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    Microsoft Word - AY0910 Graduate Student Handbook Microsoft Word - AY0910 Graduate Student Handbook Document Transcript

    • DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN GENETICS GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK ACADEMIC YEAR 2009 - 2010 Department of Human Genetics David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA 695 Charles E. Young Drive South Los Angeles, CA 90095-7088
    • Table of Contents Curriculum Course Requirements ..................................................................................................... 2 Required Courses ......................................................................................................... 12 Elective Courses .......................................................................................................... 14 Computational Human Genetics Minor Track Courses............................................... 17 Seminars ...................................................................................................................... 22 Supplemental Educational Activities ........................................................................... 24 Program Requirements Master’s Degree ........................................................................................................... 25 Doctoral Degree ........................................................................................................... 26 Exams and Research Proposals Hypothetical, Non-Hypothetical, and Oral Examinations ........................................... 29 Preparing for Orals ...................................................................................................... 31 General Information Summary of Events, Milestones, Things to Do and Such .......................................... 32 Calendar ....................................................................................................................... 34 Registrar’s Office Services .......................................................................................... 35 Miscellaneous Information .......................................................................................... 36 Directories Who to See in the Department of Human Genetics ..................................................... 38 Human Genetics Graduate Students ............................................................................ 39 Human Genetics Faculty.............................................................................................. 40 AY 09-10 1
    • COURSE REQUIREMENTS NOTE: From the first quarter of graduate study to the last, students are required to enroll in no less than 12 units per quarter. This is achieved by combining required courses and electives, which carry a fixed number of units, with laboratory research (596 - 599 courses). While required courses and electives have fixed unit values, the unit value for courses numbered 596-599 will equal the number of units needed, in addition to required courses and electives, to reach the required 12 units per quarter. Any questions regarding the interpretation of or deviation from these course requirements should be addressed to the Graduate Student Advisor (GSA). PROGRAM FOR DIRECT ADMIT STUDENTS A. Laboratory Track First Year. The first year program for Direct Admit students in the Laboratory Track consists of two or three one-quarter laboratory rotations together with the courses listed below. Laboratory rotations allow the students to choose from among the various program faculty. Two laboratory rotations are required; a third is optional. [Rotations last one quarter each and are contingent upon the faculty member agreeing to the rotation request.] Fall Winter Spring CM253 Advanced Principles of CM267A Advanced Principles of CM234 Ethics and Accountability in Molecular and Cellular Biosciences Molecular and Cellular Biosciences Biomedical Research (2 units) I (6 units) II (6 units) 200 Level Elective (2-4 units) M267B Cell Biology Seminar 200 Level Elective (2-4 units) (4 units) 596 Research Rotation (4 units) 596 Research Rotation (2 units) 596 Research Rotation (2-4 units) Second Year. By the beginning of the second year, students shall have chosen a mentor, and should now enroll in 596 Lab Research under that mentor each quarter. One quarter of teaching (“TA-ship”) is required and is recommended to be taken in the second (or third) year. Students must enroll in the 375 course of the department for which they will teach, and must also take the 495 TA Training course offered by that department. Students with a particular interest in teaching may take an additional TA-ship in subsequent years. *Beginning in the second year, students are required to take at least one quarter of Human Genetics 282: Human Genetics Journal Club and Seminar each year. Fall Winter Spring 375 TA Practicum (2-4 units) 236A Advanced Human Genetics 220 Ethical Issues In Human 495 Teacher Training (2 units) (4 units) Genetics (2 units) 236B Advanced Human Genetics (4 units) 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 596 Lab Research (2-12 units) 596 Lab Research (2-12 units) 596 Lab Research (2-12 units) AY 09-10 2
    • Third Year. By the third year, students have taken all “required” courses. Students who have taken their Oral Preliminary Exam (Hypothetical) will enroll in 597 Preparation for PhD Qualifying Exam. Remaining coursework may include TA-ships and related courses and six (6) units of electives, which may be taken in either the third, fourth or fifth years as shown below. Fall Winter Spring 375 TA Practicum (2-4 units) 495 Teacher Training (2 units) Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar (2 units)* (2 units)* (2 units)* 596/597 Lab Research (2-12 units) 596/597 Lab Research (2-12 units) 596/597 Lab Research (2-12 units) Fourth & Fifth Years. During the last two years of graduate study, students who have Advanced to Candidacy enroll in 599 Dissertation Research. By this time, students may have completed all coursework, or may have remaining electives. Fall Winter Spring Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar (2 units)* (2 units)* (2 units)* 599 Dissertation Research 599 Dissertation Research 599 Dissertation Research (2-12 units) (2-12 units) (2-12 units) * Enrollment in HG 282 can be applied to the 6-unit elective requirement. AY 09-10 3
    • B. Computational Human Genetics Track Students in the Computational Human Genetics track take seven required courses, two electives in Computational and Statistical Genetics, two electives in Bioinformatics, Genomics, and Proteomics, and one Computer Programming elective. Students will also enroll in laboratory rotations and seminars. This will allow students more flexibility to concentrate on those aspects of computational human genetics that best complement their research. All students in the Computational Human Genetics Track should consult with Dr. Janet Sinsheimer to plan their academic schedule. First Year. The first year program for Direct Admit students in the Computational Human Genetics Track consists of the courses listed below and the 596 Research Rotation. Eight units of undergraduate Statistics (Can be satisfied by Stat 100A/100B, Stat 110A/110B Biost 110A/110B. Statistics 180 may be substituted for any of the “B” quarter courses). One laboratory rotation is required in the first year; a second or third is optional. One quarter of 596 should be taken in a data-generating laboratory so that the student will become familiar with benchwork. [Rotations last one quarter each and are contingent upon the faculty member agreeing to the rotation request.] Fall Winter Spring CM253 Advanced Principles of C234 Ethics and Accountability in Molecular and Cellular Biosciences Biomedical Research (2 units) I (6 units) UG Statistics (4 units) UG Statistics (4 units) Approved Computational Human Approved Computational Human Approved Computational Human Genetics elective (4 units) Genetics elective (4 units) Genetics elective (2 units) 596 Research Rotation (4 units) 596 Research Rotation (4 units) Second Year. By the beginning of the second year, students shall have chosen a mentor, and should now enroll in 596 Research under that mentor each quarter through the third year. One quarter of teaching (“TA-ship”) is required and is recommended to be taken in the second (or third) year. Students must enroll in the 375 course of the department for which they will teach, and must also take the 495 TA Training course offered by that department. Students with a particular interest in teaching may take an additional TA-ship in the second or any subsequent year. Beginning in the second year, students are required to take at least one quarter of Human Genetics 282: Human Genetics Journal Club and Seminar each year. Fall Winter Spring Approved Computational Human 236A Advanced Human Genetics 236B Advanced Human Genetics Genetics elective (4 units) (4 units) (4 units) Approved Computational Human 375 TA Practicum( 2-4 units) 220 Ethical Issues In Human Genetics elective (4 units) 495 Teacher Training(2 units) Genetics (2 units) 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 596 Research (2-4 units) 596 Research (2-4 units) 596 Research (4-6 units) AY 09-10 4
    • Third Year. By the third year, students have taken all “required” courses. Remaining coursework may include TA-ships and related courses, and the approved Computational Human Genetics elective course, which should be taken in the third or subsequent years. Students who have taken their Oral Preliminary Exam (Hypothetical) will enroll in 597 Preparation for PhD Qualifying Exam. Fall Winter Spring Approved Computational Human Genetics elective (4 units) 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 596/597 Research (2-12 units) 596/597 Research (2-12 units) 596/597 Research (2-12 units) Fourth & Fifth Years. During the last two years of graduate study, students who have Advanced to Candidacy enroll in 599 Dissertation Research. By this time, students may have completed all coursework, or may have remaining electives. Fall Winter Spring Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar (2 units)* (2 units)* (2 units)* 599 Dissertation Research 599 Dissertation Research 599 Dissertation Research (2-12 units) (2-12 units) (2-12 units) * Enrollment in HG 282 can be applied to the 6-unit elective requirement. AY 09-10 5
    • PROGRAM FOR ACCESS STUDENTS A. Laboratory Track NOTE: ACCESS students usually enter the Human Genetics program on July 1 of their first year of graduate study at UCLA. All ACCESS students are responsible to meet any and all ACCESS program requirements in addition to Human Genetics program requirements. First Year. The first year program for ACCESS students as described below is consistent with ACCESS program requirements. First-year ACCESS students take three one-quarter laboratory rotations together with the courses listed below. Laboratory rotations allow the students to choose from among the various program faculty. Two laboratory rotations are required; a third is optional. [Rotations last one quarter each and are contingent upon the faculty member agreeing to the rotation request.] Fall Winter Spring CM253 Advanced Principles of CM267A Advanced Principles of CM234 Ethics and Accountability in Molecular and Cellular Biosciences Molecular and Cellular Biosciences Biomedical Research (2 units) I (6 units) II (6 units) M267B Cell Biology Seminar 200 Level Elective Course (2-4 (4 units) units) 200 Level Elective Course (2-4 units) 596 Research Rotation (6 units) 596 Research Rotation (2 units) 596 Research Rotation (2-4 units) Second Year. By the beginning of the second year, students shall have chosen a mentor, and should now enroll in 596 Lab Research under that mentor each quarter through the third year. Two quarters of teaching (“TA-ship”) are required and recommended to be taken once each in the second and third years. Students must enroll in the 375 course of the department for which they will teach, and must also take the 495 TA Training course offered by that department. *Beginning in the second year, students are required to take at least one quarter of Human Genetics 282: Human Genetics Journal Club and Seminar (2 units) each year. Fall Winter Spring 375 TA Practicum (2-4 units) 236A Advanced Human Genetics 220 Ethical Issues In Human 495 Teacher Training ( 2 units) (4 units) Genetics ( 2 units) 236B Advanced Human Genetics (4 units) 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 596 Lab Research (2-12 units) 596 Lab Research (2-12 units) 596 Lab Research (2-12 units) AY 09-10 6
    • Third Year. By the third year, students have taken all “required” courses. Remaining coursework will include TA-ships and related courses and 6 units of electives, which may be taken in either the third, fourth or fifth years. Students who have taken their Oral Preliminary Exam (Hypothetical) will enroll in 597 Preparation for PhD Qualifying Exam. Fall Winter Spring 375 TA Practicum (2-4 units) 495 Teacher Training (2 units) Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar (2 units)* (2 units)* (2 units)* 596/597 Lab Research (2-12 units) 596/597 Lab Research (2-12 units) 596/597 Lab Research (2-12 units) Fourth & Fifth Years. During the last two years of graduate study, students who have Advanced to Candidacy enroll in 599 Dissertation Research. By this time, students may have completed all coursework, or may have remaining electives. Fall Winter Spring 599 Dissertation Research 599 Dissertation Research 599 Dissertation Research (2-12 units) (2-12 units) (2-12 units) Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar (2 units)* (2 units)* (2 units)* * Enrollment in HG 282 can be applied to the 6-unit elective requirement. AY 09-10 7
    • B. Computational Human Genetics Track Students in the Computational Human Genetics track take seven required courses, two electives in Computational and Statistical Genetics, two electives in Bioinformatics, Genomics, and Proteomics, and one Computer Programming elective. Students will also enroll in laboratory rotations and seminars. This will allow students more flexibility to concentrate on those aspects of computational human genetics that best complement their research. All students in the Computational Human Genetics Track should consult with Dr. Janet Sinsheimer to plan their academic schedule. First Year. The first year program for Direct Admit students in the Computational Human Genetics Track consists of the courses listed below and the 596 Research Rotation. Eight units of undergraduate Statistics (Can be satisfied by Stat 100A/100B, Stat 110A/110B Biost 110A/110B. Statistics 180 may be substituted for any of the “B” quarter courses). One laboratory rotation is required in the first year; a second or third is optional. One quarter of 596 should be taken in a data-generating laboratory so that the student will become familiar with benchwork. [Rotations last one quarter each and are contingent upon the faculty member agreeing to the rotation request.] Fall Winter Spring CM253 Advanced Principles of CM234 Ethics and Accountability in Molecular and Cellular Biosciences Biomedical Research (2 units) I (6 units) UG Statistics (4 units) UG Statistics (4 units) Approved Computational Human Approved Computational Human Approved Computational Human Genetics elective (4 units) Genetics elective (4 units) Genetics elective (4 units) 596 Research Rotation (4 units) 596 Research Rotation (4 units) Second Year. By the beginning of the second year, students shall have chosen a mentor, and should now enroll in 596 Research under that mentor each quarter through the third year. One quarter of teaching (“TA-ship”) is required and is recommended to be taken in the second (or third) year. Students must enroll in the 375 course of the department for which they will teach, and must also take the 495 TA Training course offered by that department. Students with a particular interest in teaching may take an additional TA-ship in the second or any subsequent year. Beginning in the second year, students are required to take at least one quarter of Human Genetics 282: Human Genetics Journal Club and Seminar each year. Fall Winter Spring Approved Computational Human 236A Advanced Human Genetics 236B Advanced Human Genetics Genetics elective (4 units) (4 units) (4 units) Approved Computational Human 375 TA Practicum(2-4 units) 220 Ethical Issues In Human Genetics elective (4 units) 495 Teacher Training(2 units) Genetics (2 units) 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 596 Research (2-4 units) 596 Research (2-4 units) 596 Research (4-6 units) AY 09-10 8
    • Third Year. By the third year, students have taken all “required” courses. Remaining coursework may include TA-ships and related courses, and the approved Computational Human Genetics elective course, which should be taken in the third or subsequent years. Students who have taken their Oral Preliminary Exam (Hypothetical) will enroll in 597 Preparation for PhD Qualifying Exam. Fall Winter Spring Approved Computational Human Genetics elective (4 units) 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 596/597 Research (2-12 units) 596/597 Research (2-12 units) 596/597 Research (2-12 units) Fourth & Fifth Years. During the last two years of graduate study, students who have Advanced to Candidacy enroll in 599 Dissertation Research. By this time, students may have completed all coursework, or may have remaining electives. Fall Winter Spring Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar Elective (2-6 units)/ 282 Seminar (2 units)* (2 units)* (2 units)* 599 Dissertation Research 599 Dissertation Research 599 Dissertation Research (2-12 units) (2-12 units) (2-12 units) AY 09-10 9
    • PROGRAM FOR MASTERS STUDENTS A. Laboratory Track First Year. The first year program for Masters students in the Laboratory Track consists of two or three one-quarter laboratory rotations together with the courses listed below. Laboratory rotations allow the students to choose from among the various program faculty. At least one laboratory rotation is recommended, but not required. Fall Winter Spring CM253 Advanced Principles of M267A Advanced Principles of M234 Ethics and Accountability in Molecular and Cellular Biosciences Molecular and Cellular Biosciences Biomedical Research (2 units) I (6 units) II (6 units) M267B Cell Biology Seminar 200 Level Elective Course (4 units) (4 units) 200 Level Elective Course (4 units) 596 Research Rotation (4 units) 596 Research Rotation (4 units) 596 Research Rotation (2 units) Second Year. By the beginning of the second year, students shall have chosen a mentor, and should now enroll in 596 Lab Research under that mentor each quarter through the third year. TA ship is not required. *In the second year, students are required to take at least one quarter of Human Genetics 282: Human Genetics Journal Club and Seminar (2 units). Fall Winter Spring 236A Advanced Human Genetics 220 Ethical Issues In Human (4 units) Genetics ( 2 units) 236B Advanced Human Genetics (4 units) 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 596 Lab Research (2-12 units) 598 Research and Preparation of 598 Research and Preparation of the Master’s Thesis (2-12 units) the Master’s Thesis (2-12 units) AY 09-10 10
    • B. Computational Human Genetics Track This schedule is just one possible pathway to complete requirements. All students must consult with Dr. Janet Sinsheimer to plan their academic schedule. First Year. One quarter of 596 should be a lab rotation in a data generating lab to get a feel for what goes in to benchwork. This can be done during the first or second year, or in the summer between the first and second year. This requirement may be waived based on evidence of extensive lab experience with department approval. Fall Winter Spring CM253 Advanced Principles of Approved Computational Human Approved Computational Human Molecular and Cellular Biosciences Genetics elective (4 units) Genetics elective (4 units) I (6 units) Approved Computational Human Approved Computational Human Stat 100A or Approved Genetics elective (4 units) Genetics elective (4 units) Computational Human Genetics elective (4 units) Approved Computational Human Genetics elective (4 units) 596 Research Rotation (2 units) 596 Research Rotation (4 units) 596 Research Rotation (4 units) Second Year. In the second year, students choose a Computational Human Genetics minor track (either Math/Statistics or Computer Science – NOT BIOLOGY) and complete three courses from the approved list. Refer to Computational Human Genetics Minor Track Courses for requirements and recommended courses. TA ship is not required. In the second year, students are required to take at least one quarter of Human Genetics 282: Human Genetics Journal Club and Seminar (2 units). Fall Winter Spring Computational Human Genetics minor 236A Advanced Human Genetics 220 Ethical Issues In Human course (4 units) (4 units) Genetics (2 units) or CM234 Ethics in Accountability in Computational Human Genetics minor Biomedical Research (2 units) course (4 units) 236B Advanced Human Genetics (4 units) Computational Human Genetics minor course (4 units) 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 282 Seminar (2 units)* 596 Lab Research (2-12 units) 598 Research and Preparation of 598 Research and Preparation of the Master’s Thesis (2-12 units) the Master’s Thesis (2-12 units) AY 09-10 11
    • REQUIRED COURSES • M207A. Theoretical Genetic Modeling. (4 units) (Same as Biomathematics M207A, Biostatistics M272, and Human Genetics M207A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: coursework equivalent to Mathematics 115A, 131A. Mathematical models in statistical genetics. Topics include population genetics, genetic epidemiology, gene mapping, design of genetics experiments, DNA sequence analysis, and molecular phylogeny. S/U or letter grading. (Fall) • M207B. Applied Genetic Modeling. (4 units) (Same as Biomathematics M207B, Biostatistics M237B, and Human Genetics M207B.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: coursework equivalent to Biostatistics 110A, 110B. Methods of computer-oriented genetic analysis. Topics may include segregation analysis, parametric and nonparametric linkage analysis, quantitative methods, and phylogenetics. Laboratory for hands-on computer analysis of genetic data; laboratory reports required. Course complements M207A; students may take either and are encouraged to take both. S/U or letter grading. (Spring when offered) • 220. Ethical Issues in Human Genetics. (2 units) Discussion, two hours. Topics include consent for genetic research, privacy of genetic information, genetic discrimination, misattribution of parentage, DNA databases, presymptomatic genetic testing, newborn screening, genetic testing of children, preimplantation diagnosis, prenatal diagnosis, manipulation of embryos and cloning, gene therapy, and forensic use of genetic information. S/U or letter grading. (Spring) • CM234. Ethics and Accountability in Biomedical Research. (2 units) (Same as Microbiology and Immunology CM234.) Designed for graduate students and undergraduates who have credit for a life sciences or biomedical individual studies 199 course. Responsibilities and ethical conduct of investigators in research, data management, mentorship, grant applications, and publications. Responsibilities to peers, sponsoring institutions, and society. Conflicts of interest, disclosure, animal subject welfare, human subject protection, and areas in which investigational goals and certain societal values may conflict. Concurrently scheduled with course C134. S/U grading. (Spring) • 236A. Advanced Human Genetics. (4 units) Lecture, three hours. Advanced topics in Human Genetics relating to Mendelian disease, molecular genetics, and relevant technologies. Topics include Cytogenetics, genomics, proteomics, positional cloning, bioinformatics, gene therapy, and developmental genetics. Letter grading. (Winter) • 236B. Advanced Human Genetics. (4 units) Lecture, three hours. Advanced topics in Human Genetics relating to complex genetics traits and common diseases. There will be an emphasis on biostatistics and mathematical modeling. Letter grading (Spring) • CM248. Molecular Genetics. (4 units) (Same as Biological Chemistry CM248, Microbiology CM248, and Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology CM248.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course CM153G or Chemistry CM153G. Molecular genetics of four systems: bacteria, yeast, Drosophila, and mouse/humans. Concurrently scheduled with course CM178. Letter grading. (No Longer Offered) AY 09-10 12
    • • CM253. Advanced Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences I (6 units) (Formerly Macromolecular Structure.) (Same as Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology CM253 and Chemistry CM253.) Lecture, five hours. Requisites: Chemistry 110A, 153A, 153B, 153C, 156. Chemical and physical properties of proteins and nucleic acids. Biosynthesis, structure, and function of proteins, nucleic acids, and multicomponent complexes; protein and nucleic acid enzymology and gene expression. Structure, cloning, and analysis of DNA; biosynthesis and processing of RNA; biosynthesis, purification, structure, and analysis of proteins; correlation of structure and biological properties. Short computer module to teach aspects of protein structure. Genetic, molecular genetic, genomic, and proteomic approaches in bacteria and yeast. Concurrently scheduled with course CM153G. Letter grading. (Fall) • CM267A. Advanced Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences II. (6 units) (Formerly Cell Biology.) (Same as Chemistry M267A and Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology CM223A.) Lecture, five hours. Requisites: Chemistry 153A, 153B, 153C. Recommended: course CM153G. Fundamental principles and experimental approaches in four areas of cell biology: cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, intracellular protein transport, and structure and function of cytoskeleton, including cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. Genetics and molecular genetics of "Drosophila" and mammals. Concurrently scheduled with course CM169. Letter grading. (Winter) • M267B. Cell Biology Seminar. (4 units) (Same as Biological Chemistry M267B, Chemistry M267B, and Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M223B.) Seminar, two hours. Corequisite: course CM267A. Student oral presentation and written analysis of primary research articles in cell biology. Letter grading. (Winter) • 282. Human Genetics Seminar and Journal Club. (2 units) Seminar, 90 minutes; discussion, 90 minutes. Limited to graduate students. Participation and presentation in weekly journal club meeting whose topics reflect one of the talks in Human Genetics Seminar Series during the following week. Attendance and production of short written report required. S/U grading. (Fall, Winter, Spring) • 375. Teaching Apprentice Practicum. (1 - 4 units) Credit for being a TA—each time the student teaches, s/he enrolls in that department’s 375 course. • 495. Preparation for Teaching. (2 units) Credit for being a TA—each time the student teaches, s/he enrolls in that department’s 495 course. • 596. Directed Individual Research in Human Genetics. (4 -12 units) S/U • 597. Preparation for M.S. Comprehensive Examination or Ph.D. Qualifying Examinations. (2 - 12 units) S/U • 598. Thesis Research for M.S. Candidates. (2 to 12 units) S/U • 599. Research for and Preparation of Ph.D. Dissertation. (4 - 12 units) S/U AY 09-10 13
    • ELECTIVE COURSES Biological Chemistry • CM233. Principles, Practices, and Policies in Biotechnology. (2 units) (Formerly numbered M233.) (Same as Biomedical Physics CM233, Chemical Engineering CM233, Chemistry CM233, Microbiology CM233, Microbiology and Immunology CM233, and Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology CM233.) Lecture, three hours. Designed for graduate students. Life and physical sciences majors and students in the School of Law and Anderson Graduate School of Management may find course useful in career preparation. Presentation of technologies, regulatory practices, and policies required for product development and review of current opportunities for new technology development. Topics include fermentation processes, pilot and large-scale bioprocess technologies, scaleup strategies, industrial recombinant DNA processes, hybridomas, protein engineering, peptide mimetics and rational drug design, medical and microscopic imaging, and intellectual property issues. Concurrently scheduled with course CM133. S/U or letter grading. (Winter) Biomathematics • M203. Stochastic Models in Biology. (4 units) (Formerly numbered 203.) (Same as Human Genetics M203.) Lecture, four hours. Requisite: Mathematics M170A or equivalent experience in probability. Mathematical description of biological relationships, with particular attention to areas where conditions for deterministic models are inadequate. Examples of stochastic models from genetics, physiology, ecology, and a variety of other biological and medical disciplines. S/U or letter grading. (Winter) • M207A. Theoretical Genetic Modeling. (4 units) (Formerly numbered 207.) (Same as Biostatistics M237A and Human Genetics M207A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: coursework equivalent to Mathematics 115A, 131A. Mathematical models in statistical genetics. Topics include population genetics, genetic epidemiology, gene mapping, design of genetics experiments, DNA sequence analysis, and molecular phylogeny. S/U or letter grading. (Spring) • M207B. Applied Genetic Modeling. (4 units) (Same as Biostatistics M237B and Human Genetics M207B.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: coursework equivalent to Biostatistics 110A, 110B. Methods of computer-oriented genetic analysis. Topics may include segregation analysis, parametric and nonparametric linkage analysis, quantitative methods, and phylogenetics. Laboratory for hands-on computer analysis of genetic data; laboratory reports required. Course complements M207A; students may take either and are encouraged to take both. S/U or letter grading. (Winter) Biostatistics • M278. Statistical Analysis of DNA Microarray (4 units) (Same as Human Genetics M278) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: Biostatistics 200C, its equivalent, or consent of the instructor. The course seeks to provide instruction in the use of statistical tools used to analyze micro-array data. We will explore data normalization, cluster analysis and prediction methods. The structure will correspond to the analytical protocol an investigator might follow when working with microarray data. The final project will give the students an opportunity to analyze a microarray data set. (Winter) AY 09-10 14
    • • M280. Statistical Computing. (4 units) (Same as Biomathematics M280 and Statistics M230.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: Mathematics 115A, Statistics 100C. Introduction to theory and design of statistical programs: computing methods for linear and nonlinear regression, dealing with constraints, robust estimation, and general maximum likelihood methods. Letter grading. (Spring) Human Genetics • M80. Genomics and the Boundaries of the Self. (5 units) (Same as Honors Collegiums 80) Lecture and discussion two hours. Study of the impact that the knowledge of the entire human genome sequence will have on our concepts of ourselves as individuals and our place in the biological universe. (Spring when offered) • CM222. Mouse Molecular Genetics. (2 units) (Same as Microbiology Immunology and Molecular Genetics M222.) Lecture, two hours. Requisite: Life Science 3, 4. Strongly recommended CM 248. Emphasis on the use of mouse genetic approach to studying fundamental biological questions. Topics include mouse genome and functional genomics, mutagenesis screening and cloning of disease genes, transgenesis and its application in developmental biology, stem cell biology, neurobiology, and modeling human genetic disorders. Reading materials include original papers and reviews. (Spring) • C244. Genomic Technologies. (4 units) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. This course surveys the key technologies that have led to the successful application of genomics in biology focusing on the theory behind specific genome-wide technologies and their current applications. (Fall) Microbiology & Immunology • M261. Molecular and Cellular Immunology. (6 units) (Same as Microbiology M261 and Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology CM261.) Lecture, four and one-half hours; discussion, 90 minutes. Requisite: Biological Chemistry. (Spring) • M294. Molecular Basis of Cancer. (4 units) (Same as Pathology M294.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: course M229, Biological Chemistry CM253, CM267, Neurobiology M209A. Fundamental biological, genetic, and molecular process involved in genesis and growth of cancer cells and diagnosis, characterization, and treatment of cancer. (Spring) Molecular, Cell & Developmental Biology • C222G. Signal Transduction by G-Protein Coupled Receptors. (2 units) Lecture, one hour; discussion, one hour. Requisites: course 100 or C139 or M140, Life Sciences 3, 4. Introduction to G-protein mediated signal transduction as used by sensory, neurotransmitter, and many hormones receptors that alter intracellular second messengers. Structure and functions of molecules that participate in signal transduction via G proteins (receptors, G proteins, effectors), with emphasis on original experiments leading to present concepts. Letter grading. (Winter) AY 09-10 15
    • • M230B. Structural Molecular Biology. (4 units) (Same as Chemistry M230B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: Mathematics 3C, Physics 6C. Selected topics from principles of biological structure; structures of globular proteins and RNAs; structures of fibrous proteins, nucleic acids, and polysaccharides; harmonic analysis and Fourier transforms; principles of electron, neutron, and X-ray diffraction; optical and computer filtering; three- dimensional reconstruction. S/U or letter grading. (Winter) Molecular & Medical Pharmacology • 288. Gene Therapy. (4 units) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to basic concepts of gene therapy, wherein treatment of human disease is based on transfer of genetic material into an individual. Molecular basis of disease, gene delivery vectors, and animal models. Letter grading. (Spring) Neuroscience • M204. Cellular and Molecular Developmental Neurobiology. (4 units) (Same as Neurobiology M204, Physiology M204, and Psychiatry M204.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses M201, M202, and M203, or Biological Chemistry 201A-201B. Cellular and molecular processes that regulate development of nervous systems of vertebrates and invertebrates. Topics include regional specification in early neurogenesis, generation of neuronal diversity, cell surface interactions and growth factors, neuronal and glial proliferation and migration, axonal outgrowth and guidance, synaptogenesis, trophic interaction, plasticity, regeneration, and aging. (Winter) Pathology and Laboratory Medicine • 255. Mapping the Human Genome. (3 units) Lecture, 90 minutes; discussion, 90 minutes. Basic molecular genetic and cytogenetic techniques of gene mapping. Selected regions of human genomic map scrutinized in detail, particularly gene families and clusters of genes that have remained linked from mouse to human. Discussion of localizations of disease genes. S/U or letter grading. (Spring) Physiology • M210. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Neural Integration. (5 units) (Same as Neuroscience M230 and Physiological Science M210.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 10 hours. Requisite: course M209A or Neuroscience M202. Introduction to mechanisms of synaptic processing. Selected problems of current interest, including regulation and modulation of transmitter release, molecular biology and physiology of receptors, cellular basis of integration in sensory perception and learning, neural nets and oscillators, and molecular events in development and sexual differentiation. (Spring) Physiological Science • M227. Cellular, Molecular, and Functional Aspects of Reproductive System. (4 units) (Same as Neurobiology M227.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Didactic presentations and discussion of developmental, anatomical/histological, physiological, cellular, and molecular aspects of reproductive system and functional integration of neuroendocrine- reproductive axis. (Spring) AY 09-10 16
    • Computational Human Genetics Minor Track Courses Computer Science Track (2) • CS 130. Software Engineering. (4) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisite: course 32. Structured programming, program specification, program proving, modularity, abstract data types, composite design, software tools, software control systems, program testing, team programming. Letter grading. • CS133. Parallel and Distributed Computing. (4) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: courses 111 (may be taken concurrently), 131. Distributed memory and shared memory parallel architectures; asynchronous parallel languages: MPI, Maisie; primitives for parallel computation: specification of parallelism, interprocess communication and synchronization; design of parallel programs for scientific computation and distributed systems. Letter grading. • CS143. Introduction to Database Systems. (4) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, four hours. Requisite: course 32. Information systems and database systems in enterprises. File organization and secondary storage structures. Relational model and relational database systems. CODASYL and other data management approaches. Database design principles. Transactions, concurrency, and recovery. Integrity and authorization. Letter grading. • CS 170A. Introduction to Scientific Computing. (4) Lecture, four hours; laboratory, two hours; outside study, six hours. Designed for senior Computer Science majors. Introduction to scientific modeling and simulation, using the very high-level computer languages MATHEMATICA and MAPLE. Extensive coverage of programming in MATHEMATICA, with applications involving engineering modeling; simulation term project required. Letter grading. • CS180. Introduction to Algorithms and Complexity. (4) Lecture, four hours; discussion, two hours; outside study, six hours. Requisites: course 32, Mathematics 61. Limited to junior/senior Computer Science majors. Introduction to design and analysis of algorithms. Design techniques: divide-and-conquer, greedy method, dynamic programming; selection of prototypical algorithms; choice of data structures and representations; complexity measures: time, space, upper, lower bounds, asymptotic complexity; NP-completeness. Letter grading. • CS M196B. Modeling and Simulation of Biological Systems. (5) (Same as Medicine M196B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, two hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: Electrical Engineering 102 or Mathematics 115A. Introduction to dynamic system modeling, compartmental modeling, and computer simulation methods for studying biomedical systems. Basics of numerical simulation algorithms, translating biomodeling goals and data into mathematic models and implementing them for simulation and analysis. Modeling software exploited for class assignments in PC laboratory. Letter grading. • CS 240A. Databases and Knowledge Bases. (4) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 143. Theoretical and technological foundation of Intelligent Database Systems, which merge database technology, knowledge-based systems, and advanced programming environments. Rule-based knowledge representation, spatio-temporal reasoning, and logic-based declarative querying/programming are salient features of this technology. Letter grading. AY 09-10 17
    • • CS 241A. Object-Oriented and Semantic Database Systems. (4) Lecture, three and one-half hours; recitation, 30 minutes; laboratory, one hour; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 143. Object and database principles. Data models and accessing. Database systems architecture and functional components. Extended relational systems. Object and semantic systems. Systems comparison. Database design, organization, indexing, and performance. Other topics at discretion of instructor. Letter grading. • CS 262A. Reasoning with Partial Beliefs. (4) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 112 or Electrical Engineering 131A. Review of several formalisms for representing and managing uncertainty in reasoning systems; presentation of comprehensive description of Bayesian inference using belief networks representation. S/U or letter grading. • CS 262B. Knowledge-Based Systems. (4) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 262A. Machine representation of judgmental knowledge and uncertain relationships. Inference on inexact knowledge bases. Rule-based systems -- principles, advantages, and limitations. Signal understanding. Automated planning systems. Knowledge acquisition and explanation producing techniques. S/U or letter grading. • CS 262C. Computer Methods of Data Analysis and Model Formation. (4) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 112. Techniques of using computers to interpret, summarize, and form theories of empirical observations. Mathematical analysis of trade-offs between computational complexity, storage requirements, and precision of computerized models. S/U or letter grading. • CS 280A-280ZZ. Algorithms. (4 each) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course 180. Additional requisites for each offering announced in advance by department. Selections from design, analysis, optimization, and implementation of algorithms; computational complexity and general theory of algorithms; algorithms for particular application areas. Subtitles of some current sections: Principles of Design and Analysis (280A); Distributed Algorithms (280D); Graphs and Networks (280G). May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor and with topic change. Letter grading. • CS M296A. Modeling Methodology for Biomedical Systems. (4) (Same as Medicine M270C.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Recommended preparation: course M196B, some intermediate knowledge of linear systems analysis or linear algebra (e.g., Mathematics 115A, Electrical Engineering 141, 142, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 171A). Development of dynamic systems modeling methodology for physiological, biomedical, pharmacological, chemical, and related systems, including dynamic system experiment/model development, multicompartmental, noncompartmental, and input/output models, linear and nonlinear. Emphasis on model applications, limitations, and relevance in biomedical sciences and other limited data environments. Problem solving in PC laboratory. S/U or letter grading. • CS M296B. Optimal Parameter Estimation and Experiment Design for Biomedical Systems. (4) (Same as Biomathematics M270 and Medicine M270D.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M296A. Estimation methodology and model parameter estimation algorithms for quantifying (fitting) dynamic system models to real-world data. Theory and algorithms for designing optimal experiments for developing and quantifying models, with special focus on data sampling schedule design. Exploration in PC laboratory of applications software for model building and optimal experiment design. S/U or letter grading. AY 09-10 18
    • • CS M296C. Advanced Topics and Research in Biomedical Systems Modeling and Computing. (4) (Same as Medicine M270E.) Lecture, four hours; outside study, eight hours. Requisite: course M296A. Research techniques and experience on special topics involving models, modeling methods, and model/computing in biological and medical sciences. Review and critique of the literature. Research problem searching and formulation. Approaches to solutions. Individual M.S.- and Ph.D.-level project training. S/U or letter grading. • Math 60. (Program In Computing) Data Structures and Algorithms. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, five hours. Enforced requisites: course 10B, Mathematics 31A, 31B, 61. Review of basic data structures: arrays, stacks, queues, lists, trees. Advanced data structures: priority queues, heaps, balanced trees. Sorting, searching techniques. Corresponding algorithms. • Math 110 (Program In Computing). Parallel and Distributed Computing. (5) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours; laboratory, eight hours. Requisite: course 10B or equivalent familiarity with programming in C or C ++ language. Introduction to programming of parallel computers. Shared and distributed memory parallel architectures; currently available parallel machines; parallel algorithms and program development; estimation of algorithmic performance; distributed computing; selected advanced topics. • Math 270A. Techniques of Scientific Computing. Mathematical modeling for computer applications, scientific programming languages, software development, graphics, implementation of numerical algorithms on different architectures, case studies. Mathematics/Statistics Track (3) • Human Genetics M203. Stochastic Models in Biology. (4) (Same as Biomathematics M203.) Lecture, four hours. Requisite: Mathematics M170A or equivalent experience in probability. Mathematical description of biological relationships, with particular attention to areas where conditions for deterministic models are inadequate. Examples of stochastic models from genetics, physiology, ecology, and a variety of other biological and medical disciplines. S/U or letter grading. • Human Genetics M207A. Theoretical Genetic Modeling . (4) (Same as Biomathematics M207A and Biostatistics M237A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: coursework equivalent to Mathematics 115A, 131A. Mathematical models in statistical genetics. Topics include population genetics, genetic epidemiology, gene mapping, design of genetics experiments, DNA sequence analysis, and molecular phylogeny. S/U or letter grading. • Human Genetics M207B. Applied Genetic Modeling . (4) (Same as Biomathematics M207B and Biostatistics M237B.) Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Preparation: coursework equivalent to Biostatistics 110A, 110B. Methods of computer-oriented genetic analysis. Topics may include segregation analysis, parametric and nonparametric linkage analysis, quantitative methods, and phylogenetics. Laboratory for hands-on computer analysis of genetic data; laboratory reports required. Course complements M207A; students may take either and are encouraged to take both. S/U or letter grading. AY 09-10 19
    • • Biomath M234. Applied Bayesian Inference. (4) (Same as Biostatistics M234.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; laboratory, one hour. Requisites: Biostatistics 115 or Statistics 100C, 200A. Bayesian approach to statistical inference, with emphasis on biomedical applications and concepts rather than mathematical theory. Topics include large sample Bayes inference from likelihoods, noninformative and conjugate priors, empirical Bayes, Bayesian approaches to linear and nonlinear regression, model selection, Bayesian hypothesis testing, and numerical methods. S/U or letter grading. • Biomath M280. Statistical Computing. (4) (Same as Biostatistics M280 and Statistics M230.) Lecture, three hours. Requisites: Mathematics 115A, Statistics 100C. Introduction to theory and design of statistical programs: computing methods for linear and nonlinear regression, dealing with constraints, robust estimation, and general maximum likelihood methods. Letter grading. • Math 113. Combinatorics. (4) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 32B, 33B. Permutations and combinations, counting principles, recurrence relations and generating functions, combinatorial designs, graphs and trees, with applications including games of complete information. Combinatorial existence theorems, Ramsey theorem. • Math M170A. Probability Theory. (4) (Formerly numbered M150A.) (Same as Statistics M100A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: courses 32B, 33B. Not open to students with credit for Statistics M100A, 110A, or Electrical Engineering 131A. Probability distributions, random variables and vectors, expectation, normal approximations. P/NP or letter grading. • Math 170B. Probability Theory. (4) (Formerly numbered 150B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course M170A or Statistics M100A. Convergence in distribution, normal approximation, laws of large numbers, Poisson processes, random walks. • Math 171. Stochastic Processes. (4) (Formerly numbered 151.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course M170A or Statistics M100A. Discrete Markov chains, continuous-time Markov chains, renewal theory. • Statistics M100A. Probability Theory. (4) (Formerly numbered M152A.) (Same as Mathematics M170A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: Mathematics 32B, 33B. Not open to students with credit for course 110A, Mathematics M170A, or Electrical Engineering 131A. Probability distributions, random variables and vectors, expectation, normal approximations. P/NP or letter grading. • Statistics 100B. Statistics . (4) (Formerly numbered 152B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course M100A. Not open to students with credit for courses 110A-110B. Survey sampling, estimation, testing, data summary, one- and two-sample problems. P/NP or letter grading. • Statistics 100C. Statistics . (4) (Formerly numbered 152C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 100B. Not open to students with credit for courses 110A-110B. Analysis of variance, categorical data, linear regression, decision theory and Bayesian inference. P/NP or letter grading. AY 09-10 20
    • • Statistics 110A. Statistics . (4) (Formerly numbered 154A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: Mathematics 32B, 33B. Not open to students with credit for course M100A, Mathematics M170A, or Electrical Engineering 131A. Probability, distributions, expectation, estimation, central limit theorem, confidence intervals, testing. P/NP or letter grading. • Statistics 110B. Statistics . (4) (Formerly numbered 154B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 110A. Not open to students with credit for courses M100A and 100B. One- and two-sample problems, goodness of fit and contingency tables, correlation and regression, analysis of variance, nonparametrics. P/NP or letter grading. • Statistics M120A. Regression Analysis. (4) (Formerly numbered M153A.) (Same as Biomathematics M153A and Biostatistics M153A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: course 100B, Mathematics 115A. Linear and nonlinear regression analysis using package programs. Emphasis on relation between statistical theory, numerical results, and analysis of data. BMDP, SAS, and SPSS regression programs; general linear model theory; linear regression analysis; transforming and weighting; regression diagnostics; model building. P/NP or letter grading. • Statistics M120B. Regression Analysis. (4) (Formerly numbered M153B.) (Same as Biomathematics M153B and Biostatistics M153B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: course 100B, Mathematics 115A. Linear and nonlinear regression analysis using package programs. Emphasis on relation between statistical theory, numerical results, and analysis of data. Analysis of variance and covariance; nonlinear regression programs, analysis, and applications; maximum likelihood analysis; robust regression. P/NP or letter grading. AY 09-10 21
    • SEMINARS Biological Chemistry • 251A-251B-251C. Seminars: Transcriptional Regulation. (2 units each) Advanced courses on mechanics of gene transcription in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes intended for students actively working or highly interested in transcription. S/U grading. (Fall/Winter/Spring) • M266A-M266B-M266C. Seminars: Molecular Embryology. (2 units each) (Same as Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology M266A-M266B-M266C.) Advanced course in developmental genetics and biochemistry, with emphasis on early development. Intended mostly for students actively working or highly interested in embryology. S/U grading. (Fall/Winter/Spring) Microbiology and Immunology • M262A. Seminar: Current Topics in Immunobiology of Cancer. (2 units) (Same as Microbiology M262A.) Review of recent literature in immunology, biology, and biochemistry of cancer, with emphasis on fundamental studies involving cell-mediated immunity, humoral response, tumor specific antigens, and new techniques. Discussion of reports on scientific meetings. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading. (Spring) Microbiology and Molecular Genetics • 242. Seminar: Microbial Molecular Genetics. (2 units) Student and instructor presentations and critical discussion of newly emerging concepts in prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic molecular genetics. Emphasis on nature of the gene and control of gene expression. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading. (Fall/Winter) • 250. Seminar: Microbial Metabolism. (2 units) Discussion and student presentations of recent work in areas of genetic regulation and physiology of bacterial metabolism. (Fall/Spring) • M262A. Seminar: Current Topics in Immunobiology of Cancer. (2 units) (Same as Microbiology and Immunology M262A.) Review of recent literature in immunology, biology, and biochemistry of cancer, with emphasis on fundamental studies involving cell-mediated immunity, humoral response, tumor specific antigens, and new techniques. Discussion of reports on scientific meetings. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading. (Winter/Spring) • 270. Seminar: Molecular Virology. (2 units) Designed for graduate students. Discussion and student presentations of recent work in molecular virology, including viral gene expression and function. S/U grading. (Fall/Winter/Spring) • 290. Seminar: Molecular Genetics. (2 units) Seminar, one hour; discussion, one hour. Designed for graduate students. Discussion and student presentations of recent work in molecular and genetic analysis of cellular gene regulation. S/U grading. (Spring) AY 09-10 22
    • Molecular Biology • 297. Seminar: Molecular and Cellular Life Sciences. (2 units) In-depth surveys of recent developments in specific fields of life sciences research. By reading and presenting primary research articles, students learn to critically evaluate research papers and organize and present a seminar on a specific research topic. S/U or letter grading. (Fall/Winter/Spring) • 298. Seminar: Current Topics in Molecular Biology. (2 units) (Formerly numbered M298.) Students conduct and participate in discussions on assigned topics. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading. (Fall/Winter/Spring) Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology • M266A-M266B-M266C. Seminars: Molecular Embryology. (2 units each) (Same as Biological Chemistry M266A-M266B-M266C.) Advanced course in developmental genetics and biochemistry, with emphasis on early development. Intended mostly for students actively working or highly interested in embryology. S/U grading. (Fall/Winter/Spring) • 276. Seminar: Molecular Genetics. (2 units) Topics vary each term. (Fall/Winter) Neurobiology • M270A-M270B-M270C. Cell, Molecular, and Integrative Biology Seminars. (2 units each) (Same as Physiology M270A-M270B-M270C.) Seminar, one hour; discussion, one hour. Designed for graduate students. Presentation of weekly seminars and discussion on current topics in cell and molecular biology by faculty members from Neurobiology, Physiology, and other UCLA departments, in addition to invited lecturers. S/U grading. (Fall/Winter/Spring) Organismic Biology, Ecology and Evolution • 263. Seminar: Population Genetics. (2 or 4 units) Discussion, three to six hours. Seminar on topics of current interest in population genetics, such as kin selection, sociobiology, cultural evolution, conservation genetics, etc. (Winter) Pathology and Laboratory Medicine • 298A-298B-298C. Current Research in Disease Mechanisms. (2 units each) Seminar, 90 minutes. Preparation: one course each in molecular biology, cell biology, and biological chemistry. Designed for graduate experimental pathology students. Current research in disease mechanisms, with strong emphasis on experimental approach in pathology. Topics include genetic and metabolic disorders, thyroid disease, immunology, atherosclerosis, infectious diseases, and Alzheimer's disease. (Fall/Winter/Spring) Physiological Science • M295A-M295B. Seminars: Cellular Neuroscience. (2 - 4 units each) (Same as Neuroscience M266A-M266B-M266C.) Requisite: course M202. Selected topics in sensory transduction, cellular integration, synaptic processing, central nervous system function, and learning. Students required to present two-hour seminar. (Fall/Winter) 297. Seminar: Muscle Cell Biology. (2 – 4 units) (Formerly numbered 297A-297B-297C.) Seminar, two hours. Selected topics in muscle cell biology. Students required to present two-hour seminar. May be repeated for credit. (Winter) AY 09-10 23
    • * * * * * * Supplemental Educational Activities In addition to the courses and seminars described above, the Department of Human Genetics organizes the following activities in which all graduate students should participate: Monday Seminar Series These weekly meetings occur every Monday from 11:30 to 12:30 PM in the Gonda (first floor) conference room. Guest speakers are invited by department faculty to share the latest scientific information in their field. Statistical Genetics Round Table This monthly meeting brings together our large, expert statistical genetics group to hear a short, informal presentation on a problem area in a current research project, by a local or invited colleague. We then discuss possible solutions to the problem. Research collaborations often result. Bioinformatics Special Interest Group This monthly meeting discusses practical, hands-on questions on how to use available systems for Bioinformatics research. At each meeting appropriate news items are announced, there is a brief presentation of a new technique, and then attendees ask practical questions on specific tasks, and get advice from the rest of the attendees. Human Genetics Journal Club Journal Club will be held in conjunction with the Monday Seminar Series. Graduate Students will present 1-2 recently published papers related to the Monday speaker’s research. Stats Club Stats Club is a weekly seminar/journal club that meets on Friday mornings from 10-11am. It is an informal meeting where we gather to discuss original research loosely centered on statistical genetics, genomics, gene expression, bioinformatics and related topics. The goal of this meeting is to teach each other about current research in this field. We are lucky to have regular attendance from professors, post-docs and students with both statistical and biological backgrounds. Each week features a presentation by a different Stat Club member or an invited speaker. We have very interactive discussion. If you are interested in being added to the email list please contact me, Casey Romanoski, at casey.romanoski@ucla.edu. AY 09-10 24
    • 2009-2010 GRADUATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS The Department of Human Genetics offers the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in Human Genetics. Master's Degree Admission The department accepts students into the M.S. program only rarely and under special circumstances. Advising A student entering the master's program is expected to identify a faculty mentor to serve as adviser for the student. If no faculty mentor is identified by the student, the departmental graduate adviser serves as the adviser. Areas of Study Areas of study include human genetics and related areas (for example, molecular genetics, mathematical modeling). Consult the department for additional information. Foreign Language Requirement None. Course Requirements There are two curricular tracks for master's degree students. Those pursuing laboratory research as part of their training take similar core courses in the first year as doctoral students (see under Doctoral Degree). Students focused on biomathematics and statistical modeling in human genetics may substitute advanced courses in biomathematics for more biologically oriented courses. In addition, all master's students must take the advanced human genetics course (Human Genetics 236) and the ethics in human genetics course (Human Genetics 220). Elective courses must be taken to complete the minimum 36 units required for the master's degree. No more than two independent study courses (eight units) in the 500 series may be applied toward the minimum course requirement for the master's degree, and only one of these (four units) may be applied toward the minimum graduate course requirement for the degree. Teaching Experience Not required. Field Experience Not required. Thesis Plan A written thesis is required for master's degree students who are pursuing the laboratory research track in addition to course work. A thesis committee composed of at least three faculty members helps the student to plan the thesis research and makes a recommendation on granting the terminal degree. If the first thesis submitted to the committee is unacceptable, the committee decides whether the student is granted additional time to revise and resubmit the thesis. Time-to-Degree Students are expected to complete the requirements for the master's degree within six quarters. AY 09-10 25
    • Doctoral Degree Admission Doctoral students generally are admitted to the program through UCLA ACCESS to Programs in the Molecular and Cellular Life Sciences. Information may be obtained from UCLA ACCESS, 172 MBI, UCLA, Box 951570, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1570, (310)206- 605, www.uclaaccess.ucla.edu, or email uclaaccess@mednet.ucla.edu. The department may also admit students directly into the doctoral training program during the first year in special cases. Undergraduate requirements for the Ph.D. program are similar to those of ACCESS. These requirements include a bachelor's degree, with preparation in physics, biology and chemistry, and exposure through upper division courses in specific areas that may include: genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, cell biology, developmental biology, microbiology, virology, physiology, and immunology. Because of the high mathematical content of some areas of human genetics, advanced courses in mathematics may be substituted for biologically oriented courses. More advanced degrees (M.S., M.D. or equivalent) are also acceptable. The GRE general test, three letters of recommendation and a statement of purpose are required. The GRE subject test is recommended. International applicants whose first language is not English must take and submit a score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and are encouraged to take and submit a score on the Test of Spoken English (TSE). Applicants who are interested in the M.D./Ph.D. Program apply by submitting simultaneous applications to the UCLA School of Medicine and the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). Information regarding the MSTP program may be obtained by calling (310) 794- 1817 or by email to mstp@mednet.ucla.edu. Acceptance by both programs is necessary. Some common course work between these programs means that the degrees can be completed together in somewhat less time than when completed separately. Advising The department's Graduate Advisor (appointed by the chair) is the advisor for students who have not yet selected a laboratory for their doctoral studies. After the first year, all Ph.D. students, whether coming through ACCESS or directly into the department, select a faculty mentor, who automatically becomes the student's adviser. A doctoral committee is constituted by the end of the second year, and its members act as additional advisers. Students are expected to meet with that committee at least once a year until graduation. Major Fields or Subdisciplines The field of human genetics is a discipline which includes genomics, cytogenetics, biochemical and molecular genetics, medical genetics, immunogenetics, cancer genetics, developmental genetics, population genetics, and bioinformatics. Studies of animal models are also an essential part of Human Genetics. Foreign Language Requirement None. Course Requirements Students entering the program through ACCESS follow ACCESS course requirements in the first year. In the fall quarter, students take Advanced Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences I, CM253, which provides grounding in the chemical and biological properties AY 09-10 26
    • of nucleic acids and proteins. In the winter quarter, students select CM267A, Advanced Principles of Molecular and Callular Biosciences II, and M267B, Cell Biology Seminar. These courses emphasize cellular function and organization. Knowledge of nucleic acid and protein structure and function and cell biology is essential for genetics. In the spring quarter, as part of the ACCESS program during the first year, students also take a course on ethics in research, and Ethics and Accountability in Biomedical Research CM234 is recommended. The Human Genetics faculty offers at least one seminar course in the field of human genetics. Human Genetics 220 Ethics in Human Genetics, and 236A and 236B Advanced Human Genetics are required of pre-doctoral students in Human Genetics, preferably during the second year of training. These courses must be taken for a letter grade. Six additional units of coursework are required for the doctoral degree, preferably in seminar format. Students that enter the department directly have a choice between two tracks: 1) a laboratory track, which has similar course requirements as the ACCESS program, and 2) a bioinformatics track, which course requirements includes Macromolecular Structure and Function, Applied Genetic Modeling, Molecular Genetics, Advanced Human Genetics, and two Bioinformatics Math/Statistics or Computer Science minor courses. Teaching Experience Students who enter Human Genetics through ACCESS teach for two quarters, at least once as a teaching assistant in a science department of the College of Letters and Science while the other teaching may be in the College or in one of the basic science laboratory courses of the School of Medicine. The teaching is to be performed in years two and three. Students who enter the department directly are required to teach for a minimum of one quarter. Students are encouraged to teach in Life Sciences 4 (the genetics component of the Life Sciences Core Curriculum) as teaching a general course in genetics reinforces understanding of fundamental aspects of the field. The area chosen for the second teaching obligation (if required) depends on student interest and departmental opportunities. Written and Oral Qualifying Examinations Students are allowed to nominate a doctoral committee after satisfactory performance in courses and laboratory rotations, as judged by faculty or a designated faculty committee. The University Oral Qualifying Examination must be passed before students are advanced to candidacy for the doctoral degree. This examination is administered in two parts by a doctoral committee composed of at least four faculty members selected by the student and approved by the department. Before advancement to candidacy, two short written research proposals are prepared and must be successfully defended orally by the student. The proposal must include the scientific rationale, experimental methods, anticipated results and interpretations, and bibliography. Proposal 1 is an original proposal formulated by the student on a topic in human genetics that is not directly related to the proposed dissertation research. It is to be completed by the end of the second year of training or, at the latest, at the beginning of year three. The second proposal covers the dissertation research and is to be completed by the end of year three. Students are evaluated on their understanding of the research they are undertaking for the dissertation, on their ability to identify an important scientific problem independently of their mentors, on their ability to devise appropriate and original experimental strategies, and on their ability to write clearly and concisely. For both proposals, the oral examination occurs a week or two after submission of the written proposal. The oral examination consists of a discussion of the proposals and of additional questions that probe the student's general knowledge and understanding of human genetics. AY 09-10 27
    • The doctoral committee determines whether the student passes the examinations and advances to candidacy. The committee also determines whether a student who fails the examination is allowed to repeat it. If re-examination is allowed, the student is allowed to repeat the examination only once and this must be completed by the end of the next academic quarter. A student must successfully complete the written and oral qualifying examinations prior to beginning the fourth year of graduate study. Advancement to Candidacy Students are advanced to candidacy upon satisfactory completion of the written and oral qualifying examinations. Final Oral Examination (Defense of Dissertation) Required for all students in the program. Time-to-Degree The time from entry into the program to completion of the doctorate is expected to be approximately 5 years. Termination of Graduate Study and Appeal of Termination University Policy A student who fails to meet the above requirements may be recommended for termination of graduate study. A graduate student may be disqualified from continuing in the graduate program for a variety of reasons. The most common is failure to maintain the minimum cumulative grade point average (3.00) required by the Academic Senate to remain in good standing (some programs require a higher grade point average). Other examples include failure of examinations, lack of timely progress toward the degree and poor performance in core courses. Probationary students (those with cumulative grade point averages below 3.00) are subject to immediate dismissal upon the recommendation of their department. University guidelines governing termination of graduate students, including the appeal procedure, are outlined in Standards and Procedures for Graduate Study at UCLA. Special Departmental or Program Policy None. AY 09-10 28
    • HYPOTHETICAL, NON-HYPOTHETICAL, AND ORAL EXAMINATIONS Students are required to prepare two short research proposals broadly related to the field of human genetics. The first should be a written research proposal unrelated to the thesis project, and should be submitted before the end of the spring quarter of the 2nd year. An oral defense of the proposal before the student’s doctoral committee will follow two weeks later. This will constitute the Oral Preliminary Exam (Hypothetical). Students must submit the doctoral committee nomination form at least three weeks prior to submitting the written research proposal to the committee. The appropriate forms can be obtained from the Department. The second proposal should be submitted before the end of spring quarter of the 3rd year. This written research proposal should cover the student’s thesis project. An oral defense of the proposal before the student’s doctoral committee will follow two weeks after the written proposal is submitted and will constitute the Oral Qualifying Exam (Non-Hypothetical). With the completion of course requirements, this will fulfill the requirements for Advancement to Candidacy. Written Proposal Each proposal should consist of not less than eight and not more than ten single-spaced pages (excluding references), and copies should be distributed to the doctoral committee member’s two weeks before the oral exam. Each written proposal must include specific aims, the scientific rationale, experimental methods, anticipated results and interpretations, potential future directions, and bibliography. Students will be evaluated on their understanding of the proposed research, on their ability to devise appropriate and original experimental strategies, and on their ability to write clearly and concisely. Students are encouraged to discuss the proposals with the thesis advisor and other members of the lab, but should write the proposals independently. Criticism of the written proposals may be sought from anyone except the thesis advisor. Oral Exam The oral exams are directed towards evaluating the student’s understanding of the projects. With respect to the thesis proposal, this understanding should extend to the background that forms the basis for the thesis project, the rationale behind the experimental plans, potential logical or technical weaknesses in the experimental approaches, alternative approaches that might address the weaknesses, interpretation of possible results, and significance of those results. Note: This is an exam of the student, not the thesis project. It is not the committee’s goal or responsibility to determine the value of the project (this would be the subject of thesis committee meetings after the student has passed the oral exam). It is the committee’s task to establish that the student has an extensive knowledge of the field of research relevant to the thesis work, and a fundamental grasp of the rationale and significance of the project and the experimental approaches necessary to carry out the research. The hypothetical proposal will be subject to the same criteria, plus the student will be responsible for defending the value of the project. To qualify as distinct from the thesis proposal, the hypothetical proposal should be unrelated to the research focus in the thesis proposal and other projects in the thesis advisor’s lab. AY 09-10 29
    • The length of each oral exam is approximately two hours. The actual presentation by the student is typically 45 to 50 minutes. “General knowledge” will be assessed while discussing each proposal, so the exam does not require a distinct amount of time for this. Advancement to Candidacy and Subsequent Committee Meetings Students are advanced to candidacy following satisfactory completion of course requirements and the written and oral qualifying examinations. Advancement occurs when a successful “Report on the Qualifying Oral Exam” is received by the Graduate Division. Students are responsible for the $90.00 fee that is billed to your BAR Account. Once students pass the Oral Qualifying Exam, the student should schedule an annual meeting (Midstream) with the thesis committee so that the committee can assess the student’s progress and provide advice. At each meeting, the student should take 20-30 minutes to present the status of the thesis work, including both positive and negative results. During the 4th year, the student schedules and presents a department seminar based on his/her thesis research. This will replace the thesis committee meeting for that year. Timely Progress to Degree As a policy of the department students are required to meet with their thesis committee at a minimum of once per year for one of the above mentioned exams or to discuss the progress of student’s degree requirements. It is the responsibility of the student to set up these meetings and report them to the SAO and GSA after they have taken place. Failure to comply with the time schedule described herein may result in disqualification from the Ph.D. program unless permission to the contrary has been granted by the Graduate Student Advisor. Decision to advance the student to candidacy, to allow a student to repeat the oral, or to disqualify a student will be based on the quality of the written proposal, the adequacy of the oral presentation, the student’s overall academic record as reflected in coursework and examinations, and the student’s research ability and productivity. AY 09-10 30
    • PREPARING FOR ORALS Preparing for the Oral Preliminary Exam: 1. Obtain a “Nomination of Doctoral Committee” worksheet from HG graduate affairs office. 2. Select at least four committee members (see requirements on back of form). 3. Return completed worksheet to graduate affairs office at least three weeks before the date of the first oral exam. . 4. Await approval of the committee from the Graduate Division. The exam cannot take place until the committee has been approved by the Graduate Division. 5. Schedule the exam. Coordinate a time with the committee members and reserve a room (see the Student Affairs Officer). 6. It is strongly suggested that the student remind the committee members one or two days before the exam. The exam cannot proceed if any members are not present at the exam. 7. The SAO prepares the student’s academic file, including the “Report on the Oral Preliminary Exam” form, to be signed by committee members after the exam and returned to the SAO. Preparing for the Oral Qualifying Exam 1. If changes to the committee membership are needed, a “Reconstitution of Doctoral Committee” form must be completed, signed by committee members and submitted to Graduate Division for approval. The Graduate Division requires at least three weeks to process these changes. See SAO for forms and assistance. 2. Coordinate a date/time with the committee members. Notify the SAO of the date/time of the exam has soon as one is proposed. The SAO will help you reserve a room. It is strongly suggested that the student remind the committee members one or two days before the exam. The Oral Qualifying Exam is open to committee members and the student only. 3. The SAO prepares the student’s academic file, including the “Report on the Oral Qualifying Exam” form, to be signed by committee members after the exam and returned to the SAO. After the Oral Qualifying Exam (2nd exam) 1. The Report on the Qualifying Examination will be forwarded to Graduate Division by the SAO. 2. The student “advances to candidacy” when a successful “Report on the Oral Qualifying Exam” is received and processed by the Graduate Division. A $90.00 fee will be billed to your BAR Account (in two charges of $45.00). Students are responsible for this fee. Oral Defense – Required. See Graduate Student Advisor for details. AY 09-10 31
    • HUMAN GENETICS GRADUATE PROGRAM Summary of Events, Milestones, Things to Do, and Such FIRST YEAR Fall September: Attend orientation. Meet with the Student Affairs Officer. October: Meet with the Graduate Student Advisor. Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! Attend Human Genetics Annual Academic Retreat Winter January: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! Masters Students select Master’s Thesis Committee Spring April: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! June: Choose faculty mentor and thesis laboratory; discuss the selection with the Graduate Student Advisor. A mutual agreement form must be signed by the student, faculty mentor and GSA by the end of the Spring quarter. Summer August: Meet with Graduate Student Advisor. SECOND YEAR Fall September: Attend orientation. Meet with Personal Investigator/Student Affairs Officer. October: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! Attend Human Genetics Annual Academic Retreat/Consider a Poster Presentation Winter January: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! Spring April: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! Select a doctoral committee in conjunction with mentor. File appropriate forms with Graduate Division. June: Hypothetical Exam should be taken by the end of the Spring quarter. Masters Students take Qualifying Exam by end of Spring quarter Summer August: Meet with Graduate Student Advisor Masters Students file Thesis THIRD YEAR Fall September: Attend orientation. Meet with Personal Investigator/Student Affairs Officer. October: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! Present at Human Genetics Annual Academic Retreat Poster/Oral Presentation AY 09-10 32
    • Winter January: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! Spring April: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! Qualifying Exam is taken by the end of the Spring Quarter. June: Advance to candidacy!! Summer August Meet with the Graduate Student Advisor. FOURTH YEAR Fall September: Attend orientation. Meet with Personal Investigator/Student Affairs Officer. October: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! Attend and Present at the Human Genetics Annual Academic Retreat Winter January: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! March: Present a departmental seminar on the progress of your dissertation work. Spring April: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! Schedule a meeting with Doctoral Committee to discuss progress to degree. Summer August Meet with Graduate Student Advisor. FIFTH YEAR Fall September: Attend orientation. Meet with Personal Investigator/Student Affairs Officer. October: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! Attend and Present (if not done so already) at the Human Genetics Annual Academic Retreat Winter January: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! Spring April: Enroll in classes (12 units) by the second week of classes to avoid late fees! May: Complete dissertation June: Defend Thesis Attend Hooding Ceremony and Department Graduation Celebration Graduate!! AY 09-10 33
    • Academic and Administrative Calendars 2009 to 2010 Independence Day holiday Friday, July 3 Labor Day holiday Monday, September 7 Fall Quarter 2009 Quarter begins Monday, September 21 Instruction begins Thursday, September 24 Study List deadline Friday, October 9 Veterans Day holiday Wednesday, November 11 Thursday-Friday, November 26- Thanksgiving holiday 27 Instruction ends Friday, December 4 Common final exams Saturday-Sunday, December 5-6 Final examinations Monday-Friday, December 7-11 Quarter ends Friday, December 11 Wednesday-Thursday, December Winter Holiday – Campus Closed 19 - January 3 Wednesday – Thursday, Christmas holiday December 24 - 25 Thursday - Friday, December 31 - New Year’s holiday January 1 Winter Quarter 2010 Quarter begins Monday, January 4 Instruction begins Monday, January 4 Study List deadline Friday, January 15 Martin Luther King, Jr, holiday Monday, January 18 Presidents’ Day holiday Monday, February 15 Instruction ends Friday, March 12 Common final exams Saturday-Sunday, March 13-14 Final examinations Monday-Friday, March 15-19 Quarter ends Friday, March 19 Cesar Chavez holiday Friday, March 26 Spring Quarter 2010 Quarter begins Monday, March 29 Instruction begins Monday, March 29 Study List deadline Friday, April 9 Memorial Day holiday Monday, May 31 Instruction ends Friday, June 4 Common final exams Saturday-Sunday, June 5-6 Final examinations Monday-Friday, June 7-11 Quarter ends Friday, June 11 Commencement ceremonies Friday-Saturday, June 11-12 AY 09-10 34
    • UCLA Registrar's Office Services Open Monday through Friday 9am to 5pm. http://www.registrar.ucla.edu Student Service Contact Location Administrative Main Cashier Submit fee payments, collect Bruin Direct forms (310) 825-2201 1125 Murphy Hall Degree auditor: current-term degree candidates, ask to see Letters and Science Degree Auditors (310) 825-2754 1113 Murphy Hall Master’s/Doctoral (310) 825-2754 1113 Murphy Hall 1100 Dickson Art Arts and Architecture (310) 206-3564 Center Engineering (310) 825-2036 6426 Boelter Hall 2-200 Factor Nursing (310) 825-7181 Building 103 East Melnitz Theater, Film, and Television (310) 825-1766 Building Degree Progress Report (DPR) View and print a DPR URSA OnLine Diplomas Receive for awarded degree; request a duplicate or special order diploma (310) 825-1091 1113 Murphy Hall Enrollment Services Process restricted courses, 199s, enrollment petitions, and class level (310) 825-1091 1113 Murphy Hall corrections. Fees Receive information on approved fee reductions for part-time undergraduates; on refunds for withdrawal, dismissal, cancellation, leave of absence; or waivers for (310) 825-1091 1113 Murphy Hall late registration fee payment, enrollment petition Grades URSA Telephone Receive current and past terms grade reports/term printout URSA OnLine Inquire about procedures for grade changes or incomplete grades (310) 825-1091 1113 Murphy Hall Holds Receive details on holds initiating offices URSA OnLine URSA Telephone Personal Information Change name or social security number (forms available across from 1105 Murphy Hall) In person 1134 Murphy Hall Change address, telephone, or contact information URSA OnLine Verify privacy options (disclosure of student records) URSA OnLine 1113 Murphy Hall Readmission File an undergraduate readmission application(forms available across from 1105 Murphy Hall) (310) 825-1091 1113 Murphy Hall Registration Cancel registration or pay fees (310) 825-1091 1113 Murphy Hall URSA OnLine, URSA Verify registration fee payment Telephone Residence information for tuition purposes (310) 825-3447 1113 Murphy Hall Determine eligibility for reclassification Transcripts Request a copy of official transcripts (forms available across from 1105 Murphy (310) 825-3801 Hall) transcripts@registrar.ucla 1134 Murphy Hall .edu Verifications Confirm status of student attendance, degrees, address information, loan forms, (310) 206-0482 1134 Murphy Hall "good student" auto insurance certification Veterans Affairs (310) 825-1091 1113 Murphy Hall AY 09-10 35
    • MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION ACADEMIC RESOURCES See the General Catalog for details (http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/catalog/) ADDRESS CHANGES It is important to keep your address updated with the University. Official university mailings (including BAR statements) are sent to that address. Changes can be made on-line at http://www.ursa.ucla.edu. To change payroll address please contact department SAO. ADVISING First year students are advised by Professor Esteban Dell’Angelica, Graduate Student Advisor. Second year students are advised by their faculty mentor. BANKING University Credit Union is located on level A of Ackerman Union, 310-477-6628. BRUIN DIRECT Bruin Direct is available through the Student Accounting Office, B303 Murphy Hall, x59194. BRUINCARD The BruinCard is your official UCLA identification card. It can be obtained M-F, 9:00am – 4:00pm at 123 Kerckhoff Hall. To obtain a BruinCard, you must bring with you a picture ID (such as a driver’s license, passport, etc.). No appointment is necessary. More information about the Bruincard can be obtained by calling 825-2336 or at http://www.bruincard.ucla.edu. DISSERTATION Workshops are offered each quarter to help guide students in preparing dissertations. A detailed guide will be distributed at the workshop. Workshop dates are posted on the graduate bulletin board each quarter. Filing fee information and deadlines are available in the graduate office. DROP/ADD/CHANGE OF GRADING BASIS Drops or adds may be made without cost during the first two weeks of the quarter. After the second week, and through the last day of classes, a student may drop a non-core course for a $5 fee. During the third week, students may add a class to study lists for a $5 fee; after the third week, students may add classes to study lists for a $5 fee plus a $15 per course penalty fee with department approval. Adds, drops and change of grading basis may be done via URSA (208- 0425). E-MAIL The department will arrange to have an e-mail account set up for you, so if you have not done so yet please contact the SAO to complete the required forms. If you have an existing Bruin Online account, please inform the SAO of this. ENROLLMENT Students are required to enroll by the deadline in order to avoid the $50 late fee. (The deadline is usually the Friday of the 2nd full week of classes.) FINANCIAL AID For domestic students, GSL, Workstudy, grants, emergency loans ($75) and other loans are available at A-129J Murphy Hall, the Financial Aid Office Service Counter. Students may apply for financial aid (need based) even if supported by a Teaching or Research Assistantship. AY 09-10 36
    • HOUSING The Community Housing Office at 350 DeNeve Drive provides information and current listings on University-owned apartments, cooperatives, private apartments, roommates, rooms in private homes, room and board in exchange for work, and temporary housing. A Registration Card or letter of acceptance and a valid photo ID are required for access. Their web site is www.ha.ucla.edu INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES Dashew Center for International Students and Scholars (DCISS) is located at 106 Tom Bradley International Hall, 825-1681. KEYS Keys to labs in the Gonda Building may be obtained from the Department’s Administrative Assistant in Room 6506. Off-hours access to the Gonda Building will require programming the card key system to accept your Bruincard. Please see the Administrative Assistant for after-hours access. LIBRARY AND JOURNAL COLLECTION ROOM A collection of the some of the latest scientific journals can be found in Gonda Room 6303. MAIL AND POSTAL SERVICES Each student is assigned a mailbox in Gonda 6524B. Stamps, post office boxes, etc. can be purchased at the ASUCLA Service Center, 123 Kerckhoff Hall, x65120. ORIENTATION Department and University orientation occurs in the weeks before classes begin during Fall Quarter. Attendance is required. A Chancellor's Graduate Reception is usually given during Fall Quarter for all new graduate students. Attendance is encouraged. Any student who does not receive an invitation by the end of the first week of classes should notify the SAO. PARKING See Nancy Hards for information regarding parking permits. Additionally, UCLA Parking Services Office is located at 555 Westwood Plaza, x59871. PHOTOCOPYING and FAXING A copy machine and fax machine is available for use in Room 6524B. STUDENT ACTIVITIES, STUDENT LIFE & STUDENT SERVICES See General Catalogue for details. The Graduate Student Association (GSA) may be contacted (310) 206-8512. TRANSCRIPTS Transcripts may be obtained at the Registrar’s Office, 1134 Murphy Hall, x53801. TRAVEL SERVICE UCLA Travel Center (310) 794-2875 or (800) 235-UCLA, email travel@bafnet.ucla.edu WEB SITES www. genetics.ucla.edu → Department of Human Genetics www.registrar.ucla.edu → UCLA Registrar www.gdnet.ucla.edu → Graduate Division www.ursa.ucla.edu → University Records System AY 09-10 37
    • Who to See in the Department of Human Genetics Tiffany Comtois-Dion ⇒ When in doubt, see your Student Affairs Officer! Student Affairs Officer ⇒ Administrative actions in conjunction with Graduate 6506 Gonda Division. (310) 206-0920 ⇒ Distribution of information regarding important dates, tcomtois@mednet.ucla.edu deadlines, fellowships and grants. ⇒ Information regarding academic records, enrollment, advising, written and oral exams and financial support. ⇒ Academic apprentice appointments; payroll questions. ⇒ Scheduling conference rooms Dr. Esteban Dell’Angelica ⇒ Academic Advising Graduate Student Advisor 6357B Gonda (310) 206-6749 edellangelica@mednet.ucla.edu Nancy Hards ⇒ General Office Services Assistant to the Chair ⇒ Copy machine; fax machine nhards@mednet.ucla.edu ⇒ Gonda building access; room keys Tania Perez ⇒ Mail distribution Administrative Assistant ⇒ Parking tperez@mednet.ucla.edu 6506 Gonda (310) 794-5423 Clifford Kravit ⇒ Computing Support User Support Specialist ⇒ Troubleshooting 6558 Gonda ⇒ Bioinformatics Labs (310) 267-2453 ckravit@mednet.ucla.edu AY 09-10 38
    • Department of Human Genetics GRADUATE STUDENT ROSTER Academic Year 2009-2010 Name E-mail Address Advisor Valerie Arboleda vaa2001@ucla.edu Vilain Chaochao Cai caichaochao@ucla.edu Horvath Michael Clark Michael.james.clark@gmail.com Fan Tova Fuller suprtova@ucla.edu Horvath Negar Ghahramani Nghahramani@mednet.ucla.edu Vilain Blake Haas Bhaas@mednet.ucla.edu Pajukanta Huanhuan (Mahsa) He huanhuanhe@mednet.ucla.edu Fan Jessica Lee JessicaMLee@mednet.ucla.edu Reue Rui Luo luoruicd@gmail.com Geschwind Tuck Ngun Tnung@mednet.ucla.edu Reue Lauren O’Loughlin laurenoloughlin@gmail.com Reue Luz Orozco LDOrozco@mednet.ucla.edu Lusis Lilly Parr-Robino lsparr@ucla.edu Dipple Imilce A. Rodriguez-Fernandez IRodzfedz@mednet.ucla.edu Dell’Angelica Casey Romanoski cromanosky@ucla.edu Lusis Lin Song linsong@mednet.ucla.edu Horvath Sam Strom strom@ucla.edu Nelson Jessica Wang jessicawang@mednet.ucla.edu Lusis Michael Weinstein michael.weinstein@ucla.edu Young Su-lin Wu sulinwu@ucla.edu Lusis Michael Yourshaw myourshaw@gmail.com Nelson AY 09-10 39
    • Department of Human Genetics FACULTY ROSTER Academic Year 2009-2010 Faculty Ofc. Phone Office Lab E-mail Rita Cantor 267-2440 4506-C GC N/A rcantor@mednet.ucla.edu Stephen Cederbaum 825-0402 347 NRB N/A scederbaum@mednet.ucla.edu Daniel Cohn 423-2880 Cedars-Sinai Medical Ctr. dan.cohn@cshs.org Esteban Dell’Angelica 206-3749 6357-B GC 6554 GC edellangelica@mednet.ucla.edu Katrina Dipple 825-1997 5506-B GC 5335 GC kdipple@mednet.ucla.edu 2915-Math Sci Eleazar Eskin 825-1322 N/A eeskin@cs.ucla.edu 6309-B GC Guoping Fan 267-0439 6357 GC 6554 GC gfan@mednet.ucla.edu Richard Gatti 825-7618 4736 MRL N/A rgatti@mednet.ucla.edu Daniel Geschwind 206-6814 2506A 2309 GC dhg@ucla.edu Wayne Grody 825-5648 IP-249 CHS 1P-266 CHS wgrody@mednet.ucla.edu Steve Horvath 825-9299 4357-A GC N/A shorvath@mednet.ucla.edu Christina Jamieson 206-2597 5309-A GC 4554 GC cjamieson@mednet.ucla.edu Julie Korenberg 423-7627 Cedars-Sinai Medical Ctr. julie.korenberg@cshs.org Deborah Krakow 423-6460 Cedars-Sinai Medical Ctr. deborah.krakow@cshs.org James Lake 825-2546 242 MBI N/A lake@mbi.ucla.edu Kenneth Lange 206-8076 5357-B GC N/A klange@ucla.edu Aldons “Jake” Lusis 825-1359 3730 MRL 6524 GC jlusis@mednet.ucla.edu Martinez Julian 794-2405 4554-B GC 4554 GC julianmartinez@mednet.ucla.edu Edward McCabe 825-5095 4506-A GC 4309 GC emccabe@mednet.ucla.edu Linda McCabe 206-8450 4506-B GC 4309 GC lmccabe@mednet.ucla.edu Stanley Nelson 794-7981 5506-A GC 5554 GC snelson@ucla.edu Roel Ophoff 794-9602 3558 GC N/A rophoff@mednet.ucla.edu Paivi Pajukanta 267-2011 6335-B GC 6335 GC ppajukanta@mednet.ucla.edu Christina Palmer 794-4796 47422 NPI N/A cpalmer@mednet.ucla.edu Jeanette Papp 825-6204 5309-B GC 5309 GC jcpapp@mednet.ucla.edu GC = Gonda Center MS = Math Science (Boelter Hall) MRL = MacDonald Research Laboratories MBI = Molecular Biology Institute (Boyer Hall) NPI = Neuropsychiatric Institute NRB = Neuroscience Research Building AY 09-10 40
    • Faculty Ofc. Phone Office Lab E-mail Karen Reue 794-5631 6506-A GC 6309 GC reuek@ucla.edu David Rimoin 423-4461 Cedars-Sinai Medical Ctr. drimoin@mailgate.csmc.edu Jerome Rotter 423-6467 Cedars-Sinai Medical Ctr. jerome.rotter@cshs.org Chiara Sabatti 794-9567 6357-A GC N/A csabatti@ucla.edu Janet Sinsheimer 825-8002 5357-C GC N/A janet@mednet.ucla.edu Eric Sobel 825-1111 5558 GC N/A esobel@mednet.ucla.edu Marc Suchard 825-0936 6558 GC 6545 GC msuchard@ucla.edu Eric Vilain 267-2455 5506-B GC 5524 GC evilain@ucla.edu Stephen Young 825-4934 4770 MRL 4524 GC sgyoung@mednet.ucla.edu GC = Gonda Center MS = Math Science (Boelter Hall) MRL = MacDonald Research Laboratories MBI = Molecular Biology Institute (Boyer Hall) NPI = Neuropsychiatric Institute NRB = Neuroscience Research Building AY 09-10 41