TRMD Graduate Program Handbook.doc

  • 998 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
998
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Tropical Medicine Graduate Program Graduate Student Handbook Revised July, 2008 Department of Tropical Medicine, Medical Microbiology & Pharmacology John A. Burns School of Medicine University of Hawai`i at Manoa 651 Ilalo Street Honolulu, HI 96813 Phone (808) 692-1600 Fax (808) 692-1979 1
  • 2. Revised July, 2008 Table of Contents Description of Department, Graduate Program & Faculty . 3 Student Learning Outcomes 5 Student Assessment 6 Required and Recommended Courses 10 Graduate Program Requirements 12 Academic Policies 16 Tropical Medicine Course Descriptions 16 Useful Links 19 UH Manoa Campus Map 20 2
  • 3. Revised July, 2008 Map to John A. Burns School of Medicine (Kaka`ako Campus) 22 Graduate Faculty Description & Contact Information 23 3
  • 4. Revised July, 2008 Description of the Department, Graduate Program & Faculty Tropical Medicine is the study of diseases that occur more commonly in the tropical regions of the world. However, in today’s era of globalization and modern transportation, diseases that were once confined to the tropics have spread geographically and now play a significant role in the 20th century global resurgence of infectious diseases. As such, research in the area of tropical medicine and medical microbiology has greatly increased in importance in the past 20 years. The Department of Tropical Medicine, Medical Microbiology, and Pharmacology, at the John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) offers graduate programs leading to the MS and PhD in Biomedical Sciences (Tropical Medicine). A major goal of the department is to provide Asian and Pacific countries the expertise needed to conduct tropical infectious diseases research. Tropical medicine faculty conduct studies on infectious organisms and the diseases they cause, including dengue, West Nile, AIDS, hepatitis, viral and bacterial encephalitis, malaria, tuberculosis and Kawasaki disease. The faculty employs a multidisciplinary approach, including immunology, pathogenesis, epidemiology, pharmacology, diagnosis, prevention, control, treatment, socio-ecological systems, human ecology, microbial and vector ecology, environmental change, and participatory action research to answer fundamental questions associated with the transmission dynamics and pathogenesis of these diseases. These studies can be laboratory-based, field-based, clinic-based, or include a combination of all three. The field of tropical medicine requires knowledge of virology, bacteriology, parasitology, entomology, immunology, cell and molecular biology, epidemiology, ecology, behavioral science and clinical medicine. In this respect, the tropical medicine program at UHM provides learning opportunities in a range of biological disciplines available in few other university departments. Students also receive vigorous training in scientific methodology. The department has active research programs with several community hospitals and collaborates closely with the State of Hawai`i Department of Health, providing instruction and expertise in bioterrorism preparedness and diagnosis of infectious diseases using the latest technology. In addition to local collaborations, department faculty have partnered with several international institutions in Southeast Asia and Africa specializing in infectious disease research. Faculty *Graduate Faculty *D. J. Gubler, ScD (Chair)—arboviruses and vector-borne disease, epidemiology and control *S. N. Bennett, PhD—molecular evolution and epidemiology of emerging infectious 4
  • 5. Revised July, 2008 diseases *S. P. Chang, PhD—immunology, molecular biology, malaria vaccine development A. Collier, PhD – pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, reproductive pharmacology C. B. Cropp, MS—arbovirology *A. R. Diwan, PhD—medical virology, chemotherapy, vaccines (retired) *E. Furusawa, MD, PhD—viral chemotherapy (retired) L. Gollin, PhD—medical anthropology and ethnobotany *W. L. Gosnell, PhD—host parasite interactions, malaria, immunology *G. S. N. Hui, PhD—parasitology, immunology, cell biology P. H. Kaufusi - pathogenesis of West Nile virus *K. J. Kramer, PhD—parasitology, epidemiology, leptospirosis, HIV serodiagnosis H. Luo, PhD – pathogenesis of arboviruses and polyomaviruses *F. D. Miller, PhD—epidemiology of infectious diseases *V. R. Nerurkar, PhD—pathogenesis of infectious diseases, delineating cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying microbe-host interaction *D. W. Taylor, Ph.D. - malaria immunology, maternal and child health *S. Verma, PhD—molecular, biochemical aspects of viral diseases G. Watt, MD—zoonotic infectious diseases *B. A. Wilcox, PhD—ecology of infectious diseases, integrative health research, community medicine *S. Verma, PhD—diagnosis of Kawasaki syndrome, effect of selenium deficiency on RNA virus mutations *K. Yamaga, PhD—immunological mechanisms of diseases Cooperating Graduate Faculty J. M. Berestecky, PhD—enteric bacteria G. Erdem, MD—molecular epidemiology of group A streptococcal and staphylococcal infections; complications of strep infections like acute rheumatic fever A. Imrie, PhD—cytotoxic T-cells & HIV J. H. Kim, MD—HIV viral neutralization, cytokine gene therapy in HIV specific T-cells, HTLV-I and-II mechanisms of Rex protein function S. R. Kim, PhD—basic immunology of HIV-1 infection Y. Lu, PhD – gene transfer and gene therapy in HIV-infection, diagnostic virology M. E. Melish, MD—staphylococcal infection and toxins, clinical infectious disease, Kawasaki syndrome F. D. Pien, MD—clinical microbiology, diagnostic bacteriology and parasitology, efficacy of antimicrobial agents R. C. Rudoy, MD—clinical aspects of viral and bacterial diseases B. Shiramizu, MD—pathobiology of HIV-associated disorders E. K. Tam, MD—inflammation, immunologic mechanisms of pulmonary diseases, genetic and environmental determinants of asthma R. Yanagihara, MD—emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases Q. Yu, MD,PhD – HIV-1 vaccines and memory CTL responses 5
  • 6. Revised July, 2008 Affiliate Graduate Faculty F. Mercier, PhD – neurovirology C. F. T. Uyehara, PhD—developmental and cardiovascular pharmacology Administrative Staff Sheila Kawamoto, Administrative & Fiscal Support Specialist Karen Amii, Clerk Stenographer Tropical Medicine Graduate Program Student Learning Outcomes A. Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences (Tropical Medicine) 1. Demonstrate a fundamental knowledge base in the major subdisciples of the field of Tropical Medicine: bacteriology, virology, mycology, parasitology, immunology, molecular epidemiology, and infectious disease ecology. 2. Demonstrate a mastery of technical and experimental methodologies required to conduct research in the field of Tropical Medicine. 3. Demonstrate the ability to plan, execute, interpret, and evaluate experimental studies in Tropical Medicine. 4. Demonstrate skills required for instruction, assessment and mentoring of undergraduate and MS level students. 5. Demonstrate proficiency in written and verbal communication skills in classroom lectures and other teaching formats and in professional seminars and presentations. 6. Demonstrate sufficient mastery and scientific maturity to assess the work of peers in related fields. B. Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences (Tropical Medicine) 1.Demonstrate an advanced knowledge base in the major subdisciples of the field of Tropical Medicine: bacteriology, virology, mycology, parasitology, immunology, molecular epidemiology, and infectious disease ecology. 2.Demonstrate a mastery of technical and experimental methodologies required to conduct research in the field of Tropical Medicine. 6
  • 7. Revised July, 2008 3.Demonstrate the ability to plan, execute, interpret, and evaluate experimental studies in Tropical Medicine. 4.Demonstrate skills for instruction, assessment and mentoring of undergraduate, MS and PhD level students. 5.Demonstrate skills to verbally communicate scientific concepts and results in classroom lectures and other teaching formats and in professional seminars and presentations. 6.Demonstrate written communication skills as required in various professional duties including manuscript preparation for scientific publication, preparation of research grant applications, preparation of lecture notes, development of introductory and advanced courses in related disciplines. 7.Demonstrate sufficient mastery and scientific maturity to assess the work of peers in related fields. 8.Develop administrative skills to manage a research laboratory, supervise technical and professional staff, and assume responsibilities and provide leadership as a faculty member. Tropical Medicine Graduate Program Student Assessment A. Master of Science Degree 1. Course evaluations a. Core courses: written examinations at regular intervals (midterm exams) as well as a final examination at the end of the course b. Advanced courses: written exams may be substituted by term papers or oral presentations on a subject selected by student and the faculty instructor c. Course examinations, papers and presentations are evaluated by the faculty instructor 2. Diagnostic evaluation a. First or second semester of residence b. Written exam to evaluate background in infectious disease microbiology & immunology c. Used to advise on course of study 3. Master's Plan A (Thesis) a. Thesis proposal is evaluated and subject to approval by thesis advisory committee b. General (Qualifying) Examination 7
  • 8. Revised July, 2008 − A general examination (written and oral) will be required before a student is advanced to candidacy for a Master of Science degree. − The examination will be given during the third or fourth semester of residence. The questions will be composed by the graduate faculty and will be designed to adequately test the student's basic knowledge of the fields of biomedical sciences and Tropical Medicine. − The results of the oral/written examination will be used to evaluate the student's progress and to advise him/her on a course of study to correct any weakness. − A student who passes the examination may be recommended for advancement to candidacy for the master's degree. − A student who fails the general examination may repeat it once within six months following the date of the first examination. The exact time of examination will be determined by mutual agreement between the student and examination committee. − The student will not be considered for candidacy again should he/she fail the general examination a second time. c. Final Examination − A final oral examination, covering the thesis and related areas, is required. It will be held at least three weeks before the end of the term during which the degree is conferred. − The student will be expected to present the work covered in his/her thesis, giving the purpose, methodology, results, and meaning of the work in a clear, orderly manner. − He/she will be expected to discuss questions regarding the thesis and demonstrate a sufficient background in related areas. − The final examination will be conducted by the thesis committee and may be open to all graduate faculty − Should the student fail the final examination, he/she may repeat it only once at the discretion of the thesis committee. − A student who fails the examination a second time is dismissed from the program. 4. Master's Plan B (Non-thesis) a. Research project proposal is evaluated and subject to approval by the advisory committee. b. General (Qualifying) Examinatiom 8
  • 9. Revised July, 2008 − A general examination (oral or written) will be required before a student is advanced to candidacy for a Master of Science degree. − The examination will be given during the third semester of residence. − The questions will be composed by the graduate faculty and will be designed to adequately test the student's general knowledge of the biomedical sciences and Tropical Medicine. − The results of the oral examination will be used to evaluate the student's progress and to advise him/her on a course of study to correct any weakness. − A student who passes the examination may be recommended for advancement to candidacy for the master's degree. − A student who fails the general examination may repeat it once within six months following the date of the first examination. The exact time of examination within that six months may vary and will be determined by mutual agreement between the student and examination committee. − A student who fails the examination a second time is dismissed from the program. c. Final Examination − A comprehensive written and oral examination is required and will be conducted by the candidate's advisory committee. − The final examination will be given at least three weeks before the end of the term during which the degree is conferred. − The student will be required to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the various fields encompassed by Tropical Medicine. − Should the student fail the final examination, he/she may be permitted to repeat it only once at the discretion of his/her advisory committee. − A student who fails the examination a second time is irrevocably dropped from the program. B. Ph.D. Degree 1. General diagnostic examination a. conducted by an advisory committee representative of the general field of infectious diseases before the end of the first semester 9
  • 10. Revised July, 2008 b. evaluates the student's general knowledge of the field of tropical medicine and used to outline a course of study to correct any deficiencies. 2. Qualifying Examination a. Usually administered after the first year of study b. Examination Committee consists of graduate faculty representative of the general field of infectious diseases and will prepare and evaluate the results of the exam. c. Examination committee determines whether the student has passed or failed the exam, note any academic weaknesses and recommend an appropriate course of study. d. The qualifying exam may be repeated once e. This examination is also used to determine whether to encourage a student to proceed in a doctoral program or end with a terminal MS degree. 3. Comprehensive Examination a. The Tropical Medicine PhD Comprehensive Examination will consist of the preparation and defense of a research proposal based on the student’s dissertation research project. b. This examination should be administered by the end of the second year of PhD training by members of the student’s dissertation committee. c. The exact format of the proposal is to be specified by the dissertation committee; however it should generally follow the format of a grant proposal to a major funding agency such as the National Institutes of Health or the National Science Foundation. d. The proposal should be prepared in consultation with the student’s research advisor but should include at least one innovative objective that is not included as part of an existing grant or a proposal developed by the advisor. e. An oral examination based on the written proposal will be carried out by the dissertation committee. The content of this oral examination may include fundamental concepts underlying the hypotheses addressed in the proposal, technical or experimental design issues, and any other topics which the committee feels are pertinent to the student’s understanding of his/her research area. f. A majority of the committee must vote to pass the student in order for student to pass the exam. g. The exam may be repeated once. h. Failure to pass the comprehensive exam after two attempts will result in dismissal from the graduate program. 4. Final Examination and Dissertation Defense 10
  • 11. Revised July, 2008 a. Administered upon completion of the dissertation research in the form of a seminar presentation, defense and oral examination b. The examination and dissertation committee will consist of faculty within the graduate program with expertise in the various programmatic disciplines as well as an external member representing the UHM academic community at large c. Committee evaluation is based on the following criteria: i. Student’s proficiency in the area of specialization within the field of Tropical Medicine as commensurate with the expectations of the specific degree ii. Whether or not the student has produced a body of work which is on par with program expectations for the specific degree iii. Whether or not the student has effectively communicated and defended this body of work d. A majority of the committee must vote to pass the student in order for student to pass the exam. e. The exam may be repeated once. f. Failure to pass the final examination after two attempts will result in dismissal from the graduate program. Required and Recommended Courses The required and/or recommended courses are divided into three groups. GROUP I - Core Courses: All students are required to have a background of undergraduate courses in medical microbiology, organic chemistry and biochemistry, physics, and mathematics. An introductory course in Immunology (e.g. MICR 461) will be required of students who do not have an adequate background in immunology. All students are required to take: TRMD 604 Infectious Disease Micro I TRMD 605 Infectious Disease Micro II TRMD 606 Tropical Medicine Research Rotations CMB 621 Molecular Biology of Cell I (MS and PhD) CMB 622 Molecular Biology of Cell II (PhD only) CMB 626 or Research Ethics MICR 614 TRMD 690 Tropical Medicine Seminar (each semester) 11
  • 12. Revised July, 2008 GROUP II - Tropical Medicine elective courses to be selected by the student and his/her graduate committee according to the student's interests and needs. TRMD 607 Neurovirology TRMD 609 Advances in Medical Immunology TRMD 650 Advanced Ecology of Infectious Diseases TRMD 652 Advanced Genetics & Evolution of Infectious Diseases TRMD 653 Bioinformatics for Infectious Diseases TRMD 671 Advanced Medical Parasitology TRMD 672 Advanced Medical Virology TRMD 673 Advanced Medical Bacteriology TRMD 695 Plan B Master’s Project TRMD 699 Directed Reading/Research TRMD 700 Thesis Research TRMD 705 Special Topics in Tropical Medicine TRMD 800 Dissertation Research GROUP III - Courses available in related fields: Elective courses available in related fields of study include: Asian Studies 600 Asian Studies Seminar Biochemistry 441 Basic Biochemistry 643 Bioenergetics & Carbohydrates 644 Metabolic Biochemistry Cell & Molecular Biology 625 Advanced Topics in Genetics 680 Molecular Genetics 650 Population Genetics 654 Genetics Seminar 671 Techniques in Genetics Entomology* 486 Insect-Microbe Interactions 661 Medical and Veterinary Entomology 671 Insect Ecology 675 Biological Control of Pests 686 Insect Transmission of Plant Pathogens *Plant & Environmental Protection Sciences Geography 410 Human Role in Environmental Change 12
  • 13. Revised July, 2008 411 Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change 488 Geographic Information Systems 654 Seminar in Geography of S.E. Asia 665 Seminar in Geography of the Pacific Interdisciplinary Studies 650 Principles of Applied Evolutionary Ecology 651L Laboratory in Applied Evolutionary Ecology Microbiology 461 Immunology 463 Microbiology of Pathogens 470 Microbial Pathogenesis 490 Animal Virology 625 Advanced Immunology 630 Microbial Genome 632 Advanced Microbial Physiology 655 Advanced Virology 661 Bioinformatics & Comparative Genomics 680 Advances in Microbial Ecology 681 Host-Parasite Relationships 685 Molecular and Cellular Bacterial Pathogenesis Pharmacology 601 General Pharmacology 602 Systematic Pharmacology Public Health 655 Biostatistics I 656 Biostatistics II 658 Computer Applications in Public Health 661 Epidemiological Study Design Critique 663 Principles of Epidemiology I 664 Principles of Epidemiology II 666 Seminar in Infectious Disease Control Zoology 621 Evolutionary Ecology 631 Biometry 632 Advanced Biometry 652 Population Biology 690 Conservation Biology 13
  • 14. Revised July, 2008 Tropical Medicine Graduate Program Requirements Master’s Plan A (Thesis) 1) Preliminary Conference with graduate program chair • appointment of interim advisor • diagnostic evaluation with entire faculty • Complete relevant sections of Pre-Candidacy Progress Form I − Preliminary Conference − Transfer of credits (if applicable) − Identification and remediation plan for deficiencies (if applicable) 2) General (Qualifying) Examination • second semester of residence • written/oral exam with questions composed by advisory committee (3 members: advisor + 2 other T3M faculty) • test general knowledge of biomedical sciences • used to evaluate, advise on course of study to correct weaknesses • may be repeated once • pass: advancement to candidacy • Completion and submission of Pre-Candidacy Progress Form I to Graduate Division 3) Coursework requirements • 30 credit hours − 18 hrs approved course work excluding 699 and thesis 700 − at least 12 hrs in courses numbered 600-798 − participation in TM690, Journal Club (TM699-1 cr) every semester − registration in thesis 700 during last semester; at least 9 cr. hrs of thesis 700 4) Master’s Thesis Committee • Selection of permanent advisor by end of first year (chair of thesis committee) • Appointment of two other members of T3M faculty to committee 5) Thesis proposal • Submission of research topic and thesis proposal to committee by end of third semester − Thesis proposal should be presented as a departmental seminar • Approval of thesis topic by committee • Obtain certification, approvals and guidance as needed: − Committee on Human Studies www.hawaii.edu/irb/; 539-3955 − Environmental Health & Safety Office www.hawaii.edu/ehso/; 956-8660 − Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee www.hawaii.edu/ansc/IACUC/; 956-4446 14
  • 15. Revised July, 2008 • Advancement to thesis stage • Submission of Advance to Candidacy Form II to Graduate Division (must be submitted prior to registering for Thesis 700) 6) Final Examination • Research seminar and oral examination covering thesis research and related areas • Conducted by thesis committee; open to all graduate faculty 7) Judgement of Thesis • Evaluation of final oral exam and written thesis by thesis committee • Submission of Master’s Thesis Evaluation Form III to Graduate Division Master’s Plan B (Non-thesis) 1) Preliminary Conference with graduate program chair • appointment of interim advisor • diagnostic evaluation with entire faculty • Complete relevant sections of Pre-Candidacy Progress Form I − Preliminary Conference − Transfer of credits (if applicable) − Identification and remediation plan for deficiencies (if applicable) 2) General (Qualifying) Examination • second semester of residence • questions composed by advisory committee • test general knowledge of biomedical sciences • used to evaluate, advise on course of study to correct weaknesses • may be repeated once • pass: advancement to candidacy • Completion and internal filing of Pre-Candidacy Progress Form I 3) Coursework requirements • 30 credit hours − 18 hrs approved course work excluding 699 and thesis 700 − at least 18 hrs in courses numbered 600-798 − participation in seminar (TM690), Journal Club (TM699-1 cr) every semester − at least 1 semester 699 research but no more than 9 cr of TM699 4) Master’s Committee • permanent advisor; selected by end of first year • two other members of T3M faculty 5) Study Program and Research Project proposal • meet with committee to decide on study program before end of second semester − additional courses − research project proposal • Obtain certification, approvals and guidance as needed: 15
  • 16. Revised July, 2008 − Committee on Human Studies www.hawaii.edu/irb/; 539-3955 − Environmental Health & Safety Office www.hawaii.edu/ehso/; 956-8660 − Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee www.hawaii.edu/ansc/IACUC/; 956-4446 • Completion and internal filing of modified Advance to Candidacy Form II 6) Final examination • Comprehensive written and oral examination; demonstrate basic knowledge of the various fields encompassed by Tropical Medicine • To be conducted by candidate’s advisory committee • To be given at least three weeks before the end of the term in which the degree is conferred • Presentation of research seminar and written paper covering research project • Completion and internal filing of modified Progress Report Form III Doctor of Philosophy 1) Preliminary Conference with graduate program chair • appointment of interim advisor • remedy all undergraduate deficiencies • completion of relevant sections of Pre-Candidacy Progress Form I 2) General (Qualifying) Examination • end of second semester of residence • written exam, approx. 3-4 hours covering tropical medicine & medical microbiology, molecular and cell biology • questions composed by examination committee appointed by graduate program chair; should be more detailed, challenging than MS general exam • determine whether to encourage student to proceed to Ph.D. • used to evaluate, advise on course of study to correct weaknesses • pass: advancement to candidacy, submission of Pre-Candidacy Progress Form I to Graduate Division 3) Coursework requirements • No specific course credit requirements except that candidates who have not had equivalent courses should take the core courses: TRMD 605 and 606, and CMB 621 and 622 in order to pass the qualifying examination and a Research Ethics course • Candidates will be required to enroll in courses which, in the opinion of their advisors, are essential for a comprehensive background in Tropical Medicine and to prepare them for a research career 16
  • 17. Revised July, 2008 • Candidates must gain teaching experience by assisting in one course for two or more semesters 4) Doctoral Committee • 4 members of graduate faculty representing various infectious disease subdisciplines, and • 1 outside member: one faculty from another field of study and from outside department’s graduate faculty • selected after candidate passes general exam & admitted to candidacy • meeting of student with doctoral committee at least once per semester to assess progress 5) Dissertation • independent research, original contribution to Tropical Medicine • preparation, approval, etc. to follow Graduate Division guidelines • approval of research topic by committee before end of third semester 6) Comprehensive Examination • preparation and defense of a written research proposal in grant proposal format • conducted by student’s doctoral committee • tests broad knowledge and basic understanding of Tropical Medicine and chosen minor fields; also evaluates ability to use knowledge to develop a research plan and solve problems in a logical manner • pass: advancement to candidacy for Ph.D. degree • submission of Advance to Candidacy Form II to Graduate Division • Helpful resources for preparation of research proposal NIH: http://deainfo.nci.nih.gov/extra/extdocs/gntapp.htm NIH: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/ncn/grants/app/default.htm NIH: http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sandrac/TRMD_Comprehensive_Exam_Propo sal_Guidelines.doc https://laulima.hawaii.edu/access/content/user/sandrac/TRMD %20Comprehensive%20Exam%20Proposal%20Guidelines.doc NSF: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~sfinger/advice/advice.html General: http://www.learnerassociates.net/proposal/ 7) Final Examination • defense of the research dissertation, related subjects • conducted by student’s doctoral committee • taken at least 6 wks before end of semester in which degree granted 8) Judgement of Dissertation • review of written dissertation by doctoral committee • submission of Dissertation Evaluation Form III to Graduate Division MS/PhD Student Progress Forms: I. Preliminary Conference, General/Qualifying Exam, Pre-Candidacy Progress 17
  • 18. Revised July, 2008 II. Formation of Master’s Committee/Dissertation Committee, Approval of Thesis/ Dissertation Topic, Results of Comprehensive Exam (PhD only), Advancement to Candidacy III. Final Oral Examination/Defense of Thesis/Dissertation, Judgment of Thesis/Dissertation Academic Policies Undergraduate and graduate students in the School of Medicine must adhere to the academic policies of UH Manoa. A summary description of these policies may be found in the online catalog: http://www.catalog.hawaii.edu/about-uh/campus- policies/campus-policies.htm. Tropical Medicine and Medical Microbiology (TRMD) Course Descriptions TRMD 499 Reading and Research (V) Directed reading and research in laboratory; diagnostic aspects of bacterial, parasitic, and viral infections. Pre: consent. TRMD 500 Master’s Plan B/C Studies (1) Enrollment for degree completion. Pre: master’s Plan B or C candidate and consent. TRMD 512 Unit II Concurrent Elective (1) Elective course for first-year medical students. CR/NC only. Pre: BIOM 551 and consent. TRMD 513 Unit III Concurrent Elective (1) Elective course for first-year medical students. CR/NC only. Pre: BIOM 551 and consent. TRMD 514 Unit IV Concurrent Elective (1) Elective course for second-year medical students. CR/NC only. Pre: BIOM 551 and consent. TRMD 515 Unit V Concurrent Elective (1) Elective course for second-year medical students. CR/NC only. Pre: BIOM 551 and consent. TRMD 525 Unit V Block Elective (1) Required elective for second-year medical students; objectives to be determined by contract. One option is a review of USMLE step. CR/NC only. Pre: BIOM 551. TRMD 545 Topics in Tropical Medicine (V) Elective for fourth-year medical students for advanced study of selected topics within the field of tropical medicine and medical microbiology. Pre: fourth-year standing. 18
  • 19. Revised July, 2008 TRMD 595 (Alpha) Selected Topics in Infectious Diseases (1) Elective for medical students; (B) infectious diseases; (C) parasitology; (D) epidemiology; (E) immunology. MD majors only. CR/NC only. Pre: MDED 554 or consent. Fall only. TRMD 599 (Alpha) Selected Research Topics in Infectious Diseases (1) Research elective for medical students; (B) infectious diseases; (C) parasitology; (D) epidemiology; (E) immunology. MD majors only. CR/NC only. Pre: MDED 554 or consent. Fall only. TRMD 604 Infectious Disease Micro I (3) Pathogenesis, epidemiology, immunobiology of infectious diseases caused by bacterial and fungal pathogens; principles of host- pathogen interactions; public health aspects of infectious diseases. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: MICR 351 or consent. (Cross-listed as PH 665) TRMD 605 Infectious Disease Micro II (3) Pathogenesis, epidemiology, immunobiology of infectious diseases caused by viruses and parasites; principles of host-pathogen interactions; public health aspects of infectious diseases. Repeatable one time. A-F only. Pre: MICR 351 and TRMD 604; or consent. (Cross-listed as PH 667) TRMD 606 Tropical Medicine Laboratory Rotations (V) Practical experience in use of equipment and procedures in infectious disease and immunology research; introduction to research in tropical medicine. Repeatable unlimited times. Pre: 604 (or concurrent), or consent. (Cross-listed as PH 668) TRMD 607 Neurovirology (1) Seminar course on neuroinvasive viruses giving basics of viruses causing nervous system diseases and discussing recent advances in the research field of neurovirology. Pre: MICR 351 or equivalent; or consent. Fall only. TRMD 609 Advances In Medical Immunology (3) Presentations/discussions of current literature concerning recent advances in immunology relevant to disease and to disease processes. Pre: consent. (Alt. years: spring) TRMD 650 Advanced Epidemiological Ecology of Infectious Diseases (2) Applications of population biology, pathogen/host life history, and population genetics to infectious disease epidemiology, including micro- and macroparasites, and implications to disease control and prevention of strategies. A-F only. Pre: 604 (or concurrent) and 605 (or concurrent), or consent. (Alt. years: spring) 19
  • 20. Revised July, 2008 TRMD 652 Advanced Genetics and Evolution of Infectious Diseases (2) An evolutionary perspective to examine the interactive responses between infectious agents and the immune system. Topics will include natural selection, life history evolution, population genetics of pathogens and hosts, and anti-microbial resistance. A-F only. Pre: 604 (or concurrent) and 605 (or concurrent), or consent. (Alt. years: spring) TRMD 653 Bioinformatics for Infectious Diseases (1) Combined lecture/computer lab course on bioinformatic tools used in genomics, including sequence assembly, search algorithms, alignment, phylogenetics, and molecular evolution/epidemiology. Focus will be on infectious disease examples. Open to nonmajors. A-F only. Pre: 604 (or concurrent) and 605 (or concurrent) or consent. Fall only. TRMD 671 Advanced Medical Parasitology (2) Consideration of ultrastructure, physiology, biochemistry, in-vitro cultivation and host-parasite relationship of parasites of medical importance. A-F only. Pre: consent. (Alt. years: fall) TRMD 672 Advanced Medical Virology (2) In-depth study of the major groups of viruses pathogenic for human; virus replication, host range, pathogenesis, immunology, and epidemiology. Pre: 605 or equivalent, or consent. (Alt. years: fall) TRMD 673 Advanced Medical Bacteriology (2) Role of bacteria in infectious diseases, with emphasis on clinical aspects and identification of etiological agents. Pre: 605 or equivalent, or consent. TRMD 690 Seminar in Tropical Medicine and Public Health (1) Weekly discussion and reports on current advances in tropical medicine and public health. (Cross-listed as PH 755) TRMD 695 Plan B Master’s Project (3) Independent study for students working on a Plan B Master’s project. A grade of Satisfactory (S) is assigned when the project is satisfactorily completed. Pre: graduate standing in TRMD. TRMD 699 Directed Research (V) Directed research in medical microbiology (bacteriology, parasitology, virology). Pre: consent. TRMD 700 Thesis Research (V) Research for master’s thesis. Approval of department faculty required. TRMD 705 Special Topics in Tropical Medicine (1) Advanced instruction in frontiers of tropical medicine and public health. Repeatable. (Cross-listed as PH 756) 20
  • 21. Revised July, 2008 TRMD 800 Dissertation Research (V) Research for doctoral thesis. Approval of department faculty is required. Useful Links Asia-Pacific Institute of Tropical Medicine & Infectious Diseases: http://apitmid.hawaii.edu/ Graduate Division: http://www.hawaii.edu/graduate/ Graduate Division forms and manuals: http://www.hawaii.edu/graduate/download/list.htm#master UH Manoa online catalog: http://www.catalog.hawaii.edu/ Get a UH username: https://sunsys.its.hawaii.edu/acctmgmt/ Course Registration: http://www.hawaii.edu/myuh/manoa/ International Student Services: http://www.hawaii.edu/issmanoa/ Graduate Student Organization: http://gso.hawaii.edu/ JABSOM: http://jabsom.hawaii.edu/jabsom/ JABSOM Health Sciences library: http://www.hawaii.edu/hslib JABSOM 2004-2005 Bulletin (catalog): http://hawaiimed.hawaii.edu/medical_ed/0405bltn.pdf 21
  • 22. Revised July, 2008 Map to John A. Burns School of Medicine, Kaka’ako campus 651 Ilalo St., Honolulu, HI 96813 http://jabsom.hawaii.edu/jabsom/about/map.php 22
  • 23. UH Manoa Campus Map 23
  • 24. Revised July, 2008 24
  • 25. GRADUATE FACULTY IN THE DEPARTMENT OF TROPICAL MEDICINE Name Rank and Department Research Interests Shannon N. Bennett, Ph.D. (Univ. of British Assistant Professor Dengue virus molecular epidemiology and evolution, parasitic Colombia, Canada), sbennett@hawaii.edu Tropical Medicine nematodes of marine fishes Malaria immunity & vaccine development, biomarkers of severe Sandra Perreira Chang, Ph.D. (Oregon Health Professor dengue virus infection, immunology of latent M. tuberculosis Sciences University), sandrac@hawaii.edu Tropical Medicine infection, molecular biology of M. tuberculosis drug resistance Abbie Collier, Ph.D. (Univ. of Auckland Medical Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, molecular studies of Assistant Professor School), acollier@hawaii.edu drug metabolism, reproductive pharmacology and teratogenesis Pharmacology Arwind R. Diwan, Ph.D. (Univ. of London, Professor Chemotherapy of viral diseases; viral vaccines; oncogenic School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine), Tropical Medicine (retired) viruses; slow virus infections; hepatitis; AIDS arwind@hawaii.edu Eiichi Furusawa, M.D., Ph.D. (Osaka, Japan), Professor Pharmacology of natural products, viral and cancer 956-3168 Pharmacology (retired) chemotherapy William L. Gosnell, Ph.D. (Univ. of Hawaii), Junior Researcher Host parasite interactions, malaria, TB immunology gosnell@hawaii.edu Tropical Medicine Duane Gubler, ScD. (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Professor & Chairperson Vector-borne diseases including dengue and West Nile virus School of Public Health) dgubler@hawaii.edu Tropical Medicine George S.N. Hui, Ph.D. (Univ. of Hawaii), Researcher Immunology of parasitic infections, immunomodulators for ghui@hawaii.edu Tropical Medicine parasite vaccines, cell biology of protozoan parasites Kenton J. Kramer, Ph.D. (Univ. of Hawaii), Associate Professor Parasitic diseases of the Pacific; amebic infections in Hawaii; Kramer@hawaii.edu Tropical Medicine Community Medicine Program for Health Promotion; epidemiologic/immunologic methods of malaria control F. DeWolfe Miller, Ph.D. (Univ. of Michigan), Professor Infectious disease epidemiology dewolfe@hawaii.edu Tropical Medicine Vivek R. Nerurkar, Ph.D. (Univ. of Bombay, Professor Pathogenesis of infectious diseases; cellular & molecular India), nerurkar@hawaii.edu Tropical Medicine mechanisms underlying microbe-host interaction. 25
  • 26. Revised July, 2008 Leslie Q. Tam, Ph.D. (Univ. of Hawaii), Professor, Tropical Medicine P. falciparum merozoite surface & rhoptry antigens; bacterial cell taml@hawaii.edu (emeritus) wall adjuvants Diane Wallace Taylor, Ph.D. (University of Adjunct Professor Maternal and neonatal immunity to malaria Hawaii), taylordw@georgetown.edu Tropical Medicine Saguna Verma, Ph.D. (Devi Ahilya University, Assistant Researcher Diagnosis of Kawasaki syndrome, effect of selenium deficiency India), saguna@pbrc.hawaii.edu Tropical Medicine on RNA virus mutations, Professor Population biology; human-ecosystem interaction; ecological Bruce Wilcox, Ph.D. (Univ. of California San Tropical Medicine and Diego), bwilcox@hawaii.edu human health linkages Karen M. Yamaga, Ph.D. (Univ. of Hawaii), Professor Immunological mechanisms of diseases; pathogenesis of yamaga@hawaii.edu Tropical Medicine rheumatoid arthritis COOPERATING GRADUATE FACULTY John Berestecky, Ph.D. (Univ. of Hawaii), Associate Professor Epidemiology & pathogenesis of Campylobacter enteritis, johnb@hawaii.edu Kapiolani Community immune response of Hawaiian Green Turtles, identification of College plant pathogens using monoclonal antibodies Mona Bomgaars, MD Hansen’s Disease Branch Hansen’s disease and international health mbomgaars@hawaii.rr.com State Dept. of Health (retired) Frederick M. Burkle, Jr., M.D., M.P.H. Clinical Professor, Dept. of International emergency and disaster medicine (University of Vermont College of Medicine, Surgery Univ. California Berkeley) Adjunct Tropical Medicine Guliz Erdem, M.D. (Hacettepe University Assistant Professor Molecular epidemiology of group A streptococcal & Faculty of Medicine, Turkey), guliz@hawaii.edu Dept. of Pediatrics staphylococcal infections; complications of strep infections like acute rheumatic fever. Allison Imrie, Ph.D. (Univ. of New South Wales, Assistant Professor, Dept. of HIV-1and dengue virus pathogenesis; evaluation of anti- Sydney, Australia), imrie@pbrc.hawaii.edu Public Health Sciences retroviral drugs on host metabolism; effects of HIV-1 infection on the neurological system 26
  • 27. Revised July, 2008 Claude Jourdan-Le Saux, Ph.D. (Universite Assistant Researcher, Dept. Human genetic disorders, asthma, interleukins and pulmonary d’Aix-Marseille, France), of Cell and Molecular function. claude@pbrc.hawaii.edu Biology HIV viral neutralization, Cytokine gene therapy in HIV specific Jerome H. Kim, M.D. (Yale University School of Clinical Associate Professor, T-cells, Molecular mechanisms of apoptosis in HIV infection, Medicine) Dept. of Medicine HTLV-I and -II mechanisms of Rex protein function, jkim@hivresearch.org tuberculosis (clinical syndromes) (on leave) Yuanan (Ron) Lu, Ph.D. (Univ. of Hawaii), Professor, Dept. of Public Gene therapy for HIV-1 infection, gene transfer approaches for ylu@pbrc.hawaii.edu Health Sciences neuroAIDS, immunodiagnosis of herpesvirus infection of green turtles, aquaculture virology Marian E. Melish, M.D. (Univ. of Rochester), Professor, Dept. of Pediatrics Staphylococcal infection and toxins; clinical infectious disease; marianm@kapiolani.org Kawasaki's syndrome Frederic Mercier, Ph.D. (University of Assistant Researcher, Neurovirology, neurogenesis and neural stem cellsBrain Montpellier II, France) fmercier@hawaii.edu Tropical Medicine anatomy and cytoarchitecture Francis D. Pien, M.D. (Univ. of Chicago) Associate Professor Clinical microbiology with special reference to diagnostic Dept. of Medicine bacteriology & parasitology; evaluation of antimicrobial agents Silvia Ratto Kim, Ph.D. (University of Genoa, Associate Researcher, Basic immunology of HIV-1 infection Italy) Hawaii AIDS Clinical silviak@hawaii.edu (on leave) Research Program Bruce Shiramizu, M.D. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake Professor, Depts. of Pathobiology of HIV-associated disorders City) Medicine and Pediatrics Raul C. Rudoy, M.D. (Cayetano Heredia Univ., Professor, Dept. of Pediatrics Clinical aspects of viral and bacterial disease in pediatrics Peru), rrudoy@hawaii.edu Elizabeth K. Tam, M.D. (Univ. of California, San Professor Genetic & environmental determinants of respiratory disease Francisco), tameliza@hawaii.edu Dept. of Medicine (eg. asthma); volcanic air pollution & modulators of respiratory health;genetics & tobacco smoke in lung disease. Richard Yanagihara, M.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati), Professor, Dept. of Pediatrics Transdisciplinary investigations of emerging & re-emerging yanagiha@pbrc.hawaii.edu infectious diseases; use of infectious agents to trace ancient & recent movements of human populations. 27
  • 28. Revised July, 2008 Qigui Yu, M.D., PhD (Wuannan Medical School, Assistant Professor, Dept. of HIV-1 Vaccines, HIV-1 specific CTL memory responses Fourth Military Medical University) Medicine 28