” Philosophy of Science Association biannual meeting, Pittsburgh, PA, 7 November 2008. “From a Genetic Predisposition to an Interactive Predisposition: Rethinking the Ethical Implications of Screening for Gene-Environment Interactions,” University of Nevada— Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, February 8, 2008. (Invited Lecture) “A ‘Genetic Predisposition’ to Violence?: Rethinking the Ethical and Legal Implications of Genetic Research on Antisocial Personality Disorder,” University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, January 22, 2007. (Job Talk) Also presented at: • University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, January 29, 2007. (Job Talk) • Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL, Feb. 1, 2007. (Job Talk) • University at Albany, Albany, NY, February 7, 2007. (Job Talk) “What Is Genotype-Environment Interaction?,” Na-Nu (Nature-Nurture) Symposium, University of Indiana, Bloomington, IN, March 23-25, 2007. (Invited Lecture) “Causes of Variation, Variations on Causation,” Southwest Conference for the History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA, March 31- April 1, 2006. “Genotype-Environment Interaction in the IQ Controversy,” History of Science Society Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, MN, November 3-6, 2005. “R.A. Fisher, Lancelot Hogben, and the Origin(s) of Genotype-Environment Interaction,” British Society for the History of Science Annual Meeting, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, July 15-17 2005. Also presented at: • International Society for the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology Bi- annual Meeting, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, July 13-17, 2005. • Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science Annual Meeting, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, May 29-31, 2005. 3
  • 4. • Beyond Dichotomies, Across Boundaries: Interdisciplinary Investigations of Dynamic Interactions in Biological and Social Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, April 14-17, 2005. “History and Philosophy of Behavioral Genetics,” Program in Psychiatric Genetics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, December 17, 2004. (Invited Lecture) “Critiquing the Analysis of Variance: The Argument from Genotype-Environment Interaction,” EGenIS, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK, September 14, 2004. (Invited Lecture) History of the Evolutionary Synthesis “The ‘Evolutionary Synthesis’ of George Udny Yule,” 46th Midwest JUNTO for the History of Science Conference, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, April 5, 2003. Ethics of Pandemic Influenza Preparation and Response “Pandemic Flu: Lessons from the Past, Preparing for the Future,” Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA, November 27, 2006. (Invited Lecture) “Ethical Considerations in the Event of a Flu Pandemic,” VHA Pennsylvania Physician Leaders Forum, Harrisburg, PA, November 21, 2006. (Invited Lecture) “From Principles to Practice: Implementing an Ethical Health Policy for Pandemic Flu Preparation,” Bioethics and Health Law Grand Rounds, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, September 28, 2006. (Invited Lecture) SUMMARY OF RESEARCH History and Philosophy of Science For the last several years I have focused my philosophical attention on issues revolving around causation and causal-mechanical explanation. Successful explanations in biology generally take the form of elucidated mechanisms. In the past I have investigated and attempted to bring together different theories of mechanism (see my 2004 in Philosophy of Science). More recently, I am attempting to extend the mechanical program so as to capture biological explanations of variation. Lately, I have been exploring the philosophical and historical issues pertaining to research on gene-environment interaction (or G×E). The concept of G×E refers to cases wherein different genetic groups respond differently to the same array of environments. G×E has resided at the heart of the nature-nurture debate since the very origins of the concept. I have been exploring both the history of this research (see my 2007 in Development and Psychopathology, and my 2008 in the Journal of the History of Biology), as well as the philosophical issues concerning causation that this research raises (see my Forthcoming in Philosophy of Science). Biomedical Ethics My historical and philosophical interests in G×E carry over into the bioethical implications of that research. Cases of G×E are being found for a host of complex human traits (e.g. antisocial personality disorder, depression, schizophrenia, and asthma). Most often, cases of G×E are conceptualized as if they reveal a “genetic predisposition” to the trait under investigation. I argue that this concept fundamentally misconstrues this research, and so I have introduced a new concept to accurately capture the results: interactive predisposition (see my Forthcoming in Philosophy of Science). My bioethical interests in this area revolve around how this switch from 4
  • 5. a genetic predisposition to an interactive predisposition reconfigures some of the ongoing debates over genetic screening (see my 2009 in Journal of Medicine and Philosophy). The emergence of avian flu in Southeast Asia in 2004 and the subsequent explosion of the virus out of that region into Africa and Europe has renewed fears of a possible influenza pandemic on the order of the Great Pandemic of 1918. There are a host of ethical issues raised by the preparation for and response to this threat. My interests are at the local/institutional level (see my 2008 in Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness): How will hospitals triage (or sort) patients during a pandemic to decide who gets what level of treatment? What criteria will guide this process of sorting? Are healthcare workers obligated to work in this environment? What are the obligations of hospital administration to prepare for such a threat? FELLOWSHIPS AND AWARDS Philosophy of Science Association Graduate Student Essay Prize for “Synthesizing Activities and Interactions in the Concept of a Mechanism,” 2004 Andrew W. Mellon Dissertation Research Fellowship, 2004-2005 National Science Foundation Travel Grant, Fall 2005 University of Pittsburgh Arts and Sciences Graduate Student Organization Travel Grant, Summer 2005 University of Pittsburgh Graduate and Professional Student Association Travel Grant, Summer 2005 National Science Foundation Travel Grant, Fall 2006 TEACHING EXPERIENCE University of Utah Bioethics, Spring 2008, Fall 2008 Science and Society, Fall 2007, Spring 2009 Topics in the Philosophy of Science: Genetics, Fall 2007 University of Pittsburgh Ethics, Law, and Professionalism [Biomedical Ethics for Medical Students], Fall 2006 The Development of Modern Biology [History and Philosophy of Biology], Spring 2003 Problem Solving [Intro. to Scientific Reasoning], Sm 2006, Sp 2006, Fl 2005, Fl 2001 Morality and Medicine [Biomedical Ethics], Summer 2005, Summer 2004, Spring 2002 Myth and Science [Ancient Philosophy], Spring 2004, Fall 2003, Fall 2002 Principles of Scientific Reasoning [Intro. to Logic], Fall 2003 Magic, Medicine, and Science [Modern Philosophy/Science], Summer 2002 Pennsylvania Governor’s School for the Sciences, Pittsburgh, PA Ethical Considerations in the Event of a Flu Pandemic, Summer 2006 Medicine and Its Moral Consequences [Biomedical Ethics], Summer 2003-Summer 2005 SERVICE Philosophical Community Referee, British Journal for the Philosophy of Science Referee, Philosophy of Science 5
  • 6. Referee, Erkenntnis Referee, International Studies in the Philosophy of Science Referee, Biology and Philosophy Referee, Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Referee, National Science Foundation Co-Organizer, 6th Annual CMU-Pittsburgh International Graduate Philosophy Conference, 2004 University of Utah Committee Member, Graduate Committee, Department of Philosophy (2007-Present) Director, Job Placement, Department of Philosophy (2007-Present) University of Pittsburgh Ethicist, Avian Flu Task Force (for University of Pittsburgh Medical Center), 2006-2007 Graduate Assistant, NEH Summer Institute: Science and Values, 2003 Representative, Arts & Sciences Graduate Student Organization, 2002-2005 Co-Organizer, University of Pittsburgh Grad-Expo, 2003 Referee, 4th Annual CMU-Pittsburgh Graduate Philosophy Conference, 2002 University of Pittsburgh (Teaching) Mentor, Teaching Assistants/Teaching Fellows in the Dept. of History and Philosophy of Science, 2005-2006 Committee Member, Elizabeth Baranger Excellence in Graduate Teaching Award, 2005 Instructor, New Teaching Assistant Orientation, 2002-2003 PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS American Philosophical Association American Society for Bioethics and Humanities Behavior Genetics Association History of Science Society International Society for the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Biology Philosophy of Science Association 6