UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN


SCHOOL OF MEDICAL
    SCIENCES
      DEGREE PROGRAMMES IN:
           BIOCHEMISTRY
 BIOMEDICAL SC...
2
CONTENTS

Honours Year - General Info:            p          Tutorials:                                 p
5               ...
Tutorial Synopses

Past Examination Papers:                   p
88
Papers 1 - 4 available at
www.abdn.ac.uk/diss/library/e...
5
WELCOME TO THE HONOURS COURSE

We are pleased to welcome you into the Honours Course, the final year of your undergraduate...
7
TIMETABLE FOR 2006-2007 HONOURS

Week        Week beginning
11     18 September 2006      Kindrogan                       ...
9
THE ROLE OF THE HONOURS CO-ORDINATORS

Welcome to your level 4 courses in the School of Medical Sciences. We are the level...
RESPONSIBILITIES OF HONOURS STUDENTS


1.   You must ensure that you are available, without exception, during term time th...
HONOURS PROJECTS 2006-2007


                                      PROJECT TITLE                           SUPERVISOR     ...
13
GENETICS (IMMUNOLOGY)
Abdullah, Ahmad Do heparan proteoglycans act as signalling co-            Dr W F Long           Prof...
Points of Contact
Messages for individuals will be left in the Honours Class pigeon hole (round the corner from the School...
Post-Graduate Study
Many of our graduates go on to become research students either here in Aberdeen or in other universiti...
STAFF CONTACTS
              Teaching Staff                   E-mail                     Office          Room             ...
18
HONOURS COURSEWORK SUMMARY



NAME
DISCIPLINE
TUTOR
PROJECT SUPERVISOR
CORE MODULES          ADVANCED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
OP...
20
ATTENDANCE AND PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS:

Students are expected to attend ALL lectures, tutorial and practical classes and...
this decision. If you wish consideration to be given to reinstating you in the course you will require to meet
with the Co...
the VP Education & Employability vped@abdn.ac.uk . For further information on class representation and
student involvement...
We intend that students attending our courses and Degree programmes should:

1.      acquire factual, up-to-date knowledge...
For Option 1 (Receptors and Cell Signalling) and Essay 1 (RNA catalysis and modification)
(a) describe using examples from...
a) understand and describe the interaction of cells cytokines chemokines and other immune mediators
       that regulate l...
The subject-specific learning outcomes are such that, at the end of the course.


Biochemistry and related students should...
(c) processing and manipulation of data derived from the research project
(d) presentation of research project data to lab...
Section C requires that the student suggest, in response to specific questions, ways in which the
        research describ...
30
Honours Degree Classification
All Honours Degrees are classified using the University’s Grade Spectrum which is available ...
assessment. In case that one of these course marks is a fail, candidates may have to resit relevant exams for
a degree to ...
SCHOOL OF MEDICAL SCIENCES (MOLECULAR & CELL BIOLOGY)

                                                 LEVEL 3 AND 4

   ...
PRESCRIBED MODULES FOR HONOURS DEGREES 2006-2007

ALL HONOURS DEGREES ATTEND THE FOLLOWING ADVANCED MOLECULAR
AND CELL BIO...
CORE COURSE
                                         SESSION 2006-2007


Genome Organisation and Analysis - Dr Jonathan Pe...
Control of Gene Expression - Dr Berndt Mueller
Week    Date    Time    Title                                           Sta...
BIOCHEMISTRY OPTION 1 - RECEPTORS AND CELL SIGNALLING
                     SESSION 2006-2007

Biochemistry
Biochemistry (I...
BIOCHEMISTRY OPTION 2 – BIOCHEMISTRY OF HUMAN DISEASES
                     SESSION 2006-2007

Biochemistry
Biomedical Sci...
GENETICS OPTION 1 – MEDICAL GENETICS
                              SESSION 2006-2007

Molecular Biology
Genetics
Genetics ...
GENETICS OPTION 2 - POPULATION GENETICS
                           SESSION 2006-2007

Genetics

Week   Date    Time    Cla...
IMMUNOLOGY OPTION 1 – INFECTION, IMMUNITY AND
                        INFLAMMATION
                       SESSION 2006-200...
IMMUNOLOGY OPTION 2 - MOLECULAR IMMUNOLOGY
                       SESSION 2006-2007


Biochemistry (Immunology)
Genetics (...
MICROBIOLOGY OPTION 1 - POPULATION AND ENVIRONMENT
                      SESSION 2006-2007




Microbiology




Week    Da...
MICROBIOLOGY OPTION 2 -
                       ANTIBIOTIC SYNTHESIS AND RESISTANCE
                                 SESSIO...
CORE MODULE - GENOME ORGANISATION AND ANALYSIS
                        SESSION 2006-2007


The genome is the primary sourc...
Honours Manual 2006-2007.doc
Honours Manual 2006-2007.doc
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Honours Manual 2006-2007.doc

  1. 1. UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN SCHOOL OF MEDICAL SCIENCES DEGREE PROGRAMMES IN: BIOCHEMISTRY BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (Molecular Biology) BIOTECHNOLOGY (Applied Molecular Biology) GENETICS IMMUNOLOGY MICROBIOLOGY MOLECULAR BIOLOGY MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY HONOURS MANUAL 2006-2007 Name ...........................................................
  2. 2. 2
  3. 3. CONTENTS Honours Year - General Info: p Tutorials: p 5 59 Welcome The tutorial system Structure of the Honours Year and Timetable Tutorial topics The Role of the Honours Co-ordinators Project: p What to do if you have a problem or question 60 Responsibilities of Honours students and Laboratory/ Literature based research project Teaching staff (Safety in the laboratory) Honours Project list 2006-2007 Other useful information: About this Guide on laboratory or literature assessment manual; Points of contact; Seminars; Use of and laboratory notebook assessment the Library; Careers / Entrepeneurship information; Postgraduate studies; University Support; Staff contacts Thesis including “Instructions and Guidance Coursework Summary Form for authors” Attendance and Performance requirements Brief guidelines on writing conventions Class Representatives Assessment of thesis Mission statements; University and School; Timetable for projects Statement on Standards Expected for Students Project seminars and oral presentations Assessment: p Assessment forms for lab/ literature performance, 26 thesis and oral examination Submission of written work Essays: p Examinations 70 Marking Essays 1, 2 and 3: Submission dates and guidelines for essay titles Honours Degree Classification Plagiarism Course elements Titles for Essays 1 and 2 Requirements for the award of an Honours Degree Guide on essay writing Marking scheme Assessment of essays and assessment forms The Lecture Course: p 31 Research Tutorials: p List of modules for each course 79 Timetables for first semester Preparation Course synopses Evaluation forms 3
  4. 4. Tutorial Synopses Past Examination Papers: p 88 Papers 1 - 4 available at www.abdn.ac.uk/diss/library/examdb/ and WebCT Paper 5 ~ Data analysis ~ available from School office on request Plagiarism sheet (to be completed and handed in with all course work) This manual can also be found on WebCT (MB4050) 4
  5. 5. 5
  6. 6. WELCOME TO THE HONOURS COURSE We are pleased to welcome you into the Honours Course, the final year of your undergraduate programme. We believe that you will find this course stimulating and challenging. We know that you will have to work hard, and hope that you will see it as rewarding, even though this may only be with hindsight! The primary aim of our Honours teaching is to develop your powers of critical analysis and communication. By the end of the year it will have become second nature for you to structure your ideas and information such that there is an orderly development of the argument that you are presenting. Ultimately this involves the cross-referencing of information from different sources, eg reviews, lecture notes and original papers, and integrating the material around a central theme or set of themes. There are several ways in which we try to stimulate the development of these abilities: eg essays, seminars, project work. Regular tutorials act as an aid to the orderly revision of lecture material, the discussion of problems and the development of your understanding of your subject. Structure of the Honours Year The teaching in the Honours year involves fewer lectures and more input from you than in previous years. You will take 1 core course in Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology (45 hours) and 2 options modules, each of 15 contact hours comprising a mix of lectures, tutorials and seminars running over 3 weeks. Considerable additional reading on your part is needed to support both the core and options courses and is an integral part of the structure of the options modules. The options modules for each degree are fixed, with the exception of Biotechnology, where a mix of any two modules can be taken as long as they are in two different subject areas (Biochemistry, Microbiology, Genetics or Immunology). During the first semester you will also write three essays, which form part of the course continuous assessment. The research project, lasting 10 weeks, is undertaken in the second semester. Alongside the project run two research tutorials, where the scientific literature is carefully studied with the help of a member of staff acting as tutor. First and second semester material is examined in May. Honours continuous assessment and course work account for 7 elements of assessment, with formal examinations accounting for 17 elements out of a total of 24 elements of the degree assessment (see assessment section for more details). You will be kept busy throughout the year and it is important that you develop a well-structured plan for the optimal organisation of your time. The tasks to be completed are all important but none should be allowed to dominate your effort. You must learn to set priorities and to apportion a set time to any particular piece of work. When the time has elapsed, move on to the next task and accept that you cannot do everything perfectly. This is not, of course, a set of excuses to try to get by on the minimum of effort, which is not consistent with undertaking an Honours degree. A quick guide to the structure of the honours year is included in this section. A form on which you should summarise all your work, including essay titles etc, is enclosed. Please fill this in and hand it in with your thesis, the last piece of work submitted. The form is of particular help to the external examiners. 6
  7. 7. 7
  8. 8. TIMETABLE FOR 2006-2007 HONOURS Week Week beginning 11 18 September 2006 Kindrogan 21-22 September 06 12 25 September 2006 MB4050 Careers Talk (28 September 06) Advanced 13 02 October 2006 Option Molecular Library Visit (29 September 06) 14 9 October 2006 Course and Cell 15 16 October 2006 No. 1 Biology Essay 1 hand-in (17 October 06) 16 23 October 2006 Core 17 30 October 2006 Option Course 18 06 November 2006 Course 19 13 November 2006 No. 2 Essay 2 hand-in (15 November 06) 20 20 November 2006 21 27 November 2006 22 04 December 2006 Revision and assimilation Careers & Entrepreneurship talks 23 11 December 2006 time (date to be confirmed) (15TH END OF TERM ) Essay 3 hand-in (12 December 06) CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS 27 08 January 2007 28 15 January 2007 Laboratory Project 29 22 January 2007 (starts 15 January 07) 30 29 January 2007 Research tutorial advice session and 31 05 February 2007 Project thesis writing tutorial 32 12 February 2007 } 33 19 February 2007 } Research tutorial 1 34 26 February 2007 } 35 05 March 2007 } 36 12 March 2007 } Research tutorial 2 37 19 March 2007 Advice session ~ University } (23rd END OF TERM) Finish Lab Work by 16th March 07 Evaluation Form to be filled in Project Presentations (21-23 March 07 – to be confirmed) EASTER HOLIDAYS 41 16 April 2007 Project Thesis hand-in (18 April 07) (TERM BEGINS) 42 23 April 2007 43 30 April 2007 44 07 May 2007 Papers 1 and 2 (9th & 11th Exams (EXAM PERIOD BEGINS) May 07 – to be confirmed) 45 14 May 2007 Papers 3, 4 and 5 (14th, 16th Exams & 18th May 07) – to be confirmed 46 21 May 2007 47 28 May 2007 48 04 June 2007 Oral exams 6-8 June 07 (8th END OF TERM) (to be confirmed) 52 Thurs 5 July 2007 PROVISIONAL GRADUATION & SCHOOL GRADUATION RECEPTION 8
  9. 9. 9
  10. 10. THE ROLE OF THE HONOURS CO-ORDINATORS Welcome to your level 4 courses in the School of Medical Sciences. We are the level 4 Co-ordinators and are responsible for the administration of Honours courses within the disciplines of Biochemistry, Genetics, Immunology and Microbiology. You will also have a Module Organiser for each of the 2 options modules of the taught course, and you should approach them if you are having difficulties with a specific module. For all other issues, we are your main points of contact on the academic staff. We will also be available to discuss any general points relating to the modules. Please feel free to let us know about any problems, either directly or via your class representatives. It saves a lot of time if suggestions not requiring discussion, are made by leaving notes in our pigeon-holes/sending emails; the same route is often a useful first step in matters where you do want to discuss a problem. You can contact us either directly, BM in IMS room 2:18; tel 55826; KD in IMS room 4:30; tel 55769; AS in Polwarth room 4:015; tel 53006; or via Lucy Meldrum, in the School Office (IMS room 2.62.3, tel 55872). In our role as Honours Co-ordinators we are formally responsible for: • The smooth running of all Honours courses, including the essays, allocation of projects and tutors, teaching timetable, and dealing with any problems arising • Preparation and distribution of the course manual • Monitoring records of attendance, medical certificates and other reasons for absence • Recording any failure to hand in work on time and interviewing any student who fails to do so • The Assessment Form in this manual and the University Course Assessment Form you will receive at the end of each half-session. • Responding to suggestions for changes to the Honours courses. In practice, our duties are not limited by this list. We will do all we can to make your experience of the Honours year as happy and fruitful as possible. Remember that you also have an individual tutor (see Tutorial section), who is there to help you. Kevin Docherty, Berndt Mueller and Andy Schofield WHAT TO DO IF YOU HAVE PROBLEMS OR QUESTIONS ABOUT THE COURSE OR WISH TO SEE ONE OF THE HONOURS CO-ORDINATORS One of the Honours Co-ordinators will be available every Wednesday from 5.00–6.00pm throughout term time for consultations. You may book an appointment by signing up on the diary available from Lucy Meldrum in the School Office. These consultations will be held in the office of one of the co-ordinators. You should make every effort to restrict your enquiries to the Honours Co-ordinators to these allocated times unless it is an emergency. Remember that most of the information you will need about the course and the deadlines is in your manual. You may want to discuss other matters with your Tutor as your first port of call. Also, remember to direct any comments you may have on the course content and/or organisation to the relevant Class Representative who will channel your comments to the appropriate member of staff or Course Co-ordinator. 10
  11. 11. RESPONSIBILITIES OF HONOURS STUDENTS 1. You must ensure that you are available, without exception, during term time throughout the year to fulfil course requirements; this includes the post-exam period. 2. You must read the manual carefully and familiarise yourself with the contents. 3. You should establish a good working relationship with your Tutor, part of which will involve attendance at all tutorials scheduled. Remember that your Tutor and your Project Supervisor may be asked to speak on your behalf at the final Examiner’s Meeting in June. 4. You must bring any difficulties you are having with the course or any other problem that may affect your academic performance and progress to the attention of your Tutor immediately. 5. You must establish a rigorous programme of study and manage your time carefully. 6. You must meet deadlines without fail. 7. You must ensure that any absence from the course during term time is covered by a medical certificate which should be lodged with Lucy Meldrum in the School Office immediately upon return to study. Retrospective medical certificates will not be accepted. RESPONSIBILITIES OF TEACHING STAFF 1. Tutors must establish and maintain contact with their tutees throughout the year: they must bring any problems individual students are having to the attention of the Honours Co-ordinators (BM, KD, AS). 2. Teaching staff should encourage and seek to develop the full academic potential of every student. 3. Honours Project Supervisors should ensure that the students are adequately supervised and that progress during the project is monitored frequently. 4. Staff must discuss any changes to the Modules with the relevant Student Representative and the Honours Co-ordinators BEFORE making any changes. 11
  12. 12. HONOURS PROJECTS 2006-2007 PROJECT TITLE SUPERVISOR TUTOR BIOCHEMISTRY Chaudry, Samir Factors promoting genetic stability in E. coli Dr P McGlynn Prof N A Booth MacNeish, Kelly The role of chromatin remodelling in the Prof K Docherty Dr A Donaldson expression of the endogenous PDX1 gene in non-islet cells McCrimmon, Angela Food Microbes: The Good, The Bad & The Drs J Perkins / C Dr I J McEwan (library based) Beautiful! Fraser Paget, Jane The kinetics of hyphal gene regulation in Prof A J P Brown Dr B Mueller Candida albicans Shay, Gemma Biomarker discovery using proteomics Dr P Cash Prof N A Booth (Med Micro) Sheils, Emma Allosteric Regulation of Transcription by DNA Dr I J McEwan Dr A Donaldson binding BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES (MOLECULAR BIOLOGY) Liaros, Angela An analysis of the regulatory systems Dr A MacKenzie Dr I J McEwan controlling the expression of the MSX1 gene in the developing heart McClure, Christina Localisation and function of RNA processing Dr B Mueller Prof M C M Smith factors in animal model systems Morrison, Emma Mechanisms of fibrin stabilization to lysis Prof N A Booth Dr P van West BIOTECHNOLOGY Cheyne, Richard Isolation of fully human antibodies specific for Prof A J R Porter Prof F Odds peptide targets Tan, Pei Xin Building Blocks of the Cell Nucleus: Dr A Donaldson Prof N A R Gow Identifying Molecules that Position Chromosomes in the Nucleus GENETICS Kennedy, Stuart Biosynthesis and secretion of a novel SPFH Dr K I J Shennan Dr I Stansfield protein (mORF) McKenzie, Christopher Directional growth of Candida albicans Prof N A R Gow Prof D Shaw Rattray, Alexander Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism and MLST Profs D Shaw/ F Dr I Broadbent in Candida albicans Odds/ N A R Gow Reichmann, Judith Learning about colorectal cancer by studying Dr J Pettitt Dr A MacKenzie worms 12
  13. 13. 13
  14. 14. GENETICS (IMMUNOLOGY) Abdullah, Ahmad Do heparan proteoglycans act as signalling co- Dr W F Long Prof D Shaw (library based) receptors during HIV infection? Harman, Laura Does CD200/CD200R signalling bias the Dr J Liversidge (O) Prof N A R Gow Th1/Th2 balance in inflammation? Hector, Beverley Protein synthesis in yeast; mistakes on the Dr I Stansfield Dr I Broadbent assembly line Kastl, Lena Chemotherapy drug resistance in breast cancer Dr A C Schofield Dr I Stansfield Murdoch, Suzanne Bcl-2 involvement in CD69 induced Eosinophil Dr G Walsh Dr A MacKenzie apoptosis (M&T) MOLECULAR MICROBIOLOGY Molecular Basis of Antibiotic Resistance in Prof I R Booth Dr P van West Shewring, Dawn Bacteria Med Mic = Medical Microbiology; M&T = Medicine & Therapeutics; O = Ophthalmology This Manual This manual is designed to give you all the information you will need. We have tried to make it complete but accept that you may identify some omissions (please let us know of these). It is structured so that all information on one topic, e.g. Projects or Essays, is together. There are a number of important general issues that are dealt with in this introductory section. We also need some information from you. We ask you to fill in a registration form with local and home addresses and telephone numbers. It is essential that the information we have is up-to-date, so do not forget to advise us of changes. Also for safety reasons, we must make sure that you have read the Safety Manual before you are allowed to start your project 14
  15. 15. Points of Contact Messages for individuals will be left in the Honours Class pigeon hole (round the corner from the School Office, Room 2:62.3). Messages for the class as a whole will also be sent to University e-mail addresses; this facility depends on your giving us details of your e-mail number. Please do not delay in giving us this information (see Registration Form). It is your responsibility to check these sources of information. All important notices will be sent by e-mail; check these frequently [emails will be sent to your University email account, not any hotmail.com etc accounts you might have]. Seminars The School of Medical Sciences runs a seminar programme with research seminars that focus on topics in Microbiology, Cell and Developmental Biology and Immunology. These seminars normally take place on Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays. In addition a high profile Institute of Medical sciences seminar programme will bring well-known speakers to Aberdeen. These seminars take normally place each, on a Wednesday. All seminars are widely advertised and you are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars. Immunology degree programme students are also expected to attend the Aberdeen Immunological Association Seminar series. These are widely advertised throughout the IMS and are usually held twice a month at 12:30pm on a Thursday. As well as their research content, well-presented Research Seminars are clear lessons on how to present complex data in a form readily assimilated by non-experts, and are useful for picking up tips on how to present your own seminars. They also give you a feel for science research as a career option. You are also welcome to attend any seminar series offered by other departments; information on these will be circulated throughout the IMS. Use of the Library Students should make themselves aware of all the services available in the University library, including use of the CD-ROM system. The Library staff have agreed to give a seminar and tour for you, attendance at which is compulsory. This will be on Friday 29th September. From 10:30-11:30am, the whole class will attend a library information session commencing in the Library Project Room. For the computer classroom part of the session, the class will be divided as follows – 29.09.06 1:30-2:30pm ~ Genetics, Genetics (Immun), Immunology, Micro, Molecular Micro 29.09.06 3:00-4:00pm ~ Biochem, Biochem (Immun), Molecular Biology, BMS (Molecular Bio), Biotech You will be provided with one photocopy card (which can be collected from the School Office), sufficient for 140 copies. Further cards can be purchased from the School Office (£6.00). Focus on Careers On Thursday 28th September, Peter Fantom from the University Careers Service will give a talk on careers at 10:00am in the Foresterhill Lecture Theatre for all Honours students. In December 06/ January 07 there will be a visit from industry representatives. They provide a forum where interested undergraduates and postgraduates can hear about opportunities for jobs as industrial scientists. A group of scientists representing a range of industries will present short talks on the work of scientists in their companies, together with a question and answer session. There may be an opportunity for you to have a one-to-one meeting with the visitors. The School office will contact you nearer the time with details. This is a great opportunity for all students to hear about careers in industry from people already engaged in one. 15
  16. 16. Post-Graduate Study Many of our graduates go on to become research students either here in Aberdeen or in other universities. If you are interested in the possibility of studying for a PhD, discuss the position early in the year with Duncan Shaw, the Postgraduate Supervisor, Berndt Mueller, Kevin Docherty or Andy Schofield, the Honours co- ordinators, in the first instance. We can usually suggest suitable departments in other universities for you to approach. Early application is recommended if you wish to be considered for quota Research Council Awards or if special application (eg for CASE or University Studentships) is to be made on your behalf. Should you have any queries regarding availability of funding for study please enquire in the Graduate School, College Office (Christine Bain: ext 59970), about Postgraduate admissions. Entry to the IMS Entry can be gained by using your Student ID Card. University Support In addition to the academic advice that your supervisor, tutor and all academic staff can give you, it may be that you require additional professional help. The University has a Counselling service, which provides personal support. There is also advice available on financial problems. University Counselling Service Tel: 27-2139 William Guild Building, Old Aberdeen Money Advice Centre for Students Tel: 27-2965 c/o SRC Office, Room 23 Luthuli House, 50/52 College Bounds, Old Aberdeen 16
  17. 17. STAFF CONTACTS Teaching Staff E-mail Office Room Lab Lab …….@abdn.ac.uk Ext Number Ext Room No Booth, Prof Ian R i.r.booth 55852 5:30 55851 6:51 Booth, Prof Nuala A n.a.booth 55818 3:17 54575 1:32/1:33 Brown, Prof Alistair JP al.brown 55883 3:25 55888 2:50 Connolly, Dr Bernadette b.connolly 55825 4:31 55922 4:59 Cumming, Mr Alastair a.cumming 55722 5:16 - 6:55 Docherty, Prof Kevin k.docherty 55769 4:30 55830 4:42/4:43 Donaldson, Dr Anne a.d.donaldson 50975 2:17 55770 2:01 Glover, Prof L Anne l.a.glover 55799 2:32 55800 2:39/2:40 Gow, Prof Neil AR n.gow 55879 3:26 55878 2:50 Long, Dr Bill F * w.f.long (76)4175 Ed Wr - - Anx G01 MacKenzie, Dr Alasdair Alasdair.mackenzie 55893 5:27 55922 4:59 McEwan, Dr Iain J iain.mcewan 55807 2:34 55810 2:06 McGlynn, Dr Peter p.mcglyn 55183 2:31 55770 2:01 Mueller, Dr Berndt b.mueller 55826 2:18 55887 2:04 Odds, Prof Frank f.odds 55828 3:27 59536 2:50 Perkins, Dr Joy j.perkins 51934 5:17 - - Pettitt, Dr Jonathan j.pettitt 55737 4:38 55922 4:59 Porter, Prof Andy JR a.porter 55870 5:31 59482 SS1 Schofield, Dr Andy** a.schofield 53006 4:015 - WFR1/2/6 Shaw, Prof Duncan d.shaw 55891 6:21 - 6:55 Shennan, Dr Kathy IJ k.i.shennan 55827 2:20 55810 2:06 Smith, Prof Maggie maggie.smith 55739 5:32 55794 6:58 Stansfield, Dr Ian i.stansfield 55806 2:19 55887 2:04 Wright, Dr Matthew C m.c.wright 55880 3:16 55830 4:42 Crane, Dr Isabel i.j.crane 53783 5:19 Liversidge, Dr Janet j.liversidge 59548 4:22 Sternberg, Dr Jerry*** j.sternberg (76)2272 308 Walsh, Dr Garry g.m.walsh 54533 4:19 Ward, Dr Frank f.j.ward 55948 4:63 * based in Edward Wright Annexe ** based in Polwarth Building ***based in Zoology Building School Co-ordinator Maureen Carr (e-mail: m.carr@abdn.ac.uk) 55871 Rm 2:62.1 IMS Senior Secretary Lucy Meldrum (e-mail: l.meldrum@abdn.ac.uk) 55872 Rm 2:62.3 IMS Secretary Jill Reid (e-mail: jill.reid@abdn.ac.uk) 55717 Rm 2:62.3 IMS Safety Mrs Diane Massie 55922 Dr Kath Shennan 55827 DIALING Internal from IMS to Old Aberdeen: 76 + ext no (last 4 digits):: from IMS to IMS/ Polwarth: 5 digit ext no (beginning with 5) from Old Aberdeen to Foresterhill: 76 + 5 digit ext no (e.g. 76 55xxx) External to Old Aberdeen: 27 + ext no (last 4 digits) to IMS/ Polwarth: 5 + 5 digit ext no (beginning with 5) 17
  18. 18. 18
  19. 19. HONOURS COURSEWORK SUMMARY NAME DISCIPLINE TUTOR PROJECT SUPERVISOR CORE MODULES ADVANCED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OPTION MODULE 1 OPTION MODULE 2 PROJECT TITLE ESSAY 1 ESSAY 2 ESSAY 3 This form is required by the External Examiners. Please complete and submit with your thesis. 19
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  21. 21. ATTENDANCE AND PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS: Students are expected to attend ALL lectures, tutorial and practical classes and to submit ALL written assignments by the specified time. Attendance and submission information will be recorded. ABSENCE FROM CLASSES ON MEDICAL GROUNDS Candidates who wish to establish that their academic performance has been adversely affected by their health are required to secure medical certificates relating to the relevant periods of ill health (see General Regulation 17.3). The University’s policy on requiring certification for absence on medical grounds or other good cause can be accessed at: www.abdn.ac.uk/registry/quality/appendix7x5.pdf You are strongly advised to make yourself fully aware of your responsibilities if you are absent due to illness or other good cause. In particular, you are asked to note that self-certification of absence for periods of absence up to and including eleven weekdays is permissible. However, where absence has prevented attendance at an examination or where it may have affected your performance in an element of assessment or where you have been unable to attend a specified teaching session, you are strongly advised to provide medical certification (see section 3 of the Policy on Certification of Absence for Medical Reasons or Other Good Cause). Medical certificates are to be submitted to the School Office immediately on return to classes after an absence or non-submission of assignments due to medical reasons. The School reserves the right to reject medical certificates issued or submitted an excessive time after the period of absence. Other reasons for absence or non-submission of assignments must be presented in writing to the School Office. Students who do not present adequate reasons for failure to submit written work on time will be awarded zero marks for the assignment concerned. MONITORING STUDENTS’ PROGRESS The University operates a system for monitoring students' progress to identify students who may be experiencing difficulties in a particular course and who may be at risk of losing their class certificate. If the Course Co-ordinator has concerns about your attendance and/or performance, the Registry will be informed. The Registry will then write to you (by e-mail in term-time) to ask you to contact their office in the first instance. Depending on your reason for absence, the Registry will either deal directly with your case or will refer you to your Adviser of Studies or a relevant Support Service. This system is operated to provide support for students who may be experiencing difficulties with their studies. Students are required to attend such meetings with their Adviser of Studies in accordance with General Regulation 8. Set criteria are used to determine when a student should be reported in the monitoring system. You will be asked to meet your Adviser if any of the following criteria apply for this course:- ‘either (i) if you are absent for a continuous period of two weeks or 25% of the course (whichever is less) without good cause being reported; or (ii) if you are absent from two small group teaching sessions (e.g. tutorial, laboratory class) without good cause; or (iii) if you fail to submit a piece of summative or a substantial piece of formative in-course assessment by the stated deadline' If you fail to respond within the prescribed timescale (as set out in the e-mail or letter), you will be deemed to have withdrawn from the course concerned and will accordingly be ineligible to take the end-of-course assessment or to enter for the resit. The Registry will write to you (by e-mail in term-time) to inform you of 21
  22. 22. this decision. If you wish consideration to be given to reinstating you in the course you will require to meet with the Convener of the Students' Progress Committee. CLASS CERTIFICATES A class certificate is defined as “a certificate confirming that a candidate has attended and duly performed the work prescribed for a course”. The period of validity for a class certificate is limited to the academic year in which it is awarded and the academic year immediately following. Hence, candidates have a maximum of four opportunities to take the end-of-course assessment without re-attendance i.e. the normal (January or May) diet and the August resit diet in the year in which the course is taken and the year immediately following. Students who have been reported as ‘at risk’ through the system for monitoring students’ progress due to their failure to satisfy the minimum criteria (as outlined above) may be refused a class certificate. If you are refused a class certificate, you will receive a letter from the Registry (e-mail in term-time) notifying you of this decision. Students who are refused a class certificate are withdrawn from the course and cannot take the prescribed degree assessment in the current session, nor are eligible to be re-assessed next session, unless and until they qualify for the award of a class certificate by taking the course again in the next session. If you wish to appeal against the decision to refuse a class certificate should do so in writing to the Head of School within fourteen days of the date of the letter/e-mail notifying you of the decision. If your appeal is unsuccessful, you have the right to lodge an appeal with the relevant Director of Undergraduate Programmes within fourteen days of the date you are informed of the Head of School’s decision. As this course forms part of an Honours programme, you should be aware that if you are refused a class certificate, you will be awarded the equivalent of a No Paper (NP) for the course, i.e. a CAS mark of zero when applied to the Grade Spectrum used for determining degree classification. This will mean that, normally, you would be unable to gain a higher class of degree than Lower Second Class Honours. IF YOU WISH TO CHANGE YOUR CURRICULUM: YOU MUST OBTAIN THE APPROVAL OF YOUR ADVISER AS SOON AS POSSIBLE AND TELL THE DEPARTMENT/SCHOOL CONCERNED. CLASS REPRESENTATIVES We value student’s opinions in regard to enhancing the quality of teaching and its delivery; therefore in conjunction with the Students Association we support the operation of a Class representative system. The students within each course, year, or programme elect representatives by the end of the fourth week of teaching within each half-session. In this course we operate a system of year representatives. Any students registered within a year that wishes to represent a given group of students can stand for election as a class representative. You will be informed when the elections for class representative will take place. What will it involve? It will involve speaking to your fellow students about the year you represent. This can include any comments that they may have. You will attend a Staff Student Liaison Committee and you should represent the views and concerns of the students within this meeting. As a representative you will also be able to contribute to the agenda. You then feedback to the students after this meeting with any actions that are being taken. Training Training for class representatives will be run by the Students Association in conjunction with SPARQS (Student Participation in Quality Scotland). Training will take place in the fourth or fifth week of teaching each semester. For more information about the Class representative system visit www.ausa.org.uk or email 22
  23. 23. the VP Education & Employability vped@abdn.ac.uk . For further information on class representation and student involvement in Quality visit www.sparqs.org.uk MISSION STATEMENTS THE UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN MISSION STATEMENT The University of Aberdeen aims to create, develop, apply and transmit through the work of all its members, knowledge, skills and understanding at the highest levels of excellence. SCHOOL OF MEDICAL SCIENCES (MCB) MISSION STATEMENT 1. Provide high quality educational programmes which stimulate and foster interest and enthusiasm in Biochemistry, Genetics, Immunology and Microbiology and provide a training for a career in these and related disciplines. 2. Encourage and support the dissemination of research in Biochemistry, Genetics, Immunology and Microbiology through publications and participation in conferences. 3. Promote and develop excellent research programmes in pure and applied aspects of Biochemistry, Genetics, Immunology and Microbiology and encourage collaboration within the University and, externally, with industry and government research institutes. 4. Develop and provide high quality programmes of training and development for research staff. 5. Encourage and facilitate training for academic staff to optimise their teaching and research skills and performance. AIMS With regard to education, we aim to: 1. continue to provide courses and Degree programmes in Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Genetics, Immunology, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Biomedical Sciences which are attractive to students and provide high quality education in these topics; 2. provide the conditions and facilities which optimise the potential for students to gain an understanding and appreciation of Biochemistry, Genetics, Immunology and Microbiology; 3. foster and encourage curiosity, originality, creativity and critical appraisal associated with the study of Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Genetics, Immunology, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Biomedical Sciences in particular and scientific study in general; 4. maintain and develop procedures for entry of mature and other non-standard students to undergraduate courses and Degree programmes in Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Genetics, Immunology, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Biomedical Sciences; 5. encourage the development of personal and transferable skills to equip students for careers and situations which are not specific to their chosen subject; 6. optimise the allocation and utilisation of resources to maintain the facilities required for delivery of high quality teaching; 7. provide the facilities and procedures necessary for continual review and modification of aims, curricula and course content necessary to achieve the above aims, including seeking and considering the opinions of students and extra-departmental experts; 8. provide an atmosphere and procedures which make the learning process enjoyable, stimulating and challenging; OBJECTIVES AND LEARNING OUTCOMES 23
  24. 24. We intend that students attending our courses and Degree programmes should: 1. acquire factual, up-to-date knowledge and practical skills required for a career in Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Genetics, Immunology, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Biomedical Sciences; 2. for students taking Degree courses outwith the School of Medical Sciences , acquire the fundamental factual knowledge and understanding of Biochemistry, Genetics, Immunology and Microbiology required for their particular Degrees; 3. develop personal transferable skills required for scientific study, including numeracy, information retrieval, computer literacy, presentation skills, group work, essay and thesis writing; 5. develop general conceptual skills, including problem solving, creative and original thought, hypothesis generation and testing, interpretation and critical evaluation of experimental data and published work. SUBJECT SPECIFIC STANDARDS EXPECTED FOR STUDENTS COMPLETING HONOURS COURSES IN BIOCHEMISTRY, GENETICS, IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY (a) Biochemistry (BC4012), Biochemistry (Immunology) (BC4013), Biotechnology (BT4005), Genetics (GN4007), Genetics (Immunology) (GN4008), Microbiology (MC4012), Molecular Microbiology (MC4013), Molecular Biology (MB4004), Biomedical Sciences (Molecular Biology) (BM4008), Immunology (IM4002) The aims of the course are to enable students: (a) to establish a knowledge of aspects of advanced molecular and cell biology, including protein structure and function, the regulation of gene expression, genome organisation and analysis, and development and form at the cell and whole organism level. (b) to establish a knowledge at advanced level of specific aspects of biochemistry, microbiology, immunology or genetics appropriate to the degree course being studied. The core course-specific learning outcomes are such that, at the end of the course, students should be able to: (a) describe the current state of understanding of molecular genetics, in the context of genome structure and evolution, using data emerging from the microbial and eukaryote genome sequencing projects; understand methods and approaches being used to understand function of novel genes. (b) understand major principles that determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins, evolution of proteins, how evolution has shaped protein structure and function, the contribution of structure to function, and the physical and chemical constraints on protein structure and function. (c) describe the processes and mechanisms determining bacterial, yeast and animal gene expression (using specific examples), ranging from transcription regulation to mRNA degradation. Students will be aware of the role of control of gene expression in the context of differentiation, development and the adaptation to changes in the environment. (d) understand the ways in which cells and groups of cells in tissues establish shape, polarity and undergo morphogenesis, giving an overview of how form and function is generated at the cell and molecular level, and how form contributes to function. Students will be aware of the contribution of cell morphogenesis to the generation of diversity of forms in complete simple and complex cellular life forms. The subject-specific learning outcomes are such that, at the end of the course; Biochemistry students and those students combining either of the two biochemistry options should be able to: 24
  25. 25. For Option 1 (Receptors and Cell Signalling) and Essay 1 (RNA catalysis and modification) (a) describe using examples from specific families of receptors, the ways in which receptor proteins transmit information from the extra-cellular environment to the intracellular site of action and the mechanisms by which cross-talk between different signalling pathways can be achieved. (b) Describe the role of rRNA and tRNA molecules in gene expression; understand RNA-based catalysis and the role of RNA modifications. For Option 2 (Mechanisms of Human Disease) and Essay 2 (Nucleo-cytoplasmic transport) (a) use examples of key infectious human diseases to analyse the molecular mechanisms underlying the subversion and exploitation of the biochemistry of the human host; describe the nature of the disease- causing agents and their how their activities contribute to pathogenicity at the molecular level. (b) understand the molecular basis of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, a fundamental cell biological process. Microbiology students and those students combining either of the two microbiology options should be able to: For Option 1 (Molecular Genetic Evolution in Micro-organisms) and Essay 1 (Microbiology) (a) using well studied microbial groups the students will gain understanding of the molecular methods used to analyse species formation in microorgansims and of the insights gained by these approaches. (b) describe, using a range of examples, the complexities of the molecular basis of host-microbe interactions, and their relevance to symbiosis and pathogenicity For Option 2 (Antibiotic Synthesis and Resistance) and Essay 2 (Microbiology) (a) describe the molecular principles that underlie the molecular mechanisms of resistance to antimicrobial compounds or the development and evolution of resistance to anti-microbial drugs. (b) describe the theory and importance of metabolic flux in bacteria, and the importance of genome sequencing in anti-microbial drug design. Genetics students and those students combining either of the two genetics options should be able to: For Option 1 (Human Medical Genetics) and Essay 1 (Dynamic Genomes) (a) describe the role of cytogenetics in gene mapping and identification of congenital defects; understand the role of animal models in elucidating the role of the gene products and the role of epigenetic phenomenon in modifying gene expression. Lastly, the student will be able to describe the operation and workings of a DNA Diagnostic laboratory. The student will be aware of the ethical dimension to diagnosis of human medical conditions. (b) understand the forces, both directed and random, that shape the formation and reformation of genomes, including transposon activity, and examples of programmed genome re-arrangements. For Option 2 (Population Genetics) and Essay 2 (Genetic Analysis) (a) understand how population genetic composition is controlled by mutation rates and selection, how human genetic disease incidence is directed by genetic epidemiological factors including gene polymorphism-phenotype association; describe the relationship of population structure to evolutionary history. (b) analyse the role of modern molecular genetic methodologies in genome analysis, genetic disease diagnosis and forensics. Immunology students and those students combining the immunology option should be able to: For Option 1 (Infection, Immunity and Inflammation) and Essay 1 (Immunology) 25
  26. 26. a) understand and describe the interaction of cells cytokines chemokines and other immune mediators that regulate leucocyte trafficking and migration during inflammation and how these processes may lead to autoimmune or allergic disease. b) describe the complex cellular and molecular processes underlying the co-ordinated series of events linking the innate and adaptive immune response to infection. c) understand how modern imaging technologies and emerging disciplines such as immuno- epidemiology can be used to understand molecular and cellular processes underlying disease. For Option 2 (Molecular Immunology) and Essay 2 (Immunology) (a) describe the human adaptive immune response and the role inheritance genes of the immune system play in disease susceptibility; and how immunological homeostaisis is maintained by regulatory cells, and how immunological dysfunction can lead to disease. (b) understand how specialized antigen receptors of T and B lymphocytes function to induce immunity, tolerance or disease. (c) describe the role of phage display technologies in elucidating immuno-generic repertoires and understand the contribution of MHC structure to its function in T cell recognition. In addition, for all students, intellectual skills consolidated comprise: (a) recognition that for all cell types, from prokaryotes and archaea to higher eukaryote cells, form and phenotype, and dynamic processes such as development and evolution, are governed ultimately by the physical and chemical properties of the molecular components of cells, principally proteins and nucleic acids. (b) ability to apply subject-specific knowledge and understanding to address problems in molecular and cell biology Practical skills advanced comprise: (a) ability to search for and access bioscience literature resources using Web-based search programs (b) ability to use protein and nucleic acid search and comparison algorithms; (c) ability to communicate effectively in writing in the form of essays and the Honours thesis. Numeracy and communication skills are encouraged by opportunities to: (a) analyse literature-derived numerical data and discuss scientific papers during tutorials; (b) verbally address topics during tutorials; Interpersonal and teamwork skills are encouraged by opportunities to: (a) work productively with others in tutorials and class computer program tutorials; (b) recognise and respect the views and opinions of others during tutorials; Self management skills are needed in: (a) balancing the various demands of this and other courses you are studying. For the following course codes; (b) Biochemistry (BC4512), Biochemistry (Immunology) (BC4513), Biotechnology (BT4505), Genetics (GN4507), Genetics (Immunology) (GN4508), Microbiology (MC4512), Molecular Microbiology (MC4513), Molecular Biology (MB4504), Biomedical Sciences (Molecular Biology) (BM4508), Immunology (IM4502) The aims of these courses are to enable students: (a) to develop practical research expertise by undertaking a laboratory research project, a literature research project, or a computer-based bioinformatics-type project. (b) to establish a knowledge, at advanced level, of specific aspects of biochemistry, genetics, immunology or microbiology appropriate to the student's degree title, through study of the scientific literature. 26
  27. 27. The subject-specific learning outcomes are such that, at the end of the course. Biochemistry and related students should be able to: (a) describe, understand and evaluate suitable experimental approaches appropriate to the study of DNA repair recombination and replication. (b) describe, understand and evaluate suitable experimental approaches appropriate to such fundamental cell biological processes as secretion, and vesicle trafficking Microbiology and related students should be able to: (a) describe, understand and evaluate suitable experimental approaches appropriate to the study of cell motor proteins such as kinesins, and the dynamic processes they participate in, and describe our current understanding of kinesin structure/function relationships in different fungal species. (b) describe, understand and evaluate suitable experimental approaches appropriate to the study of molecular epidemiology, and describe our current understanding of epidemiology of bacterial pathogens. Genetics and related students should be able to: (a) describe, understand and evaluate approaches for studying the evolution and history of human populations, based on molecular genetic analysis; gain an appreciation, in outline form, of the mathematical techniques used for this analysis. (b) describe, understand and evaluate suitable experimental approaches appropriate to the study of complex phenotypes such as schizophrenia, and describe our current understanding of schizophrenia aetiology. Immunology and related students should be able to: a) Demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of immunology at the cellular, molecular and physiological levels, and show an appreciation of the importance of immunology in medicine, agriculture, biotechnology and industry. b) Apply their knowledge and skills acquired during the course to the solution of practical and theoretical problems and be able to proceed to further studies in specialised areas of immunology or multi- disciplinary areas involving immunology. c) Describe, understand and critically appraise experimental approaches appropriate to the study of molecular and cellular immunology in health and disease. In addition, intellectual skills consolidated comprise: (a) ability to carry out research, derive results, process these and using this information, to design subsequent experiments (b) ability to reach justifiable and logical conclusions based upon acquisition of primary research data. (c) ability to apply subject-specific knowledge and understanding to address problems (during tutorials); Practical skills advanced comprise: (a) in the case of literature research projects, the ability to search for specific literature resources using Web-based search programs (b) in the case of bioinformatic research projects, the ability to use protein and nucleic acid search and comparison algorithms; (c) in the case of lab-based research projects, the ability to undertake specific project specific techniques and protocols. (d) generally, the ability to plan, execute, and present the results of a 9 week project (e) the ability to place the results of that project in context, and suggest further lines of investigation. Numeracy and communication skills are encouraged by opportunities to: (a) analyse literature-derived numerical data and discuss scientific papers during tutorials; (b) verbally address topics during tutorials; 27
  28. 28. (c) processing and manipulation of data derived from the research project (d) presentation of research project data to lab. research meetings, and as part of the Honours thesis presentation exercise. Interpersonal and teamwork skills are encouraged by opportunities to: (a) work productively with others in tutorials and research groups; (b) recognise and respect the views and opinions of others during tutorials and research lab. meetings. Self management skills are needed in: (a) balancing the various demands of this and other courses you are studying. HONOURS ASSESSMENT Submission of written work All written work (theses, essays) must be submitted to the School Office (not to individual staff members). The submission of your work will be recorded and distribution to members of staff undertaken. You are responsible for recovering the work, again from the office, once the marking process is complete. It is vital that the deadlines given are adhered to. Submit an incomplete piece of work rather than miss a deadline. Work not submitted on time will not be accepted unless accompanied by either a medical certificate or a written explanation justifying this Deadlines are: 17.10.06 Essay 1 (3 copies) (hand in completed plagiarism sheet with essay) 15.11.06 Essay 2 (3 copies) (hand in completed plagiarism sheet with essay) 12.12.06 Essay 3 (3 copies) (hand in completed plagiarism sheet with essay) 18.04.07 Thesis (2 copies) (hand in completed work sheet with thesis) Examinations Five papers are taken in May. The exams will comprise three 3 hour papers, one on the Advanced Molecular Biology core course (Paper 1; answer 2 questions from 4 in section A, 2 questions from 4 in section B), another on the options lecture course (Paper 2; 2 sections with 3 questions each, answer 2 questions per section); and the third will examine the research tutorials material (paper 3, 3 hours; 4 questions, no choice). One 2 hour paper and one 4 hour paper, test general essay writing (paper 4, 2 hours; write two essays from a choice of 10) and data analysis skills (paper 5, 4 hours; no choice of question). The Data Analysis paper will have the following format: • There will be one common paper for all students, relying on common elements of the course. • At the start of the examination each student will be handed a slightly modified copy of a research paper from which the title, abstract, discussion and references have been deleted and the examination paper. • You should set aside 30 minutes at the start of the exam to study the paper and make notes. • At the end of the 30 minutes each student should answer the questions in the exam paper from their own knowledge of their discipline and from the information in the research paper they have studied. • The paper contains three sections: Section A is primarily concerned with the Methods section of the research paper; Section B is primarily concerned with analysis of the results presented in the paper, but may also call for interpretation and for suggestions for further experimentation; 28
  29. 29. Section C requires that the student suggest, in response to specific questions, ways in which the research described in the paper could be extended in future. The student is also required to write a 150 word scientific summary of the paper. • Students will be allowed a total of 4 h for the Data Analysis exam. • Students will not be allowed to remove the examination papers from the examination room. • Students are permitted to bring a calculator to the examination. The examination timetable will be posted on student portals and emailed to all students, as soon as it is available. Marking Marking of examination scripts is carried out on coded scripts, so that the identity of the student is unknown to the marker. Please co-operate in this by giving no information that would identify you on your examination scripts; only your student ID number is necessary. Marking is carried out independently by two members of staff, and marks agreed if they differ. A copy of the CAS (Common Assessment Scale) scheme used is included in this section. All work (continuous assessment and examinations) will be marked using this scale, and you will be told the CAS marks attained in your written submissions (essays, etc.). All work is marked by two members of staff, using the same rules of agreement as for examination scripts. Detailed information on how laboratory performance, theses and project seminars and examination are assessed is included in the Project section. Similarly, there is specific information on assessment of essays in the relevant section of the manual. Oral examination and interviews Once papers 1-5 are done the examination process is not complete. You may be called for an oral examination (viva), where you will meet the external examiner accompanied by an internal examiner. These will take place on either 7th or 8th June. This is officially term time, and you have a duty to be available at that time. Please make sure therefore that you are in Aberdeen and in contact with the School Office. A list of candidates to be examined will be put up outside the office as early as possible that week, as soon as we have the agreement of the external examiners. This list will make clear who is being asked for a viva because their performance is borderline for a particular degree class (you may not want to know that, but it is a current University regulation). In addition to this, the external examiners will want to meet (interview) some students in order to assess how good the courses are, how well the students enjoyed the courses. If your are asked for a viva because you are borderline, try not to be nervous (!), and definitely do not be despondent; a viva is a great opportunity to go up a degree classification, since students are asked if their marks lie close to, but below, a particular borderline between two degree classes. A good viva performance will impress the external examiner, who may recommend you be pushed up a grade. Remember that this is an opportunity to improve and that your grades cannot go down. External examiners often like to talk about your project - you should be able to give an informed account of what you did, what it all means, and what the background is. Externals also often ask what you enjoyed most on the course - i.e. an opening to talk about a molecular and cell biology subject that enthuses you. A bad thing to do is to suggest a favourite subject, and then 'dry up', not having revised it - pick a subject beforehand, and prepare it well so you can talk about it, again in an informed way. You should expect a range of questions over different parts of the course. If you know that you did badly in a particular area during the exams, revise that part. 29
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  31. 31. Honours Degree Classification All Honours Degrees are classified using the University’s Grade Spectrum which is available at http://www.abdn.ac.uk/registry/quality/appendix7x4.pdf. The Grade Spectrum, an extract of which is outlined below, is used to determine degree classification on the basis of the CAS mark awarded for each element of Honours Degree Assessment. First: Marks at 18 or better in elements constituting half the total elements; and Marks at 15 or better in elements constituting three quarters of the total elements; and Normally marks at 12 or better in all elements. 2i: Marks at 15 or better in elements constituting half the total elements; and Marks at 12 or better in elements constituting three quarters of the total elements; and Normally marks at 9 or better in all elements. 2ii: Marks at 12 or better in elements constituting half the total elements; and Marks at 9 or better in elements constituting three quarters of the total elements. Third: Marks at 9 or better in elements constituting three quarters of the total elements. The Grade Spectrum defines the threshold standards against which the different classes of honours degree are awarded. The Examiners, however, have discretion (in the circumstances defined in Note 4 of the Grade Spectrum) to depart from this and may choose to award a higher degree than that indicated by the Grade Spectrum. The course elements used to determine honours classifications are: Individual questions in Paper 1 1 element per question answered, 4 elements in total Individual questions in Paper 2 1 element per question answered, 4 elements in total Individual questions in Paper 3 1 element per question answered, 4 elements in total Individual questions in Paper 4 1 element per question answered, 2 elements in total Paper 5 (Data analysis) 3 elements in total Project: Laboratory work 1 element Thesis 2 elements Project seminar and oral examination 1 element Individual essays (Essays 1, 2 and 3) 3 elements in total Total elements 24 Note that assessment of the honours degree programmes is summarised in 3 final marks: One for the core course (Paper 1 and essay 3), one for the options module (Paper 2 and essays 1 and 2), and a third mark for the honours project, the written thesis, the thesis defence and papers 3, 4 and 5. Credit Requirements for the award of an honours degree. All students who are admitted to an Honours programme, in or after 2004/05, will be required to achieve 480 credit points, including at least 180 at levels 3 and 4, of which at least 90 must be at level 4. This change to the requirements for the award of an Honours Degree was made by the Senate to ensure that Honours degrees are awarded in compliance with the Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework (SCQF). Further information is available at www.scqf.org.uk. Accordingly, students failing to meet this credit requirement at the first attempt will require to make up this credit shortfall before graduating. How this can be achieved is summarised below. Note that in these degree programmes “element” refers to one of the 3 final course marks, and not to a single element of 31
  32. 32. assessment. In case that one of these course marks is a fail, candidates may have to resit relevant exams for a degree to be awarded. Note that this, except in case of illness or other good cause, will only result in the award of sufficient credits, but will not affect the degree classification. General Regulation 21, as outlined below, sets out the procedures available to enable students to make up this credit shortfall. In the case of a candidate who has failed to complete satisfactorily an element of Honours degree assessment1 at the time prescribed by Regulation 9.3, then the appropriate procedure from (a) to (e) below shall apply: a) If, but only if, the failure is on account of illness or other good cause, the candidate shall be required to submit themselves for assessment at the next available opportunity, and shall be permitted to count the result of that assessment towards Honours classification. b) If the failure is the result of absence or non-submission for any other cause, the candidate shall be awarded zero for the assessment concerned and shall be required to submit themselves for assessment at the next available opportunity, but shall not be permitted to count the result of that assessment towards Honours classification. c) For courses at level 4 and above only, if the candidate has completed the assessment but been awarded a mark on the Common Assessment Scale between 6 and 8 inclusive, they shall be awarded the same amount of unnamed specific credit, not exceeding 30 credit points in total, at level 1. d) If the candidate has completed the assessment, but the course is at level 3, or the course is at level 4 or above and the mark awarded on the Common Assessment Scale is less than 6, the candidate shall be required to submit themselves for assessment at the next available opportunity, but shall not be permitted to count the result of that assessment towards Honours classification. Alternatively, for courses at level 4 and above only, such candidates may elect to attend and submit themselves for assessment in another course or courses of equivalent credit value, which may be at any level. e) If any of options (a), (b) or (d) above would normally apply, but medical advice indicates that it would be unreasonable to require a candidate to appear for assessment on a subsequent occasion, and if the candidate’s past record provides sufficient evidence that they would have obtained Honours, the examiners may recommend the award of an Aegrotat degree, but only after obtaining the consent of the candidate. The award of an Aegrotat degree will debar candidates from counting towards Honours degree assessment any result achieved thereafter. Notes (i) For courses at level 4 and above, the timing and format of the assessment required under any of sub-sections (a), (b) or (d) above shall be determined by the Academic Standards Committee (Undergraduate) on the recommendation of the Head of the relevant School. (ii) The options to achieve or be awarded credit under (b), (c) and (d) above shall not be available to candidates who have accumulated less than 90 credit points at level 4 or who have failed to complete satisfactorily the assessment for a course which, on the recommendation of the Head of the relevant School, has been prescribed by the Academic Standards Committee (Undergraduate) as compulsory for the award of a degree with Honours. Such candidates will be able to qualify for a non-Honours degree only. Further guidance is also available in the Guidance Note for Students who either Fail, or who Fail to Attend or Complete, an Element of Prescribed Degree Assessment which can be accessed at: http://www.abdn.ac.uk/registry/quality/appendix7x6.pdf 1 Note that “element” refers to one of the 3 final course marks, and not to a single element of the 24 elements of assessment. 32
  33. 33. SCHOOL OF MEDICAL SCIENCES (MOLECULAR & CELL BIOLOGY) LEVEL 3 AND 4 MARKING SCHEME AND PERCENTAGE/CAS CONVERSION STUDENTS SHOULD NOTE THAT SPECIFIC FORMS ARE USED FOR PARTICULAR ASSESSMENTS, FOR INSTANCE ORAL PRESENTATIONS; THE FORMS FOR THESE SHOW WHAT IS CONSIDERED IMPORTANT. DESCRIPTION PERCENTAGE CAS FIRST: OUTSTANDING WORK, SHOWING THOROUGH UNDERSTANDING; 91-100 20 DISCRIMINATION IN THE USE OF INFORMATION AND STRONG ANALYTICAL ABILITY; EVIDENCE OF EXTENSIVE USE OF ORIGINAL LITERATURE (ESPECIALLY FOR CAS 19/20). CAS 18 FOR WORK SHOWING 81-90 19 EXCELLENT SYNTHESIS OF CONCEPTS, IN ITSELF EVIDENCE OF CRITICAL READING 70-80 18 Answer/essay well-structured with good style and appropriate diagrams integrated with the text. Good integration of material from different elements of the course. UPPER SECOND: WORK SHOWING GOOD UNDERSTANDING OF THE CRITICAL CONCEPTS; 67-69 17 WORK DRAWN LARGELY FROM LECTURE MATERIAL AND FROM A LIMITED SELECTION OF THE LITERATURE; GOOD USE OF EXAMPLES 64-66 16 Marks at the upper end of the scale for integration of material from different elements 60-63 15 of the course. Marks deducted for minor errors. LOWER SECOND: REASONABLE ATTEMPT AT ADDRESSING THE QUESTION BUT SHOWING 57-59 14 LIMITED UNDERSTANDING AND/OR KNOWLEDGE 54-56 13 Few illustrative examples; important facts omitted or lacking breadth. 50-53 12 THIRD: A POOR ANSWER THAT SHOWS SOME RELEVANT KNOWLEDGE BUT 47-49 11 LACKS FOCUS ON THE CENTRAL QUESTIONS 44-46 10 Other major shortcomings, such as inaccuracy, random rather than selected content, material largely irrelevant to the question, poor presentation. 40-43 9 FAIL: 37-39 8 SERIOUSLY LACKING IN CONTENT AND ACCURACY 34-36 7 30-33 6 Marks are given for any relevant material using the full range shown: 25-29 5 CAS 6-8 for some material relevant to the set question 20-24 4 CAS 1-5 for minimal content 15-19 3 CAS 0 for no answer 10-14 2 5-9 1 0-4 0 The CAS scale is not linear. CAS scores are indicators of performance and cannot be averaged or mathematically-manipulated in any way. 33
  34. 34. PRESCRIBED MODULES FOR HONOURS DEGREES 2006-2007 ALL HONOURS DEGREES ATTEND THE FOLLOWING ADVANCED MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY CORE MODULES - 1. Genome organisation and analysis 3. Control of gene expression 2. Evolution of protein structure and function 4. Form and development DEGREE COURSE CODE OPTION MODULES Research Tutorials Biochemistry BC4012 / Receptors and Cell Signalling & MB4050 / BC4512 Biochemisty of Human Diseases Res. Tutorial; Biochem. 1 and 2 Biochemistry BC4013 / Receptors and Cell Signalling & (Immunology) MB4050 / BC4513 Molecular Immunology Res. Tutorial; Biochem. 1 and Immunol. 2 Biotechnology (Appl. Mol. BT4005 / 2 modules from the following list of general subject Biol.) MB4050 / BT4505 categories: biochemistry, genetics, microbiology and immunology Research Tutorials corresponding to Options in semester 1; e.g. if options choice is Biochem 1 + Genetics 2, then Res. Tutorials will be Biochem 1 + Genet. 2 Genetics GN4007 / MB4050 Medical Genetics & / GN4507 Population Genetics Res. Tutorial; Genetics. 1 and 2 Genetics (Immunology) GN4008 / MB4050 Medical Genetics & / GN4508 Molecular Immunology Res. Tutorial; Genetics. 1 and Immunol. 2 Immunology IM4002 / Infection, Immunity and Inflammation & MB4050 / IM4502 Molecular Immunology Res. Tutorial; Immunology 1 and 2 Microbiology MC4012 / MB4050 Population and Environment & / MC4512 Antibiotic Synthesis and Resistance Res. Tutorial; Microbiology 1 and 2 Molecular Microbiology MC4013 / MB4050 Receptors and Cell Signalling & / MC4513 Antibiotic Synthesis and Resistance Res. Tutorial; Biochem. 1 and Microbiol. 2 Molecular Biology MB4004 / MB4050 Medical Genetics & / MB4504 Biochemisty of Human Diseases Res. Tutorial; Genetics. 1 and Biochem 2 Biomedical Sciences BM4008 / MB4050 Receptors and Cell Signalling & (Molecular Biology) / BM4508 Biochemisty of Human Diseases (for students having taken Res. Tutorial; Biochem. 1 and 2 BC3804) Biomedical Sciences BM4008 / MB4050 Receptors and Cell Signalling & (Molecular Biology) / BM4508 Molecular Immunology (for students having taken Res. Tutorial; Biochem. 1 and Immunol 2 IM3802) 34
  35. 35. CORE COURSE SESSION 2006-2007 Genome Organisation and Analysis - Dr Jonathan Pettitt Week Date Time Title Staff Venue 12 M 25.9 9-10 The Honours Year Prof Docherty, Dr Mueller, & Dr Schofield FLT Tu 26.9 9-10 Yeast Genome 1 Prof Brown FLT 12-1 Yeast Genome 2 Prof Brown FLT W 27.9 9-10 Yeast Genome 3 Prof Brown FLT 10-11 Animal Genomes 1 Dr Pettitt FLT Th 28.9 9-10 Animal Genomes 2 Dr Pettitt FLT 13 Tu 3.10 9-10 Animal Genomes 3 Dr Pettitt FLT 4-5 Animal Genomes 4 Dr Pettitt FLT W 4.10 3-4 Comparative genomics in mammals 1 Prof Shaw FLT 4-5 Comparative genomics in mammals 2 Prof Shaw 1:032/033 Evolution of Protein Structure and Function - Professor Nuala Booth Week Date Time Title Staff Venue Th 5.10 9-10 Protein Evolution Dr Pettitt FLT 4-5 Protein Evolution: constraints Dr Pettitt FLT Fr 6.10 12-1 Protein Evolution: modular proteins Dr Pettitt FLT 14 M 9.10 9-10 Protein folding: pathways Dr McEwan FLT Tu 10.10 9-10 Protein folding: flexibility and conformation Dr McEwan FLT W 11.10 3-5 Tutorial - Protein structure Dr Stansfield Comp Rm 3 Th 12.10 9-10 Protein folding: aberrant folding Dr McEwan FLT 15 M 16.10 9-10 Proteolysis Prof NA Booth FLT Tu 17.10 9-10 Proteolysis: protease families Prof NA Booth FLT 10-12 Tutorial – Folds and function Prof IR Booth Comp Rm 3 W 18.10 9-10 Proteolysis: protease inhibitor families Prof NA Booth FLT F 20.10 3-5 Tutorial – paper presented and discussed Prof IR Booth, Prof NA Booth, Dr McEwan, Dr Pettitt & 1.032/033, 1.034, Dr Stansfield 1.039, 1.040 35
  36. 36. Control of Gene Expression - Dr Berndt Mueller Week Date Time Title Staff Venue Th 19.10 12-1 Transcription and Chromatin structure (1) Dr McEwan FLT 16 M 23.10 9-10 Transcription and Chromatin structure (2) Dr McEwan FLT 4-5 Transcription and Chromatin structure (3) Dr McEwan FLT Tu 24.10 9-10 Transcription and Chromatin structure (4) Dr McEwan FLT 1-2 Transcription and Chromatin structure (5) Dr McEwan FLT 17 M 30.10 9-10 Myogenesis and sex differentiation (1) Dr Shennan FLT 4-5 Myogenesis and sex differentiation (2) Dr Shennan FLT Tu 31.10 9-10 Myogenesis and sex differentiation (3) Dr Shennan FLT 1-2 Myogenesis and sex differentiation (4) Dr Shennan FLT Th 02.11 1-2 Post-transcriptional control of gene expression (1)Dr Mueller FLT 2-3 Tutorial 1 Dr Mueller 1:040 Fr 03.11 11-12 Tutorial 1 Dr McEwan 1:032/033 1-2 Tutorial 1 Dr Shennan 1:039 18 Tu 07.11 1-2 Tutorial 2 Dr Mueller 1:032/033 1-2 Tutorial 2 Dr McEwan 1:040 3-4 Post-transcriptional control of gene expression (2)Dr Mueller FLT 4-5 Tutorial 2 Dr Shennan 1:040 W 08.11 2-3 Post-transcriptional control of gene expression (3)Dr Mueller FLT F 10.11 12-1 Post-transcriptional control of gene expression (4)Dr Mueller FLT Development and Form - Professor Neil Gow Week Date Time Title Staff Venue 19 M 13.11 11-12 Tutorial Dr Pettitt FLT Tu 14.11 10-11 Yeast cell and cell polarity (1) Prof Gow 1:032/033 1-2 Yeast cell and cell polarity (2) Prof Gow 1:032/033 3-4 Yeast cell and cell polarity (3) Prof Gow FLT W 15.11 11-12 Embryonic polarity (1) Dr Pettitt FLT Th 16.11 1-2 Tissue polarity and animal morphogenesis (1) Dr Pettitt FLT F 17.11 9-12 Tutorial Prof Gow, Dr Pettitt & Project Room, Dr Hoppler Medical School Library 20 M 20.11 9-10 Tissue polarity and animal morphogenesis (2) Dr Pettitt FLT Tu 21.11 12-1 Tissue polarity and animal morphogenesis (3) Dr Pettitt FLT Th 23.11 9-10 Axis establishmentin embryogenesis (1) Dr S Hoppler FLT 12-1 Axis establishmentin embryogenesis (2) Dr S Hoppler FLT F 24.11 2-4 Tutorial Prof Gow, Dr Pettitt & Dr Hoppler FLT 36
  37. 37. BIOCHEMISTRY OPTION 1 - RECEPTORS AND CELL SIGNALLING SESSION 2006-2007 Biochemistry Biochemistry (Immunology) Biomedical Sciences (Molecular Biology) Molecular Microbiology Week Date Time Class Staff Venue 13 Tu 03.10 1-2 Receptor Structure and Cell signalling (1) Prof Docherty 1:039 W 04.10 1-2 The Wnt signalling pathway (1) Dr Hoppler 1:040 Th 05.10 11-12 The Wnt signalling pathway (2) Dr Hoppler 1:040 F 06.10 9-10 The Wnt signalling pathway (3) Dr Hoppler 1:040 14 W 11.10 11-12 Receptor Structure and Cell signalling (2) Prof Docherty 1:040 1-2 Receptor Structure and Cell signalling (3) Prof Docherty 1:040 Th 12.10 10-11 Receptor Structure and Cell signalling (4) Prof Docherty 1:040 F 13.10 9-10 Receptor Structure and Cell signalling (5) Prof Docherty 1:040 15 Tu 17.10 1-2 Nuclear receptor superfamily (1) Dr McEwan 1:040 W 18.10 11-12 Nuclear receptor superfamily (2) Dr McEwan 1:040 1-2 Nuclear receptor superfamily (3) Dr McEwan 1:040 Th 19.10 11-12 Nuclear receptor superfamily (4) Dr McEwan 1:040 F 20.10 9-10 Tutorial Dr McEwan 1:040 Module Organiser - Dr Iain McEwan (55807; 55887; e-mail iain.mcewan@abdn.ac.uk) 37
  38. 38. BIOCHEMISTRY OPTION 2 – BIOCHEMISTRY OF HUMAN DISEASES SESSION 2006-2007 Biochemistry Biomedical Sciences (Molecular Biology) Molecular Biology Week Date Time Class Staff Venue 17 M 30.10 12-1 Towards an understanding of human prions (1) Dr Stansfield 1:032/033 W 01.11 12-1 Towards an understanding of human prions (2) Dr Stansfield 1:034 1-2 Towards an understanding of human prions (3) Dr Stansfield 1:034 Th 02.11 12-1 The molecular biology of HIV and AIDS (1) Dr Long 1:039 3-4 Towards an understanding of human prions (4) Dr Stansfield 1:040 18 M 06.11 12-1 The molecular biology of HIV and AIDS (2) Dr Long 1:032/033 W 08.11 12-1 The molecular biology of HIV and AIDS (3) Dr Long 1:034 1-2 The molecular biology of HIV and AIDS (4) Dr Long 1:034 Th 09.11 12-1 Virus-cell interactions during virus-induced transformation (1) Dr Cash 1:039 F 10.11 2-3 Virus-cell interactions during virus-induced transformation (2) Dr Cash 1:032/033 19 M 13.11 10-11 Virus-cell interactions during virus-induced Dr Cash 1:032/033 transformation (3) 3-4 Virus-cell interactions during virus-induced Dr Cash 1:034 transformation (4) 20 Tu 21.11 2-5 Tutorial Dr Cash, Dr Long & Dr Stansfield 1:032/033 Module Organiser – Dr Bill Long (e-mail: w.f.long@abdn.ac.uk ~ tel: (27) 4175) 38
  39. 39. GENETICS OPTION 1 – MEDICAL GENETICS SESSION 2006-2007 Molecular Biology Genetics Genetics (Immunology) Week Date Time Class Staff Venue 13 M 02.10 10-12 Controversies in medical genetics Dr Schofield 1:032/033 Tu 03.10 10-11 Cytogenetics (1) Mr Stevenson 1:032/033 W 04.10 9-11 Tutorial Group 1: Stem cell research Dr Schofield 1:034 Th 05.10 10-12 Tutorial Group 2: In vitro fertilisation and imprinting Dr Kelly 1:039 2-3 Cytogenetics (2) Mr Stevenson FLT F 06.10 9-11 Tutorial Group 3: Genetic testing Dr Schofield 1:032/033 3-4 Cytogenetics (3) Mr Stevenson 1:032/033 14 M 09.10 2-3 Cytogenetics (4) Mr Stevenson 1:032/033 3-4 Medical Genetics (1) Dr Schofield 1:032/033 Tu 10.10 10-11 Medical Genetics (2) Dr Schofield FLT 11-12 Medical Genetics (3) Dr Schofield FLT Th 12.10 10-11 Medical Genetics (4) Dr Schofield 1:032/033 F 13.10 9-10 DNA Diagnostics Dr Kelly 1:032/033 10-11 Medical Genetics (5) Dr Schofield 1:032/033 15 F 20.10 10-1 Group presentations: Controversies in medical genetics Dr Schofield & 1:032/033 Dr Kelly Mr David Stevenson (50931; email: david.stevenson2@nhs.net) Dr Kevin Kelly (53888; email: gen182@abdn.ac.uk) Module Organiser – Dr Andy Schofield (53006; email: a.schofield@abdn.ac.uk) 39
  40. 40. GENETICS OPTION 2 - POPULATION GENETICS SESSION 2006-2007 Genetics Week Date Time Class Staff Venue 17 M 30.10 12-1 Population Genetics (1) Mr Cumming 1:039 2-3 Population Genetics (2) Mr Cumming 1:040 W 01.11 11-12 Population Genetics (3) Mr Cumming 1:039 Th 02.11 11-12 Genetic Epidemiology (1) Mr Cumming 1:032/033 F 03.11 9-10 Population Genetics (4) Mr Cumming 1:039 3-4 Genetic Epidemiology [Tutorial 1] Mr Cumming 1:032/033 18 W 08.11 10-11 Immunogenetics (1) Mr Cumming FLT 11-12 Immunogenetics (2) Mr Cumming FLT 3-4 Ecogenetics (1) Dr Dallas 1:040 Th 09.11 11-12 Ecogenetics (2) Dr Dallas 1M:003 19 M 13.11 12-1 Genetic Epidemiology (2) Mr Cumming 1:032/033 2-3 Ecogenetics (3) Dr Dallas 1:040 W 15.11 1-2 Ecogenetics (Tutorial) Dr Dallas 1:040 Th 16.11 10-11 Population Genetics [Tutorial] Mr Cumming 1:032/033 Fr 17.11 2-5 Genetic Epidemiology [Tutorial 2] Mr Cumming 1:040 Module Organisers - Mr Al Cumming (555722); e-mail a.cumming@abdn.ac.uk 40
  41. 41. IMMUNOLOGY OPTION 1 – INFECTION, IMMUNITY AND INFLAMMATION SESSION 2006-2007 Immunology Week Date Time Class Staff Venue 13 M 02.10 4-5 Leucocyte trafficking 1: in health Dr Liversidge 1:040 Tu 03.10 12-1 Leucocyte trafficking 2: blood-brain barrier Dr Liversidge 1:040 Dysfunction and retinal autoimmunity W 04.10 10-11 Leucocyte diapedesis and migration Dr Liversidge 1:039 Th 05.10 2-3 Regulation of leucocyte function in tissues Dr Liversidge 1:039 F 06.10 9-10 Myeloid cells in innate and adaptive immune Dr Liversidge 1:039 responses 14 M 09.10 4-5 Tutorial: In vivo and ex-vivo imaging technologies Dr Xu 1:040 Tu 10.10 12-1 Principals and practice of flow cytometry and Dr Blaylock 1:040 Application in immunological research W 11.10 10-11 Tutorial: Practical aspects of FACS analysis Dr Blaylock 1:039 And quality control for cytometry Th 12.10 2-3 Allergy Dr Walsh 1:039 F 13.10 9-10 Asthma 1 Dr Walsh 1:039 15 M 16.10 4-5 Asthma 2 Dr Walsh 1:040 Tu 17.10 12-1 Resolution of asthmatic and allergic Dr Walsh 1:040 Inflammation - Apoptosis W 18.10 10-11 Immuno-epidemiology (1) Dr Sternberg 1:039 Th 19.10 2-3 Immuno-epidemiology (2) Dr Sternberg 1:039 F 20.10 9-10 Immuno-epidemiology (3) Dr Sternberg 1:039 Module Organiser: Dr Janet Liversidge: tel 59548; e-mail: j.liversidge@abdn.ac.uk) 41
  42. 42. IMMUNOLOGY OPTION 2 - MOLECULAR IMMUNOLOGY SESSION 2006-2007 Biochemistry (Immunology) Genetics (Immunology) Immunology Biomedical Sciences (Molecular Biology) Week Date Time Class Staff Venue 17 M 30.10 10-11 Immuneregulation: self-tolerance Dr Ward 1:034 Tu 31.10 2-3 Immuneregulation: MHC molecules and disease Dr Ward 1:034 Th 02.11 9-10 Immuneregulation: Regulatory T cells Dr Ward 1:034 F 03.11 10-11 Molecular mechanisms of immune evasion Dr Vickers 1:034 2-3 T-cell activation – how much provocation does a T-cell need? Dr Barker 1:034 18 M 06.11 10-11 Immuneregulation: T-cell polarisation Dr Ward 1:034 Tu 07.11 2-3 T-cell regulation – cytokine cascades Dr Wilson 1:034 W 08.11 10-11 Immuneregulation: Fc receptors and disease Dr Ward 1:034 11-12 Immuneregulation: AID Dr Ward 1:034 F 10.11 2-3 Immunotechnology (1) Dr I Broadbent 1:034 19 M 13.11 10-11 Immunotechnology (2) Dr I Broadbent 1:034 Tu 14.11 9-10 Immunotechnology (3) Dr I Broadbent 1:034 2-3 Immunotechnology (4) Dr I Broadbent 1:034 Th 16.11 9-10 Immunotechnology (5) Dr I Broadbent 1:034 F 17.11 2-3 Tutorial Dr I Broadbent 1:034 Module Organiser: Dr Frank Ward (55948; e-mail f.j.ward@abdn.ac.uk) 42
  43. 43. MICROBIOLOGY OPTION 1 - POPULATION AND ENVIRONMENT SESSION 2006-2007 Microbiology Week Date Time Class Staff Venue To be confirmed Module Organiser: Dr Ian Stansfield (55806; 55887; e-mail i.stansfield@abdn.ac.uk) 43
  44. 44. MICROBIOLOGY OPTION 2 - ANTIBIOTIC SYNTHESIS AND RESISTANCE SESSION 2006-2007 Microbiology Molecular Microbiology Week Date Time Class Staff Venue 16 W 25.10 9-10 Antibiotic resistance in bacteria (1) Prof I R Booth 1:034 Th 26.10 2-3 Antibiotic resistance in bacteria (2) Prof I R Booth 1:034 F 27.10 12-1 Antibiotic resistance in bacteria (3) Prof I R Booth 1:032/033 17 M 30.10 10-11 Antibiotic synthesis pathways (1) Prof M Smith 1:040 3-4 Antibiotic synthesis pathways (2) Prof M Smith 1M:003 Tu 31.10 10-11 Antibiotic synthesis pathways (3) Prof M Smith 1:040 18 M 6.11 12-1 Antibiotic resistance in fungi (1) Prof Frank Odds 1:029 T 7.11 9-10 Antibiotic resistance in fungi (2) Prof Frank Odds 1:034 W 08.11 10-11 Antibiotic resistance in fungi (3) Prof Frank Odds 1:040 Th 09.11 2-3 Antiviral resistance in viruses (1) Dr P Cash 1:040 4-5 Antiviral resistance in viruses (2) Dr P Cash 1:039 F 10.11 11-12 Antiviral resistance in viruses (3) Dr P Cash 1:039 1-2 tbc Dr F McKenzie / IRB 1:040 3-5 Tutorial various staff (tbc) 1:040 Module Organiser: Professor Ian Booth (55852; 55851; e-mail i.r.booth@abdn.ac.uk) 44
  45. 45. CORE MODULE - GENOME ORGANISATION AND ANALYSIS SESSION 2006-2007 The genome is the primary source of information for building and maintaining an organism. We now have complete access to this 'raw' information, in the form of DNA sequence, for several organisms, and within ten years several other genomes, including that of humans, are expected to be similarly available. There is a problem, though. To make full use of this data we have to determine the rules used to convert it into biological function. This is a challenge far greater than that required to produce the genome sequences in the first place. The aim of this module is to describe the current progress in these studies with reference to the data emerging from the various genome projects. ANALYSIS OF GENOMES FROM 'HIGHER ORGANISMS' Comparative genomics in mammals I Duncan Shaw Comparative genomics in mammals II Duncan Shaw THE GENOME PROJECT PARADIGM Animal genomes I: The discovery of microRNAs Jonathan Pettitt Animal genomes II: Analysis of microRNA function Jonathan Pettitt Animal genomes III: Ome sweet ome? Jonathan Pettitt Animal genomes IV: Evolution of animal genomes Jonathan Pettitt FUNCTIONAL GENOMICS Yeast genome I: discovery of orphans Al Brown Yeast genome II: functional genomics Al Brown Yeast genome III: towards an understanding of the system Al Brown Module Organiser: Dr Jonathan Pettitt (55737;55922); e-mail j.pettitt@abdn.ac.uk) 45

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