THE MICROGUIDE




                                Photo: © 2000 Raquel Izumi




 A HANDBOOK FOR THE UNDERGRADUATE
   MIC...
On the cover: A confocal micrograph of a fluorescently labeled peptide developed in the laboratory of Dr. Asim Dasgupta fr...
Welcome to
      M&MG
THIS GUIDE IS A RESOURCE. Within these pages M&MG students are provided valuable information on the ...
Table of Contents
THE MICROBIOLOGY MAJOR ....................................................................................
The Microbiology Major
       WHAT IS THE MICROBIOLOLGY & MOLECULAR GENETICS MAJOR? The goal of the Bachelor of Science (B...
Major Requirements
COURSE NUMBER                      UNITS      COURSE NAME                                         QTRS
...
Major Electives
M&MG DEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVES
COURSE NUMBER             COURSE NAME                                         ...
Unlimited Electives
APPROVED ELECTIVES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS



COURSE NUMBER         COURSE NAME                        ...
Limited Electives
Limited Electives Guidelines: Any single course from Groups A-G may fulfill the elective requirement
for...
GROUP C

COURSE NUMBER COURSE NAME                                                       QTRS

Chem 153B/BH   Biochemistry...
GROUP F

COURSE NUMBER COURSE NAME                                                         QTRS

Chem 154         Biochemi...
Sample Schedule
                             Fall Quarter             Winter Quarter           Spring Quarter
    1st Year...
Departmental Honors
                 Program
                                                                    LIBRARY R...
Undergraduate Research
OPPORTUNITIES in undergraduate research are available within both Microbiology & Molecular Genetics...
Approaching Professors
                                                                      WEB SITE WITH PROFESSOR’S BIO...
Opportunities in Research
WORKING IN A LAB does not have to culminate your research experience at UCLA. There are addition...
Research Outside UCLA
INTERNSHIPS provide not only more exposure to research but also a chance to experience either a diff...
Careers in Microbiology
WHAT CAN I DO WITH A MICROBIOLOGY DEGREE? It is important to remember that experience gained durin...
Alternative Careers
                      for Science Majors
GRADUATES with life science degrees are finding career niches...
Graduate School
AN ADVANCED DEGREE in the form of a PhD (Doctor of Philosophy) or Master’s Degree is also an option for mi...
The Final Word
IN SUMMARY we want to remind you that this guide describes only a few of the wealth of opportunities here a...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

MicroguidePrePDF

932 views
859 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
932
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

MicroguidePrePDF

  1. 1. THE MICROGUIDE Photo: © 2000 Raquel Izumi A HANDBOOK FOR THE UNDERGRADUATE MICROBIOLOGY STUDENTS AT UCLA 1
  2. 2. On the cover: A confocal micrograph of a fluorescently labeled peptide developed in the laboratory of Dr. Asim Dasgupta from the Microbiology and Immunology Department. The peptide has putative antiviral activity against several viruses including poliovirus and hepatitis C virus. In the micrograph the peptide is green and the nuclei of the hepatic cells are blue. Editorial: Raquel Izumi and Heidi Cohen Design: Raquel Izumi © 2000 Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of California. Counseling Services, College of Letters and Science, University of California. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the written permission of the publisher. For information on getting permission for reprints and excerpts, contact the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 1602B MSB, Los Angeles, CA 90095, (310) 825- 8482. 2
  3. 3. Welcome to M&MG THIS GUIDE IS A RESOURCE. Within these pages M&MG students are provided valuable information on the major, undergraduate research and career development. UCLA offers a wealth of opportunities to enrich your educational experience and therefore allow you to chose the best path toward your career destination. The Road goes ever on and on Down from the door where it began. Now far ahead the Road has gone, And I must follow, if I can, Pursuing it with eager feet, Until it joins some larger way Where many paths and errands meet. And whither then? I cannot say. — J. R. Tolkien, Lord of the Rings 3
  4. 4. Table of Contents THE MICROBIOLOGY MAJOR ................................................................................................................... 5 Life Science Core Curriculum ................................................................................................................. 5 Major Requirements ................................................................................................................................ 6 Major Electives ........................................................................................................................................ 7 Academic Counseling ............................................................................................................................ 11 Sample Schedule .................................................................................................................................... 12 Tips on Course Selection ....................................................................................................................... 12 DEPARTMENTAL HONORS ..................................................................................................................... 13 Requirements ......................................................................................................................................... 13 References for scientific writing ............................................................................................................ 13 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH ................................................................................................ 14 SRP versus 199 ...................................................................................................................................... 14 Approaching Professors ........................................................................................................................ 15 Special Programs................................................................................................................................... 16 Undergraduate Science Journals ........................................................................................................... 16 RESEARCH OUTSIDE UCLA ..................................................................................................................... 17 Internships ............................................................................................................................................. 17 Education and Work Abroad ................................................................................................................. 17 CAREERS IN MICROBIOLOGY ................................................................................................................. 18 Professional Schools .............................................................................................................................. 18 Alternative Careers ................................................................................................................................ 19 GRADUATE SCHOOL ................................................................................................................................ 20 Learning about Graduate School........................................................................................................... 20 Tips on Applying to Graduate School .................................................................................................... 20 STUDENT GROUPS.................................................................................................................................... 21 4
  5. 5. The Microbiology Major WHAT IS THE MICROBIOLOLGY & MOLECULAR GENETICS MAJOR? The goal of the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree is to introduce students not only to general and medical microbiology but also to the associated subdisciplines of: Biochemistry Cell and Molecular Biology Genetics Virology Cellular Physiology Immunology The major requires a heavy concentration of courses in chemistry, mathematics and physics. THE LIFE SCIENCES CORE CURRICULUM This common program of study is designed to prepare students for any discipline in the life sciences they choose to pursue. The LS Core includes all the preparatory courses for the major and provides a basic background in all disciplines within the life sciences. The following courses are required for the LS Core: General & Organic Chemistry Calculus Chem 14A,B,BL,C,CL,140 Math 3A,B,C Or Or Chem 20A,B,20L,30L,30,130A,AL Math 31A,B,32A Calculus-based Physics Biology, Cell/Molecular Biology, Genetics Physics 6A,B,C Life Sciences 1, 2 (lab), 3 (lab), 4 Or Physics 1A,1B,4AL,1C,4BL Most of these classes are offered throughout the academic year, including Summer Sessions. The following requirements apply to the LS Core: • All courses must be taken for a letter grade. • All preparatory courses must be taken in sequence. • In addition to requirements for graduation prescribed by the College of Letters and Science, students are required to maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 in order to maintain good academic standing. • No more than two grades of D or lower; no more than two repeats are allowed. FREE TUTORIALS are available for most of the LS Core classes at Covel Commons 228/230. Early sign up is strongly encouraged. Drop-in hours are also available. 5
  6. 6. Major Requirements COURSE NUMBER UNITS COURSE NAME QTRS Chem & Biochem 153A, L 4,4 Biochemistry, Laboratory All Microbiology 101, L 5,3 Bacteriology, Laboratory* F,S Microbiology 102, L 4,2 Virology, Laboratory* W Chem & Biochem 153C 4 Biosynthetic/Energy Metabolism/Regulation All Microbiology M185A 5 Immunology F Microbiology C159 5 Advanced Molecular Genetics W Microbiology C106 4 Molecular/Genetic Basis-Bacterial Infections S Plus four (4) additional elective courses from the approved departmental list on the following pages. ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR • All courses in the Major must be taken for a letter grade. • In addition to requirements for graduation prescribed by the College of Letters and Science, the student is required to maintain a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the major in order to maintain good academic standing. • Chem 153A, Life Sciences 3 and Life Sciences 4 must be completed prior to taking the upper division Microbiology courses. • *Micro 101/101L and Micro 102/102L must be taken concurrently. • Micro 102/L may be taken before 101/L. • Physics may be taken in the third year. 6
  7. 7. Major Electives M&MG DEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVES COURSE NUMBER COURSE NAME QTRS C112 Molecular Biology of Bacterial Growth 120 Advanced Techniques in Microbiology S CM133 Principles, Practices, and Policies in Biotechnology W CM156 Human Genetics F CM165 Bioprocess Technology F CM168 Molecular Parasitology W M176 Advanced Topics in Animal Virus/Host Interaction F M185B Intermediate Immunology W 195 Proseminar 199 Special Studies in Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics 199H Honors Thesis C206-290 Graduate courses may be used as long as they are taken for a letter grade ELECTIVE RULES • A six-unit (6) course counts as one elective towards the major • A two-unit (2) course counts as one half of an elective towards the major. Two 2-unit courses equals one elective. • Microbiology 199: must have junior or senior standing with a minimum 3.0 GPA in the pre- major/major, completion of Chemistry 153A/L or consent of the instructor. The first 4.0 units must be taken P/NP. Only 4.0 units of letter-graded 199 can be used as an elective on the major. Microbiology and Immunology 199 may also be used adhering to these same guidelines. Credit for 199’s from other departments may not be applied toward the major. • Graduate courses taken for a letter grade may be used via petition. 7
  8. 8. Unlimited Electives APPROVED ELECTIVES FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS COURSE NUMBER COURSE NAME QTRS OBEE 135 Population Genetics OBEE 146 Physiochemical Biology OBEE M166 Animal Physiology OBEE 167 Regulatory Physiology BiolChem CM153G Macromolecular Structure BiolChem CM159A Mechanisms in Regulation of Transcription I BiolChem CM159B Mechanisms in Regulation of Transcription II ChemIO3 Environmental Chemistry Chem 156 Physical Biochemistry Chem C165 Metabolic Control by Protein Modification EHS 210* Public Health and Environmental Microbiology MCDB 138 Developmental Biology MCDB CM160 Biological Catalysis MCDB CM169 Cell Structure, Signaling and Differentiation MCDB 171 Principles of Neurobiology MCDB C174D Molecular Biology of Extracellular Matrix M Pharm 100A Drugs:Mechanisms, Uses, Misuses Any of the courses list on this and the previous page will fulfill the elective requirement for the Major. Unlimited means you can chose as many as you like. 8
  9. 9. Limited Electives Limited Electives Guidelines: Any single course from Groups A-G may fulfill the elective requirement for the major. You may select only one course from any particular group. For example, you may use one course from Group A and one from Group B, but not two courses from Group A. It is not required that you select any of these courses—these course are options in addition to the major electives. These guidelines affect students entering the major as of Fall 1999. GROUP A COURSE NUMBER COURSE NAME QTRS Biomath 106 Introduction to Cellular Modeling Biomath 160 Introductory Biomathematics for Medical and Biological Research W Biomath 170A Computer-based Introductory Biomathematics for Medical and Biological F Experimenters Biomath M207A Theoretical Genetic Modeling Biomath M207B Applied Genetic Modeling GROUP B COURSE NUMBER COURSE NAME QTRS Biomath 170B Statistical and Mathematical Modeling in Medical and Biological Research Biostat 100A* Introduction to Biostatistics Biostat 110A* Basic Biostatistics *SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH COURSES: Please note that Public Health routinely restricts telephone enrollment to their graduate students. Undergraduates may enroll via Permission to Enroll (PTE) numbers obtained from the course instructor. 9
  10. 10. GROUP C COURSE NUMBER COURSE NAME QTRS Chem 153B/BH Biochemistry: DNA RNAand Protein Synthesis F,W,S MCDB 144 Molecular Biology F,S MCDB C174A Molecular Evolution S OBEE 121 Molecular Biology and Evolution W GROUP D COURSE NUMBER COURSE NAME QTRS OBEE 162 Plant Physiology MCDB C141 Molecular Basis of Plant Differentiation and Development W Chem C161A Plant Biochemistry W MCDB M170 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Photosynthetic Apparatus GROUP E COURSE NUMBER COURSE NAME QTRS MIMG CM168 Molecular Parasitology W Epidem 100* Introduction to Epidemiology W,S Epidem 220* Principles of Infectious Disease Epidemiology F Epidem 221 * Prevalent and Emerging Infectious Diseases in the World Epidem 223A* Protozoal Diseases of Man Epidem 223B* Protozoal Disease of Man (laboratory) MCDB 155 Molecular Genetic Methods W MCDB 157 Gene Manipulation: Genetic Engineering MCDB C174F Molecular Parasitology S OBEE 181 Parasitology and Symbiosis 10
  11. 11. GROUP F COURSE NUMBER COURSE NAME QTRS Chem 154 Biochemical Methods II F,W,S ChemEng C115 Biochemical Reaction Engineering S ChemEng C125 Bioseparations and Bioprocess Engineering W MIMG CM165 Bioprocess Technology F GROUP G COURSE NUMBER COURSE NAME QTRS OBEE 153 Cellular Physiology: Functional Histology OBEE M158 Cell Biology MCDB C139 Molecular Cell Biology MCDB M140 Cell Biology: Cell Cycle S MCDB C174B Molecular Biology of Cell Nucleus MCDB C174C Eukaryotic DNA Replication and Cell Cycle Control MCDB C174G Signal Transduction by G-Protein Coupled Receptors W NEED ADVICE? QUESTIONS about the major or College of Letters and Science requirements? Don’t ask your friends. Ask the experts: For questions about the major see the departmental counselor (1602B Molecular Science Bldg.). For questions about L&S requirements see either Counseling Assistants or full-time counselors (Murphy A-316). Academic Advancement Program( AAP), Honors and Athletics Students have their own full-time counselors, but can see Counseling Assistants and departmental counselors also. 11
  12. 12. Sample Schedule Fall Quarter Winter Quarter Spring Quarter 1st Year Chem 14A (4) Chem 14B/BL (6) Chem 14C/CL (7) Math 3A (4) Math 3B (4) Math 3C (4) Open LS 1 (4) LS 2 (L) (5) Open Open Open 2nd Year Chem 140 (4) Chem 153A (4) Chem 153L (4) Physics 6A (4) Physics 6B (4) Physics 6C (4) LS 3 (L) (5) LS 4 (4) Open Open Open Open 3rd Year Micro 101/L† (8) Micro 102/L‡ (6) Chem 153C (4) Open Open Micro Elective (4) Open Open Open Open Open Open 4th Year Micro M185A (5) Micro C159 (5) Micro C106 (4) Micro Elective (4) Micro Elective (4) Micro Elective (4) Open Open Open Open Open Open TIPS ON COURSE SELECTION PREREQUISITES are there for a reason and are usually enforced through URSA registration. It is essential to familiarize yourself with the prerequisites for all the courses you plan to take. You must have completed the prerequisites before taking any microbiology courses. The UCLA General Catalogue and the online catalogue (http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/catalog/) contain course descriptions and prerequisites. It is your responsibility to assure that prerequisites are completed before enrolling in a course. SEQUENCE of the LS core courses is important. Most of these courses have “sequence restrictions” meaning that if take them out of order you will not get credit for them. It is therefore important to take the prep courses in the order shown on above. IMPACTED classes must be dropped by 5 pm Friday of second week or else a petition will be necessary. Petitions to drop impacted classes are not approved without a very compelling reason. 12
  13. 13. Departmental Honors Program LIBRARY RESOURCES FOR WRITING • The Language of Science, a Guide to Effective Writing by William Gilman Eligibility • Essentials of Writing Biomedical Research Papers by Mimi Zeiger • 3.2 GPA in pre-major; 3.5 GPA in major. • Writing the Biomedical Research Paper by Stanley M. Garn • Junior or Senior standing • Science, Medicine, and Technology : English Grammar and Technical Writing by Peter Antony Master Requirements • Science and Technical Writing : A Manual of Style by Philip Rubens, general editor • Sponsorship from a faculty member from either Microbiology & Molecular Genetics or Microbiology & Immunology. Sponsors from other departments are not permissible. • Three (3) consecutive quarters of Microbiology 199H in the same sponsor's lab. • First quarter of 199H may be taken no later than Spring Quarter of Junior year in order to complete thesis by graduation. • First two quarters of 199H must be taken P/NP; last quarter may be taken for letter grade. The final quarter of 199H may be applied toward the upper division major requirement. It counts as one elective. • One (1) quarter Microbiology 195 to be taken in Senior year. • Completion of an Honors Thesis—due during Spring Quarter of Senior year. MICROBIOLOGY 195 (Proseminar) is a seminar course, offered once each year, that involves reading, discussion and presentation of current research topics. The topics vary from year to year and the course may be taken more than once, however only one quarter of 195 may be applied toward the Major. It counts as 1/2 an elective. Students must be in their Senior year in order to enroll in Micro 195. DR. JEFFERY H. MILLER is the departmental honors advisor. His office is located at 436 Molecular Biology Institute. Phone: 310/825-8460. Email: jhmiller@ewald.mbi.ucla.edu. For more information on departmental honors see the department counselor at 1602 MSB. 13
  14. 14. Undergraduate Research OPPORTUNITIES in undergraduate research are available within both Microbiology & Molecular Genetics and Microbiology & Immunology. Undergraduates are strongly encouraged to engage in the laboratory research experience as early as their schedules permit. ADVANTAGES: For students contemplating professional or UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH WEB PAGES graduate school, research is, in most cases, vital. Student Research Program (SRP) Additionally, it has been observed that students doing http://www.college.ucla.edu/up/SRP/ research tend to more fully master the material covered in Center for Academic & Research Excellence (CARE) their didactic courses. http://www.lifesci.ucla.edu/CARE/ Doing research engages students more directly and applicably in their chosen field of study. It exposes them to the research GETTING STARTED: The first thing to do is find a faculty milieu, and offers opportunities to become involved in the sponsor: life of a scientific researcher by designing and carrying out their own experiments, interacting with others in the lab, 1 Review the faculty research interests. attending lab meetings and journal clubs, presenting their work, and sometimes even getting their work published. 2 Select those faculty members in whose labs you think you would like to work. FACULTY INVOLVEMENT: While the majority of our faculty accept undergraduate researchers in their labs, many have certain course requirements that need to be fulfilled 3 Contact them directly. Going to their offices or labs in person is usually the best way. Email works O.K. beforehand, such as organic chemistry or molecular biology, Avoid phones...it is often difficult to reach faculty so students generally begin doing research in their sophomore this way. or junior years, although some start as early as their freshman year. Check the SRP (Student Research Program ) website or 4 Prepare a brief resume and cover letter to leave with with faculty directly to find out about course requirements. the faculty member. Many professors require new research students to do at least one term of SRP before approving a 199 project. 5 Discuss with your faculty sponsor whether you should do SRP or 199. THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SRP AND 199 HOW DO I SIGN UP? SRP 199 For SRP: subscribe to the SRP subscription through your My. UCLA page. Then, by viewing the SRP calendar, you can Small project Larger, more independent attend one of the required informational workshops. One quarter Two-three quarters For 199: get a 199 Petition from the departmental counseling 8-10 hr/wk 10-15 hr/wk office. Requires Junior or Senior standing. P/NP P/NP or graded Both programs' forms require signatures from your faculty sponsor. No report required Report required 14
  15. 15. Approaching Professors WEB SITE WITH PROFESSOR’S BIOGRAPHIES Microbiology and Molecular Genetics GETTING IN Once you have narrowed down your list to a few professors take the time to familiarize yourself with http://www.mimg.ucla.edu/ their field and most importantly read a few of their publications. The departmental biographies of the professors include a list of their most recent publications. Getting into a lab is like applying MARKET YOURSELF It is important to make an "ad" to for a job sell yourself. Keep these questions in mind as you prepare your one page "ad": Since there are more students than lab availability it is important to take your first meeting with a prospective Why do you want to do research? (e.g. learn more about a faculty member as seriously as you would a job particular field, work closely with scientists, get experience interview. So the following rules for applying to a job for graduate school, etc.) work well for getting into a lab: Why should a faculty mentor want you? For example what experience do you have via science fair or internships or are Chose more than one professor because you might not you enthusiastic about science and willing to work hard. get into your “first” choice. If a professor says no don’t take it personally. There are many reasons why a Your “ad” should be no more than one page long and professor can’t always take students. Don’t give up include the following: and move on to your next choice. • Your major Do your homework. Be familiar with the field, the professor’s work via publications and his or her lab • A list of all the ways to get in touch with you: e-mail, environment by speaking with graduate and phone, pager#, etc. undergraduate students in the lab. • A list of background courses you have taken (i.e. physics, chemistry, calculus, etc.) Be on time to your appointment and don’t forget your “ad”. Don’t miss your appointment without giving the • A description of the experience you're looking for, if professor adequate notice. you can (techniques, tasks, etc.) First impressions matter. So although you don’t need • How many quarters will you be involved? to show up in a suit you also don’t want to show up • How many hours will you commit each week? looking like something the cat dragged in either. • At what times are you available? Enthusiasm counts a lot. Professors are more likely to let you work in their lab if you show enthusiasm and a • Any previous research experience (i.e. science fair or willingness to work hard. summer internships) THE PRESIDENT’S UNDERGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP provides stipends ($100-$2000) for students working with faculty on an original project. Financial need not required. Applications available mid-January form the Financial Aid Office, A-129J Murphy Hall. 15
  16. 16. Opportunities in Research WORKING IN A LAB does not have to culminate your research experience at UCLA. There are additional activities available to expand your intellectual horizons. Although these activities are optional their advantages are many fold— looking good on resumes or applications to graduate/professional schools, providing mediums for expression of your scientific successes and in some cases providing stipends for research or travel. SPECIAL RESEARCH PROGRAMS Communicate The Howard Hughes Honors Undergraduate Research your findings Program is a program that allows a student to work in a laboratory a minimum of 10 hours/week during the The UCLA Undergraduate Science Journal (http:// academic year. The stipend amount is a total of $3000, www.studentgroups.ucla.edu/USJ/) was established by divided over the Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Students members of the student body at the UCLA in order to participating in the program also take part in the Howard provide an opportunity for undergraduates to present and Hughes Journal Club (http://www.lifesci.ucla.edu/CARE/ publish research findings. html/journalclub.html). Applications are available at CARE in 2121 Life Science Building. Applicants should Science Poster Day (http://www.college.ucla.edu/ be UCLA students, and do not need to be CARE members. ugresearch/celebration/call.html) was created to provide a forum for undergraduates to share there research results. The CARE Quarterly Research Program is a 10-week Science poster day occurs every spring and any UCLA program which allows a student to work in a laboratory a student with two or more quarters of SRP or 199 or minimum of 10 hours/week. The stipend amount is a eligible. A Dean’s Prize of $500 is awarded each year to maximum of $1000 for 10 weeks of research. Applicants six outstanding undergraduate researchers. should be CARE students and CAMP or MSD eligible. Applications are available during 6th week of the Travel Grants for Undergraduate Researchers preceding application quarter (e.g. 6th week of Fall for Undergraduate students who have authored or co-authored Winter applicants) except during Fall Quarter (they are an abstract or paper that has been accepted for presentation available the first week of Fall). Check with CARE ( http:// at a national or regional meeting may apply for travel www.lifesci.ucla.edu/CARE/inside/info.html) for the exact funds. Up to $300 may be awarded; applications are deadline. available in the centers. The Undergraduate Research Development Stipend Awards (URDS) are available on a competitive basis and MORE INFORMATION ON UNDERGRAD RESEARCH by application for undergraduate students who have financial need and who want to participate in two quarters Available from: of research through the Student Research Program. The Audrey Cramer, PhD commitment to the SRP project is for two quarters, Winter Undergraduate Research Centers and Spring, and the stipends are set at $1,000 per quarter. Life and Physical Sciences Applications for the URDS award are accepted during the FALL QUARTER ONLY and the deadline for submission 2121 Life Sciences Building of applications is early December. Phone (310) 794-4227 16
  17. 17. Research Outside UCLA INTERNSHIPS provide not only more exposure to research but also a chance to experience either a different academic setting or industry or even a foreign country. SUMMER INTERNSHIPS OPPORTUNITIES http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/ug.htm Educational Opportunities for Undergraduates - search http://www.yale.edu/necuse/ engine provided by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. A guide to summer research opportunities for undergraduate students in science and engineering. http://www.fie.com/fedix/ FEDIX: Your source of federal research and education http://www.sacnas.org/fellow.html opportunities. An exhaustive list of summer programs along with many scholarships/fellowships. TRAVEL http://www.nsf.gov/home/crssprgm/reu/start.htm National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates - REU - lists hundreds of summer programs in Biological Sciences and other fields. WORK ABROAD International Education Program (IEP) (email: IEPSoCal@aol.com or IEPNorCal@aol.com) offers http://www.training.nih.gov/student/ summer employment in Germany, Switzerland, Austria, National Institutes of Health - Click on the Summer Belgium, France, Finland, Japan, and South America. Work Internship Program in Biomedical Research - they accept is available in: retail sales, banking and finance, marketing, 800-1000 undergraduate students each summer! hospitality, engineering, agriculture, health care, chemistry, travel, and recreation. http://www.hhmi.org/grants/undergraduate/overview/ Requirements: Howard Hughes Medical Institute - Click on Student 1. At least 18 years of age. Research. The site features a search engine allowing you 2. Minimum 1-2 college-level foreign language instruction. to search by year in school, location, and scientific 3. Current enrollment in foreign language course prior to interest. departure. http://www.faseb.org/ascb/commit/mac/summer98. For more information, brochure, and application come and html see Eva Walthers at EXPO (109 Kerckhoff Hall). Listing of Undergraduate Biology Summer Science The EXPO also has additional information on working Programs. abroad. http://www.orau.gov/doe_erulf/ EDUCATION ABROAD PROGRAM (EAP) also offers Energy Research Undergraduate Laboratory Fellowships programs for biological sciences. For more information and (ERULF) are designed to provide educational training list of recommended countries check out the following web and research experiences at Department of Energy (DOE) site: http://www.uoeap.ucsb.edu/ Laboratories for highly motivated, undergraduate students. 17
  18. 18. Careers in Microbiology WHAT CAN I DO WITH A MICROBIOLOGY DEGREE? It is important to remember that experience gained during your undergraduate years through internships, undergraduate research, volunteer service and so on determines your attractiveness to potential employers more than your actual degree title. Nevertheless the background training provided by the microbiology major is a segue into many exciting careers as well as professional or graduate school. BIOTECHNOLOGY involves developing biological agents GOVERNMENT EMPLOYMENT Federal, state and local into therapeutics for plants, animals and humans. The types government has many opportunities for microbiologists, of companies engaged in biotechnological research include particularly in the area of public health. Microbiologists pharmaceutical, genetic engineering and agricultural firms. are also needed in various areas such as Centers for As the advances in molecular biology continue to emerge at Disease Control, National Institutes of Health, Corps of a frenetic pace and we get closer to sequencing the human Engineers and the armed forces. The Federal government genome, the growth in these industries should continue. For posts job listings throughout the country at their website: more information on biotechnology visit the following sites: http://jobsfed.com • http://www.asmusa.org/edusrc/edu21.htm • http://bio.com/hr/ • http://recruit.sciencemag.org FORENSICS AND LAW ENFOREMENT Another • http://www2.nas.edu/cpc increasingly popular area of interest involves forensic • http://www.biospace.com/b2/job_index.cfm science. “Medical detectives” use molecular techniques to assist law enforcement agencies in solving crimes. The • http://dir.yahoo.com/Science/Biology/ strong background provided by the Microbiology Major • http://www.amgen.com/career/careerCenter.html provides excellent preparation for careers in molecular crime solving. Find out more at http://www.thename.org/ TEACHING can be one of the most rewarding careers for career/career.htm UCLA also has an on campus Forensics science majors. Currently there is a dearth of quality Society. For more information contact them via email at teachers in the sciences underscoring the need for science forensic@ucla.edu graduates to seriously consider teaching a career choice. PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS The microbiology degree UCLA offers a new special program to undergraduates in also provides excellent training for students planning to the life and physical sciences to earn their teaching pursue a professional degree upon graduation. Here are a credentials simultaneously with their Bachelor’s degrees. few possibilities: For more information on the Science Education Program, contact Dr. Arlene A. Russell, russell@chem.ucla.edu. Medicine Dentistry Teach for America is an Americorps project that allows Public Health Pharmacy recent graduates to receive practical teaching experience in Genetic Counseling Nursing inner city and rural K-12 schools. New teachers participate Physicians Assistant Optometry in a training program before being assigned to various Physical Therapy Podiatry schools throughout the country. For more information, visit: Osteopathic Medicine Law http://www.teachforamerica.org. Chiropractic Medicine The Preprofessional Advising Office (PAO) in A-334 Murphy Halls provides information and counseling for students preparing for professional schools. 18
  19. 19. Alternative Careers for Science Majors GRADUATES with life science degrees are finding career niches in areas of business and communications. Here is a short list of some potential career paths. Consulting/Publishing Patent Agent or Patent Lawyer Technical Writing Clinical Trials Affairs Science Journalism Technology Transfer Science Publishing Corporate Communications Broadcast Journalism Sales and Marketing Venture Capital Head Hunter Biotech Investment Analysis Science Education Policy Business Development Science Policy Entrepreneur Research Funding Administrator Business Consulting Government Research Program Manager Regulatory Affairs Information Services Entrepreneur Informatics Scientific and Medical Illustration and Imaging WANT MORE INFORMATION? The Career Center on campus as a plethora of information on these fields and many more. Two excellent resource books available in the Career Center library are: • Guide to Non-Traditional Careers in Science by Karen Young Kreeger • Alternative Careers in Science: Leaving the Ivory Tower edited by Dr. Cynthia Robbins-Roth INTERESTED IN ENVIRONMENTAL CAREERS? The Career Center has the following books: • Environmental Careers in the 21st Century by The Environmental Careers Organization • 100 Jobs in the Environment by Debra Quintana For more career info check out: Science’s Next Wave at http:// nextwave.sciencemag.org 19
  20. 20. Graduate School AN ADVANCED DEGREE in the form of a PhD (Doctor of Philosophy) or Master’s Degree is also an option for microbiology graduates. A Master’s Degree is not necessary for admission into a PhD program, however, it can provide advanced training applicable for a career in research* or some of the alternative careers mentioned on the previous page. A Master’s Degree is often considered more flexible than a PhD. A PhD is necessary for higher positions in research and academia. Many PhD’s have found their way into “alternative careers” as the job markets are currently pretty tight in industry and academia. The process of getting a PhD takes considerably longer than a Master’s Degree—5-7 years versus 2 years, respectively, therefore it is imperative for prospective graduate students to carefully research their options and career objectives before taking the graduate school plunge. UNDERSTANDING GRADUATE SCHOOL is the first step toward determining whether graduate school is right for you. Tips for Prospective Graduate Students The following books provide valuable insight into the PhD experience: • Getting What You Came For by Robert Peters DON’T go to graduate school to put off deciding what you want to do with your life after graduation. • A PhD is NOT Enough by Peter Feibelman DO apply for major graduate school fellowships such as NSF • The PhD Process by Dale Bloom, Jonathan Karp and and Howard Hughes even if you think you are not competitive Nicholas Cohen enough to make the cut. For more information on fellowships visit: The Special Fellowships Office (1252 Murphy Hall). Some of these books are available at the Career Center or through interlibrary loan at UCLA. Once you have decided to DO ask faculty or departmental counselors to determine which go to graduate school the Career Center is also a great place departments are strongest in your field of interest. learn about graduate school programs. The following books serve as great starting points: DO make an appointment to meet with a Counseling Assistant in your area of interest to get more in depth information about • Peterson’s Annual Guides to Graduate Study graduate school • Princeton Review’s Student Access Guide to the Best DON’T go to graduate school without first meeting with Graduate and Professional Schools several graduate students from the department you want to attend. * See “Bright Career Prospects for Core Scientists of the Biopharmaceutical Industry” by Michael Woods in Science (1998) vol. 281, pp. 1022-1046. 20
  21. 21. The Final Word IN SUMMARY we want to remind you that this guide describes only a few of the wealth of opportunities here at UCLA. You are encouraged to make the most of your undergraduate experience by exploring the activities in this guide as well as those not featured here and determining which options well be best suited for your career path. This last section list a handful of the student organizations available at UCLA—a great way to network and meet students with similar interests or backgrounds. STUDENT GROUPS • Association for Careers in Technology • Black Pre-Health Organization • Black/Latinos AIDS Project For a complete list of student groups check out: http:// www.studentgroups.ucla.edu/ • The UCLA Business Association • CALPRIG • Chicano/Latino for Community Medicine • CityLab USA Remember that you will get out of your education only • Club Med what you are willing to put into it. Most importantly don’t forget to have fun! • Community Outreach of Prevention Education • Excel • Pre-dental Society • Pre-law Society • Pre-medical Society • Pre-optometry Society • Pre-pharmacy Society • Project Literacy 21

×