Dominican International School




                                  AP BIOLOGY

GRADE LEVEL: 11 AP                       ...
Unit Information
FIRST SEMESTER:
The Chemistry of Life - 7% (Percentage Goal of the Course)
Cells & Cellular Energies - 18...
September/ October                         .
II. The Cell                               AP Lab 3
A. Cell and Membrane Stru...
III. Genetics
A. Sexual Life Cycles                      Video: Gregor Mendel
B. Genes and Chromosomes
C. Inheritance     ...
& Eukaryote Evolution(Ch. 25-27)
                                         Worksheet – ‘Phylogenic tree of life’

         ...
C. Transport
D. Nutrition                               Lab
E. Reproduction and Development            Fruit seed lab. Emp...
B. Behavioural Biology                       anything that is unique about an assigned
C. Population Biology              ...
7. Week of September 21 assignments:
Read chapters 13 & 6
Lecture on cell cycle & division

8. Week of September 28 assign...
16. Week of November 23 assignments:
Read chapter 20,21
Lecture: eukaryotic genomes, DNA cloning, DNA technology, & gene e...
24. Week of February 1 assignments:
Read Chapter 34
Lecture: Lower Chordates
TEST Unit 5B - Invertebrates (chapters 32, 33...
32. Week of April 12 assignments:
Read chapters 44,45
Lecture: Controlling internal animal environments & chemical signals...
3. During the second semester, students will contact a research scientist or field biologist
in our area and conduct an in...
In this lab you will study plant mitosis using prepared slides of onion root tips and will
calculate the relative period o...
Objectives
* Discuss the principles of bacterial transformation
* Describe how to prepare competent E. coli cells
* Discus...
* Relate transpiration to the overall process of water transport in plants
* Discuss the importance of properties of water...
* Understand the physical and biological factors that affect the solubility of dissolved
gases in aquatic ecosystems
* Des...
Students learn to reflect on their thinking and to recognise that different thinking is
required in different learning sit...
URL:http://www.biology.arizona.edu/cell_bio/cell_bio.h
Description:
Biology Project

URL:http://www.cells.de/cellseng/inde...
URL:http://www.csuchico.edu/~curbanowicz/Darwin/Darwin
Description:
Online Paper about Darwin

URL:http://www.ucmp.berkele...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

TEACHER: John Dixon email: j_j_dixon2002@yahoo.co.uk.doc

2,119

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,119
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "TEACHER: John Dixon email: j_j_dixon2002@yahoo.co.uk.doc"

  1. 1. Dominican International School AP BIOLOGY GRADE LEVEL: 11 AP SY: 2009-2010 TEACHER: John Dixon email: j_j_dixon2002@yahoo.co.uk Course Description Advance Placement Program Biology is and Introductory College level course which provides an in depth, college level study of biological sciences. This course will also help students develop college level critical thinking skills, writing skills and study habits. It will also help students prepare for the comprehensive AP biology exam given in May, so that they may score a 3 or above and earn college credits for this year of study and hard work. The textbook for the course is the seventh edition of Neil A. Campbell and Jane B. Reece’s Biology. The first semester begins with orientation and a discussion on how to use the Campbell/Reese textbook, emphasizing the “Ten Themes in the Study of Life,” which are very similar to the “eight major themes” found in the official curricular requirements of AP Biology. The eight major themes, as put forth by the College Board, are: 1. Science as a Process 2. Evolution 3. Energy Transfer 4. Continuity and Change 5. Relationship of Structure to Function 6. Regulation 7. Interdependence in Nature 8. Science, Technology, and Society Of these, evolution is the underlying foundation for all modern biological thought, and this is emphasized in every unit.
  2. 2. Unit Information FIRST SEMESTER: The Chemistry of Life - 7% (Percentage Goal of the Course) Cells & Cellular Energies - 18 % Heredity & Molecular Genetics- 17% Evolutionary Biology - 8% SECOND SEMESTER Biological Diversity - 8% Plant Form & Function - 12% Animal Form & Function - 20% Ecology - 10% Content and/or Skills Taught: CONTENTS: Unit and Key Points Example Activities August Lab.1 (from AP Biology Lab Manual) Essential Question: What is Life? Diffusion and Osmosis I. The Chemistry of Life A. The Study of Life Lab B. The Chemical Context of Life effect of growth of Elodea by Acid C. Water and the Fitness of the precipitation Environment D. Carbon and the Molecular Diversity of Lab Life Controlling pH with a buffer solution E. The Structure and Function of Macromolecules Students prepare PowerPoint presentations on F. Metabolism the hierarchy of structural levels in biological organization. Textbook Chapters: 1-5 Class discussion using ‘Fishbowl Strategy’ on weeks 1-4 (4) Concepts 1.4, 1.5, 1.6 from Ch.1 Molecular Models Students use the “Design Your Own” Custom Molecular Model Kit to build fatty acids, fats, amino acids, and simple proteins using molecular models. Unit 1 Test – Biochemistry (Chapters 2-5)
  3. 3. September/ October . II. The Cell AP Lab 3 A. Cell and Membrane Structure Mitosis and Meiosis B. Cellular Respiration C. Photosynthesis AP Lab 4 D. Cell Communication and the Cell Cycle Plant pigments and photosynthesis Chapter 6-13 AP Lab 5 Cell respiration weeks 5- 10 (6) Online Activities: 1.‘The Biology Project’ Problem sets and tutorials covering cell structure and function, the cell cycle, meiosis and the cytoskeleton. 2. Cells.de: On-line service for Cell Biology - Media library section with movies of everything cellular. 3. Cells Alive! - Review the structure and function of plant and animal cells with an interactive tutorial. Watch the mitosis movie. 4. Online Onion Root Tips Lab 5. Nobel e-Museum - Play the Control of the Cell Cycle Game 6. Myosin Walking Mechanisms – Read research article on how myosin is used. Notes and diagrams on the general structure and function of plasma membranes. Students to use links provided to get other information about transport and other bacterial structures Students prepare a Powerpoint Presentation about cell structure and Function Inner Life of a Cell Video – Video Kreb cycle animation ATP Synthase Movies Photosynthesis Problem Sets Metabolism Problem Sets Unit 2A Test - Cells (Ch. 7,8,11,12,13) Unit 2B Test - Cellular Energies (Ch. 6,9,10) October/ November AP Lab 6A Essential Question: Why do hereditary Molecular Biology units and events produce genetic variation? Statistical Analysis of genetic crosses
  4. 4. III. Genetics A. Sexual Life Cycles Video: Gregor Mendel B. Genes and Chromosomes C. Inheritance Online Activities: D. Protein Synthesis 1. The Biology Project: Mendel Genetics - E. Viruses and Bacteria Mendelain Genetics Tutorial. F. Eukaryotic Genomes 2. Information on Mad-Cow Disease and G. DNA Technology Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in Humans http://www.who.int/inffs/en/fact113.html Chapter 13- 21 3. RNAi Web - Resource centre for RNA interference technology Weeks 11- 16 (6) Class discussion on DNA Technology using ‘Six Hat’ Thinking Strategy Genetics Basics Worksheet - Review worksheet for basic genetic crosses Additional Readings 1. Harvard Gazette - Article about research into meiosis in mammalian ovaries. 2. Cry of the Kalahari - Book reading . Student Presentations: ‘the Human Genome Project’ Unit Test 3A – Heredity (Ch 14,15) Unit Test 3B – Molecular Genetics (Ch 16-21) December AP Lab 8 Essential Question: Why is evolution the Population Genetics and Evolution foundation of all biology? IV. Evolution Research task – Darwin and The History of A. Darwin Evolutionary Thought B. Population Evolution C. Speciation Discussion of Charles Darwin’s life and D. Phylogeny publications using Fish Bowl strategy/Six hat thinking Chapter 22- 26 Role Play - Darwin vs. Lamark Court Case Study Guide Weeks 17-19 (3) Timeline Students create a timeline—1,000 mm of time. Video ‘The Odyssey of Life: The Ultimate Journey’, Phylogeny, Chemical Evolution, Prokaryote
  5. 5. & Eukaryote Evolution(Ch. 25-27) Worksheet – ‘Phylogenic tree of life’ Class discussion - 3 domains of life Interactive lecture (with Powerpoints slides showing each pictures of members of each many phyla, class) Unit 4 test (Ch 22-25) January/ February Essential Question: How does the Labs – Dissections; Eathworms/ Crayfish phylogeny of plants and animals reveal evolutionary relationships? Lab – Gram Staining V. Biological Diversity A. Origin of Life AP Lab 11 B. Prokaryotes Animal Behaviour C. Eukaryotes D. Fungi Diagrams and pictures of protists (PowerPoint E. Animal Evolution presentations) F. Invertebrates G. Vertebrates Video – Louis Pasteur Chapter 25-34 Choanoflagellates activity using still pictures from University of California, Berkeley’s Weeks 20 – 25 (6) Department of Molecular and Cell Biology website. Taxon Lift - imagery presentation and interactive animation Tree of Life Activity Science, Technology and Society homework activity – Write a letter to a non-biologist explaining why a phylogeny is worth funding Unit test 5A - Prokaryotes & Simple Eukaryotes (chapters 26-28, & 31): Unit test 5B - Invertebrates (chapters 32, 33) Unit test 5C - Vertebrates (chapter 35) February/ March Essential Question: How does the AP Lab 9 phylogeny of plants and animals reveal Transpiration evolutionary relationships? (cont.) VI. Plants Lab A. Plant Diversity Flower Dissection, students see pollen grains B. Structure and Growth and ovules.
  6. 6. C. Transport D. Nutrition Lab E. Reproduction and Development Fruit seed lab. Emphasizing that each seed F. Control Systems came from a fertilized ovule. Chapter 21,29,30 35-39 Planting activities including stem cuttings and planting a seed. Weeks 26- 29 (4) Image presentations of Forestry through PowerPoint’s . Unit 6A Test - Plants (Chapters 29, 30, & 35); Unit 6B Test - Plants (chapters 36-39) March/ April AP Lab 10 Essential Question: How do species of Physiology of the Circulatory System diverse evolutionary history and varying complexity solve problems to all? AP lab 11 VII. Animals Animal Behaviour A. Structure and Function B. Nutrition Lab C. Circulation and Respiration Lab: Sheep’s Brain and Cow’s Eye (As D. Body’s Defense Teacher demonstration) E. The Internal Environment F. Chemical Signals Student presentations and discussion on G. Reproduction principles of animal form and function H. Development I. Nervous System Interactive PowerPoint presentation on the J. Sensory and Motor Mechanisms different systems Lectures with PowerPoint presentations on Chapter 40 – 49 Chemical signals and Animal Reproduction Weeks 30 – 34 (5) Class handouts of diagrams of bodily systems Unit 7A Test - Animal Systems (chapters 40-43) Unit 7 B Test - Animal Systems (Chapters 44-49) May Essential Question: Why do biotic and AP Lab 12 A abiotic factors interact to create the Dissolved Oxygen ecological problems that exist on earth today? Research task using the Internet and chapter VIII. Ecology 50 in their textbooks to find the latitude, A. Biosphere Ecology temperature range, rainfall, flora, fauna, and
  7. 7. B. Behavioural Biology anything that is unique about an assigned C. Population Biology biome. Present findings to class D. Community Ecology E. Ecosystems Class discussion on the introduction of a non- F. Conservation Biology native species to an environment and how that organism has affected the local environment Chapter 50 - 55 Diagrams and concept maps Week 35- 37 (3) Unit 8 Test ( Ch 50-55) Major Assignments and/or Assessments: Weekly Assignments – First Quarter Week 1. Week of August 10 assignments: Read Chapters 1 & 2 Lecture - biological themes & organization Abstracts assigned 2. Week of August 17 assignments: Read chapters 3 & 4; Lecture Water’s Properties/Importance of carbon & functional groups Lab: Reversible reactions 3. Week of August 24 assignments: Read chapter 5 Lecture: Carbohydrates & lipids Lab : Organic Models 4. Week of August 31 assignments: Notes on proteins & nucleic acids; AP Lab 1 – Diffusion and Osmosis TEST - Unit 1 - Chemistry & Biochemistry (chapters 1-5) 5. Week of September 7 assignments: Interims! Read Chapters 7 & 8 Lecture: Cell organelles & Cytoskeleton Complete AP Lab 1 & work on write up Abstract write up due 6. Week of September 14 assignments: Read Chapters 11 & 12 Lecture: Cell membrane movement & cell communication
  8. 8. 7. Week of September 21 assignments: Read chapters 13 & 6 Lecture on cell cycle & division 8. Week of September 28 assignments: TEST - Unit 2A - Cells (chapters 7, 8, 11, 12, 13) Read chapter 9 Lecture: Metabolism & cellular respiration AP Lab 3: Mitosis & Meiosis 9. Week of October 5 assignments: Read chapter 10 Lecture: Photosynthesis AP Lab 4: Plant pigments Second Quarter 10. Week of October 12 assignments: Begin reading Cry of the Kalahari; Lecture: Cellular energetics review TEST – Unit 2B - Cellular Energetics (chapters 6, 9, & 10) AP Lab 5: Cellular Respiration; 11. Week of October 19 assignments: Lecture: Mendelian genetics Video: Gregor Mendel 12. Week of October 26 assignments: Homework on Genetic Crosses; Read Chapter 15; Video: Eternal Enemies; Lecture: Chromosomes; CRY quiz #1 13. Week of November 2 assignments: Interims! Read Chapter 16; Lecture: History of DNA TEST – Unit 3A - Heredity (chapters 14 & 15) 14. Week of November 9 assignments: Read chapter 17 and 18; Lecture: DNA & its Structure; Replication & repair; CRY quiz #2 Lecture: Protein Synthesis 15. Week of November 16 assignments: Read chapter 19; Lecture: Transcription and Translation CRY quiz # 3; AP Lab 6A: Transformation (Molecular Biology)
  9. 9. 16. Week of November 23 assignments: Read chapter 20,21 Lecture: eukaryotic genomes, DNA cloning, DNA technology, & gene expression TEST – Unit 3B - Molecular Genetics (chapters16-21); Cry of the Kalahari paper due! 17. Week of November 30 assignments: Read chapters 22 & 23 Lecture on Darwinism 18. Week of December 7 assignments: Read chapters 23 & 24 Lecture: Population Genetics and origin of species AP Lab 8: Population Genetics Set article abstract writing task 19. Week of December 14 assignments: Read chapter 25 Lecture: Tracing phylogeny Practice keying UNIT 4 TEST - Evolution (Chapters 22-25) Role Playing (Darwin and Lamark) -----------------BREAK------------------- Third Quarter 20. Week of January 4 assignments: Read chapters 26 & 27 Lecture: Early earth, prokaryotes, & protests Article abstract due Set Scientist interview task 21. Week of January 11 assignments: Read chapters 28 & 31 Lecture -Algae & Fungi Video: Louis Pasteur 22.Week of January 18 assignments Interims ! Read chapter 32 UNIT 5A TEST - Prokaryotes & Simple Eukaryotes (chapters 26-28, & 31): Scientist Interview Assignment Due Lab: Gram Staining 23.Week of January 25 assignments: Read chapter 33 Lecture: Invertebrates & introduction to animals Lab: Earthworm Dissection
  10. 10. 24. Week of February 1 assignments: Read Chapter 34 Lecture: Lower Chordates TEST Unit 5B - Invertebrates (chapters 32, 33) Lab: Crayfish Dissection 25. Week of February 8 assignments: Read chapter 29, 30 Lecture: Vertebrates TEST Unit 5C - Vertebrates (chapter 35) AP Lab 11: Animal Behavior Abstract writing 3 set 26. Week of February 22 assignments: Read Chapters 35 Lecture: Plant Control & Development Lab - Fruit seed lab. 27.Week of March 1 assignments: Read chapters 38,39 Lecture: Bryophytes & seedless vascular plants Lab -Flower Dissection TEST - Unit 6A - Plants (chapters 29,30 & 35) 28. Week of March 8 assignments: Read chapter 36 Lecture: Angiosperms AP Lab 9: Transpiration Fourth Quarter 29. Week of March 15 assignments: Read chapter 37 Scientific journal abstract due Lecture: Transport in plants & Plant Nutrition TEST - Unit 6B on Plants (Chapters 36-39); 30. Week of March 22 assignments: Interims Read chapters 40,41 Lecture: Animal structure & function Lab: AP Test Prep 31. Week of March 29 assignments: Read chapters 42,43 Lecture: Animal nutrition AP Lab 10 - Physiology of Circulation
  11. 11. 32. Week of April 12 assignments: Read chapters 44,45 Lecture: Controlling internal animal environments & chemical signals TEST Unit 7A - Animal Systems (chapters 40-43) 33. Week of April 19 assignments: Lecture: Animal reproduction, development, Read chapters 46,47 LAB: AP Test prep 34. Week of April 26 assignments Lecture: The nervous system, & senses Read chapters 48, 49, 51 Lab: AP Lab 11 – Animal Behaviour TEST Unit 7 B - Animal Systems (Chapters 44-49) 35.Week of May 3 assignments Read chapters 50, 52, 53 Lecture: Ecology & Behavioural Ecology AP Lab 12 A - Dissolved Oxygen in Ecosystems 36. Week of May 10 assignments: Read chapters 54, 55 Lecture: Ecosystems Semester test review UNIT 8 TEST - Ecology (chapters 50-55) 37. Week of May 17 assignments: Fetal Pig Dissection AP Exams 38. Week of May 24 assignments: Complete Fetal Pig Dissection Projects 1. Each quarter, students will read and abstract a current article from a scientific journal. Articles must be chosen from journals published during the 12 months prior to the abstract due date. The abstract and a copy of the article or journal must be turned into the instructor in an abstract folder and must follow the format provided by the instructor. Students should follow the required abstract format that will be presented at the beginning of the year. 2. During the first semester, students will read and write a paper on the research book by Mark and Delia Owens entitled, Cry of the Kalahari. The book will be divided into three sections with a written test at the end of each section to ensure that students are keeping up with their reading. The paper will count as a major exam grade
  12. 12. 3. During the second semester, students will contact a research scientist or field biologist in our area and conduct an interview about their current research. Using their interview notes, they will write a newspaper article (Who, what, when, where, and Why) about this scientist and their research. This article is due during the third nine weeks. AP Labs Laboratory activities are an integral component of any college level Biology course. These activities allow students to process data, formulate hypotheses, and apply what they have learned from a lecture or reading assignment. The College Board has developed 12 exercises that are both hands-on and high-level, to provide students with an opportunity to gain experiences offered at the college level. Content and/or Skills Taught: Laboratory 1: Diffusion and Osmosis ( 80-90 minutes ) Overview In this lab you will investigate the movement of water across semi-permeable membranes. You will also examine the effect of solute concentrations on water potential as it relates to living plant tissues. Objectives * Describe the mechanisms of diffusion and osmosis * Describe how solute size and molar concentration affect the process of diffusion through a selectively permeable membrane * Design an experiment to demonstrate and measure water potential * Relate osmotic potential to solute concentration and water potential (Mr. Knight’s Notes on Water Potential) * Describe how pressure affects the water potential of a solution * Describe the effects of water gain or loss in animal or plant cells * Calculate the water potential of living plant cells from experimental data Laboratory 2: Enzyme Catalysis - ( 80-90 minutes ) Overview In this lab you will measure the rate of a reaction in the presence and absence of a catalyst. The catalyst, (catalase), is an enzyme in cells that catalyzes the breakdown of toxic H202. Objectives * Graph data from an enzyme experiment * Determine the rates of enzymatically catalyzed reactions 6 * Discuss the method for determining enzyme activity * Discuss the relationship between dependent and independent variables * Discuss the effect of initial reaction rates produced by changes in temperature, pH, enzyme concentrations, and substrate concentrations * Design an experiment to measure the effect of enzyme activity produced by changes in temperature, pH, enzyme concentrations, and substrate concentrations Laboratory 3: Mitosis and Meiosis - ( 80-90 minutes ) Overview
  13. 13. In this lab you will study plant mitosis using prepared slides of onion root tips and will calculate the relative period of the phases of mitosis in the meristem of root tissue. You will also study the crossing over and recombination that occurs during meiosis. Objectives * Compare the events of mitosis in plant cells with those of animal cells * Demonstrate the procedure to stain tissue for the identification of cells in the various stages ofmitosis * Calculate the relative duration of mitosis Laboratory 4: Plant Pigments and Photosynthesis - ( 80-90 minutes ) Overview In this lab you will separate plant pigments using paper chromatography. You will also measure the rate of photosynthesis in isolated chloroplasts using a measurement technique that involves the reduction of the dye, DPIP. The transfer of electrons during the light- dependent reactions of photosynthesis reduces DPIP and changes its color from blue to colorless. Objectives * Understand the principles of chromatography * Calculate Rf values * Design an experiment in which chromatography is used as a separation technique * Describe a technique for determining photosynthetic rate * Understand the relationship between dependent and independent variables * Describe how light intensity, light wavelength, and temperature can affect photosynthesis * Design an experiment to measure how light intensity, light wavelength, and temperature can affect photosynthetic rates Laboratory 5: Cell Respiration - ( 80-90 minutes ) Overview In this lab you will measure oxygen consumption during respiration as a change in gas volume in germinating and non-germinating peas at two different temperatures. Objectives * Discuss the gas laws as they apply to the function of a respirometer * Interpret data related to the effects of temperature on cell respiration * Interpret data related to the effects of germination or nongermination on cell respiration * Explain or determine the significance of a control * Explain the relationship between dependent and independent variables * Calculate a rate of cell respiration by utilizing graphed data * Design an experiment to use a respirometer to measure cellular respiration Laboratory 6: Molecular Biology - ( 80-90 minutes ) Overview In this lab you will investigate some basic principles of genetic engineering. Plasmids containing specific fragments of foreign DNA will be used to transform E. coli cells, conferring antibiotic (ampicillin) resistance and the Lac + phenotype (ability to metabolize lactose). Restriction enzyme digests of phage lambda DNA will also be used to demonstrate techniques for separating and identifying DNA fragments using gel electrophoresis.
  14. 14. Objectives * Discuss the principles of bacterial transformation * Describe how to prepare competent E. coli cells * Discuss the mechanisms of gene transfer using plasmid vectors * Discuss the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and tell how to select positively for transformed cells that are antibiotic resistant * Discuss the mechanisms of action for restriction endonucleases * Discuss how a plasmid can be engineered to include a piece of foreign DNA that alters the phenotype of the transformed cells * Understand and be able to explain the principles of electrophoresis as they pertain to separating and identifying DNA fragments Laboratory 7: Genetics Of Drosophila - ( 80-90 minutes ) Overview In this lab you will use the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to do genetic crosses. You will learn how to collect and manipulate fruit flies, collect data from F1 and F2 generations, and analyze the results from a monohybrid, dihybrid or sex link cross. Objectives * Conduct a genetics experiment for a number of generations * Compare predicted results with actual results * Explain the importance of Chi-Square analysis * Design genetic crosses in an experiment to illustrate independent assortment and sex linkage * Discuss the life cycle of the fruit fly, recognize the sex of fruit flies, and recognize several types of classic mutations Laboratory 8: Population Genetics and Evolution - ( 80-90 minutes ) Overview In this lab you will learn about Hardy-Weinberg law of genetic equilibrium and study the relationship between evolution and changes in allele frequency by using your class as a sample population. Objectives * Calculate allele and genotype frequencies using the Hardy-Weinberg theorem * Discuss the effect of natural selection on allelic frequencies * Explain and predict the effect of allelic frequencies of selection against the homozygous recessive * Discuss the relationship between evolution and changes in allele frequencies, as measured by deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg law of genetic equilibrium Laboratory 9: Transpiration - ( 80-90 minutes ) Overview In this lab you will apply what you learned about water potential from Lab 1 (Diffusion and Osmosis) to the movement of water within the plant. You will study the organization of the plant stem as it relates to these processes by observing sections of fresh tissue. Objectives * Describe how differences in water potential affect the transport of water from roots to stems to leaves
  15. 15. * Relate transpiration to the overall process of water transport in plants * Discuss the importance of properties of water - including hydrogen bonding, adhesion, and cohesion - to the transport of water in plants * Quantitatively demonstrate the effects of different environmental conditions on the rate of transpiration in plants * Identify the vascular tissues of the plant stem and describe their functions Laboratory 10: Physiology of the Circulatory System - ( 80-90 minutes ) Overview You will learn how to measure blood pressure and measure pulse rate under different physiological conditions: standing, reclining, after the baroreceptor reflex, and during and immediately after exercise. The blood pressure and pulse rate will be analyzed and related to a relative fitness index. You will also measure the effect of temperature on the heart rate of the Daphnia magna, and calculate a Q10 for the relationship between temperature and heart rate. Objectives * Measure pulse rate * Measure blood pressure * Describe the relationship between the changes in heart rate and blood pressure relative to changes in body position * Describe the relationship between changes in heart rate and exercise * Determine the "fitness index" for an adult human * Perform statistical analysis on class data * Define Q10 * Determine the Q10 of heart rate in a living organism such as Daphnia Laboratory 11: Behavior: Habitat Selection Overview In this lab, you will examine the habitat preferences of the brine shrimp, Artemia. You will use controlled experimentation to determine the thermal, pH, and light environments selected by Artemia. Based on your experience with this lab, you will design an experiment that could be used to survey other variables and other organisms. Objectives * Describe the relationship between dependent and independent variables * Discuss the value of comparing experimental results with control results * Graph an interpret histogram data * Measure the volumes, distances, and temperature using metric scales * Design and conduct an experiment to measure the effect of environmental variables on habitat selection Laboratory 12: Dissolved Oxygen and Aquatic Primary Productivity Overview You will measure and analyze the dissolved oxygen concentration in water samples using the Winkler technique. You will also measure and analyze the primary productivity of natural waters or lab cultures Objectives * Describe the physiological importance of carbon and oxygen in an ecosystem
  16. 16. * Understand the physical and biological factors that affect the solubility of dissolved gases in aquatic ecosystems * Describe a technique for measuring dissolved oxygen * Define primary productivity * Describe the relationship between dissolved oxygen and the processes of photosynthesis and respiration as they affect primary productivity in an ecosystem * Design an experiment to measure primary productivity in an aquatic ecosystem * Understand the effect of light and nutrients on photosynthesis Discussion work The strategies below are two of the methods we will use for discussion work: Fishbowl strategy A fishbowl is traditionally a classroom discussion group divided into two parts: the "inner circle" or fishbowl, consisting of four or five people who discuss a topic, and the "outer group," consisting of up to 20 people who observe. This strategy is effective in facilitating discussion and can be modified for use in the online classroom in a variety of ways. The instructor assigns 4 or 5 students to the fishbowl (on the discussion board) to discuss a specific topic, answer a question or solve a problem. The remaining students observe and comment on both the process and content of the discussion. At a designated point, the instructor then selects a new group and new topic for the fishbowl. or Students are asked to submit one question concerning the course material in a specific module for the "fishbowl" (discussion board, digital drop box, email, etc.). At a designated point, the instructor assigns questions to groups of 4-5 students for discussion while the remaining students observe and comment on both the process and content of the discussion Six Thinking Hats Strategies Six Thinking Hats is a strategy devised by Edward de Bono which requires students (and teachers) to extend their way of thinking about a topic by wearing different thinking hats: • White hat thinking identifies the facts and details of a topic • Purple hat thinking examines the negative aspects of a topic • Yellow hat thinking focuses on the positive aspects of a topic • Red hat thinking looks at a topic from the point of view of emotions and feelings • Green hat thinking requires imagination and lateral thinking about a topic • Blue hat thinking focuses on reflection, metacognition (thinking about the thinking that is required), and the need to understand the big picture. The colours help students to visualise six separate modes of thinking and to convey something of the meaning of that thinking, for example, red as pertaining to matters of the heart, white as neutral and objective.
  17. 17. Students learn to reflect on their thinking and to recognise that different thinking is required in different learning situations. Consider an issue or topic which you would like your students to explore, such as joining a particular conservation group. Students work in small groups and ask themselves a range of questions: • White hat what are the facts about the conservation group? • Purple hat What are the negatives about this group? • Yellow hat What are the positives and what do people gain from belonging to this group? • Red hat How does belonging to the group make us feel? • Green hat What could be changed to make the conservation group more accessible or more appealing? • Blue hat How does this organisation impact on conservation efforts? Groups report back to the whole class about the types of ideas generated using the six hats. The teacher points to the breadth of views and thoughts, and explains that this is as a result of making ourselves apply a range of different types of ‘thinking’. Six Hat Thinking can be applied to many situations in which brainstorming, problem solving, creative and lateral thinking are required. This strategy can be a very useful tool in examining all aspects of an issue. Textbooks Title:Biology (7th Edition) Publisher: Benjamin Cummings Published Date: 13 December, 2004 Author: Neil A. Campbell Second Author: Jane B. Reece Description: Title:Study Guide for Biology Publisher: Pearson Publications Company Published Date: January, 2005 Author: Martha R. Taylor Second Author: Campbell Description: Other Course Materials Material Type:Other Description: Owens, Mark and Delia. Cry of the Kalahari. Fontana/Collins Publisher, 1984. ISBN: 0395647800 Websites
  18. 18. URL:http://www.biology.arizona.edu/cell_bio/cell_bio.h Description: Biology Project URL:http://www.cells.de/cellseng/index.jsp Description: Videos and Interactive medias URL:http://www.cellsalive.com/ Description: Cell animations and tutorials URL:http://www.biology.arizona.edu/cell_bio/activities Description: Online Onion Root Tip Lab URL:http://www.news.uiuc.edu/scitips/03/0605selvin.htm Description: Research Article about myosin URL:http://nobelprize.org/educational_games/medicine/2 Description: Interactive game - cell cycle URL:http://aimediaserver.com/studiodaily/videoplayer/? Description: THE INNER LIFE OF THE CELL URL:http://www.csun.edu/~hcchm001/wwwatp2.htm Description: ATP synthase sites for Biochemistry URL:http://local.lander.edu/flux/sordaria%20Tetrad%20E Description: Sordaria Octads Prep URL:http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/2004/03.25/11- Description: Articles and research URL:http://tolweb.org/tree/phylogeny.html Description: Tree of Life URL:http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/history/evothought.ht Description: Evolutionary thought URL:http://www.literature.org/authors/darwin-charles/ Description: Charles Darwin Publications
  19. 19. URL:http://www.csuchico.edu/~curbanowicz/Darwin/Darwin Description: Online Paper about Darwin URL:http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/help/taxaform.html Description: Taxonomy URL:http://worms.zoology.wisc.edu/embryology_main.html Description: Site of development URL:http://www.phschool.com/science/biology_place/labb Description: laboratory activities Periodicals Title:Aquaporin Water Channels Description: Title:Bacterium Helicobacter pylori & Gastritis Description: Title:Odorant Receptors & Olfaction Description: Title:Fimbriae, Fibrils, Sex and Fuzzy Coats Description: Title:Analytical Methods for Biomolecules Description: Title:Programmed Cell Death Description: Title:The Flower & the Fly - Insect Mouthparts Description: Title:Chemiosmotic Theory Description:

×