General University Requirements

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  • 1. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM HANDBOOK GENETICS AND PLANT BIOLOGY Department of Plant and Microbial Biology College of Natural Resources
  • 2. Table of Contents Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................................................0 Contact Information....................................................................................................................................................1 Undergraduate Program in Genetics and Plant Biology........................................................................................2 The Department of Plant and Microbial Biology ...................................................................................................2 Completing the Degree...............................................................................................................................................2 Genetics and Plant Biology Major Requirements .............................................................................................................. 2 Areas of Emphasis.................................................................................................................................................................. 3 General University Requirements ........................................................................................................................................ 4 Berkeley Campus Requirement............................................................................................................................................. 5 College of Natural Resources Requirements ...................................................................................................................... 5 Double Majors and Simultaneous Degrees......................................................................................................................... 6 Course Substitutions .............................................................................................................................................................. 7 Transferring Courses.............................................................................................................................................................. 7 Advanced Placement Courses............................................................................................................................................... 7 Advising.........................................................................................................................................................................7 Student Affairs Office............................................................................................................................................................ 7 Faculty Advisors ..................................................................................................................................................................... 8 The Student Learning Center................................................................................................................................................ 8 The Transfer Student Center ................................................................................................................................................ 8 Undergraduate Research Opportunities...................................................................................................................8 Supervised Independent Study and Research: PMB 99 and 199 ..................................................................................... 9 The PMB Honors Research Program: H196...................................................................................................................... 9 Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program (URAP).................................................................................................... 9 CNR Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) ...................................................................................... 9 Scholarships, Grants, and Awards.............................................................................................................................9 Grants for Research ............................................................................................................................................................... 9 Scholarships........................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Departmental Citation ......................................................................................................................................................... 10 Study Abroad..............................................................................................................................................................10 Getting Involved ........................................................................................................................................................10 MycoPhytes ........................................................................................................................................................................... 11 Science Clubs on Campus: .................................................................................................................................................. 11 Careers .........................................................................................................................................................................11 Medical School and Other Health Professions .....................................................................................................11 Graduate Study in Biological Sciences....................................................................................................................12 Course Descriptions ..................................................................................................................................................12 Contact Information For more information please contact: Dana Jantz Trey Patridge Student Affairs Officer Student Affairs Officer Plant and Microbial Biology Plant and Microbial Biology Koshland 111C – MC# 3102 Koshland 111C – MC# 3102 Berkeley, CA 94720 Berkeley, CA 94720 (510) 642-5167 (510) 642-1986 jantz@nature.berkeley.edu trey@nature.berkeley.edu http://pmb.berkeley.edu/ http://pmb.berkeley.edu/ 1
  • 3. Undergraduate Program in Genetics and Plant Biology From oxygen to food to shelter to energy to shade, plants provide us with virtually everything we need to survive and to thrive. Plant Biology studies the distribution and diversity of plant life from the sub- molecular to the organismal level. There is important work awaiting those who want to unravel the mystery of genes; or bring expertise to medical school; or teach the next generation of Biologists; or devise ways to feed the world! The opportunities abound and are awaiting your discovery. This handbook will help familiarize you with the Genetics and Plant Biology major. Along with the guide it is very important to make contact with your advisors, your teachers, and your fellow students. Take control of your education by seeking out opportunities and communicating with the fellow scholars among you. And of course, always feel free to ask questions. Dana Jantz and Trey Patridge in the Student Affairs Office are there to answer all your questions and resolve any problems that arise. The Department of Plant and Microbial Biology Thirty-six faculty members, assisted by over 400 research associates, postdoctoral researchers, graduate and undergraduate students, and staff make up the Department of Plant and Microbial Biology (PMB). The Department studies the structure, physiology, development, cell biology, genetics, biochemistry, molecular biology, and interactions of plants and microbes. Two undergraduate majors are offered: Microbial Biology; and Genetics and Plant Biology. The Department is a part of the College of Natural Resources (CNR). The Department is housed in two primary locations: Koshland Hall on the Northwest corner of campus and the Plant Gene Expression Center in Albany near Interstate 80. There is also ample greenhouse space, lab space, and access to first-class scientific facilities. Completing the Degree In planning your course of study, it is important to keep in mind four types of requirements: University Requirements, Berkeley campus requirements, College of Natural Resources requirements and Genetics and Plant Biology major requirements. Genetics and Plant Biology Major Requirements Following is the list of course requirements. At the end of this handbook is a checklist that will allow you to keep track of the courses you have taken and requirements you have fulfilled. All requirements must be taken for a letter grade except for PMB 199. Lower Division: Units English, Rhetoric, or Comparative Literature (R1A and R1B) .................................................. 8 Additional Humanities and Social Science Courses (see below for more information) ............................................................................................... 15 Chemistry, General and Organic: Chemistry 1A, 3A, 3AL, 3B, 3BL ............................................... 14 Mathematics: Math 16A - 16B or Math 1A - 1B ...................................................................................6-8 General Biology: Biology 1A, 1AL, 1B .................................................................................................... 9 Physics: Physics 8A ................................................................................................................................... 4 Computer Literacy Statistics: Engineering 77; Stat 2, 20, or 131A; CS 3; or PH 142A ..................... 3 Upper Division: Plant Morphology: PMB C 107/L ....................................................................................................... 4 Plant Developmental Genetics: PMB 160/L .................................................................................... 4 Cell and Developmental Plant Biology: PMB C150/L .................................................................. 4 Physiology and Biochemistry of Plants: PMB C135/L ................................................................. 4 2
  • 4. Upper Division Electives: At least five Upper Division Science Courses totaling at least 15 units to be chosen from the list below: Diversity of Plants & Fungi: PMB C102/L ....................................................................................... 4 Bacterial Pathogenesis: PMB C103 ..................................................................................................... 3 Biology of Fungi: PMB 110/L .............................................................................................................. 4 General Microbiology: PMB C112....................................................................................................... 4 California Mushrooms: PMB 113 ....................................................................................................... 2 Comparative Virology: PMB C114....................................................................................................... 4 Biology of Algae: PMB 120/L .......................................................................................................3 or 4 Chromosome Biology/Cytogenetics: PMB C134 ........................................................................... 3 Genomics: PMB C145.............................................................................................................................. 4 Computational Biology & Genomics: PMB C146 ......................................................................... 4 Microbial Genomics and Genetics: PMB C148 .............................................................................. 4 Plant Biotechnology: PMB 170............................................................................................................. 3 Environmental Plant Biology: PMB 180............................................................................................ 2 Techniques in Light Microscopy: PMB 185..................................................................................... 2 Intro to Protein Informatics: BioEng 144......................................................................................... 4 Biochemistry: MCB 102.......................................................................................................................... 4 Cell Biology: MCB 130 ............................................................................................................................ 4 Genetics: MCB 142 or MCB 140............................................................................................................ 4 California Plant Life: IB 102/L............................................................................................................. 4 Medical Ethnobotany: IB 117/L..................................................................................................2 or 4 Plant Physiological Ecology: IB 151/L......................................................................................3 or 4 Plant Population & Community Ecology: IB 154/L .............................................................3 or 5 Ecological Genetics: IB 162 ................................................................................................................. 4 Systematic of Vascular Plants: IB 168/L........................................................................................... 4 Independent Research: PMB 196, PMB 199, or equivalent ..................................................up to 4 TOTAL Units Required............................................................................................. 120 Humanities and Social Science Requirements: Fulfilling IGETC or L & S breadth requirements will satisfy this requirement, so long as the courses are taken for a letter grade. Courses may be chosen from the following Letters and Sciences Breadth Requirement categories: Arts and Literature, Historical Studies, International Studies, Philosophy and Values, and Social and Behavioral Sciences. For a list of courses that satisfy these requirements consult http://ls-advise.berkeley.edu/requirements/lsreq.html. Areas of Concentration Although not a requirement, it may helpful to think about the curriculum in terms of various emphases. Listed below are 5 areas of concentration and the appropriate elective courses that will give you specific training and instruction in the listed area. Genetics Genetics: MCB 142 or 140 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: MCB 102 Plant Biotechnology: PMB 170 Cell Biology: MCB 130 Genomics: PMB C145 Microbial Genetics and Genomics: PMB C148 Chromosome Biology/Cytogenetics: PMB C134 Computational Biology & Genomics: PMB C146 Ecological Genetics: IB 162 3
  • 5. Plant Microbe Interactions Comparative Virology: PMB C114 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: MCB 102 Biology of Fungi: PMB 110/L Biology of Algae: PMB 120/L Plant Physiological Ecology: IB 151/L Bacterial Pathogenesis: PMB C103 General Microbiology: PMB C112 Microbial Genomics and Genetics: PMB C148 Plant Biotechnology Plant Biotechnology: PMB 170 Genetics: MCB 142 or 140 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: MCB 102 Biology of Fungi: PMB 110/L Biology of Algae: PMB 120/L Environmental Plant Biology: PMB 180 Medical Ethnobotany: IB 117/Lab Organismal Biology and Ecology Biology of Fungi: PMB 110/L Biology of Algae: PMB 120/L Environmental Plant Biology: PMB 180 Plant Physiological Ecology: IB 151/L Cell Biology: MCB 130 California Plant Life: IB 102/L Plant Population and Community Ecology: IB 154/L Systematics of Vascular Plants: IB 168/L Ecological Genetics: IB 162 Bioinformatics Genetics: MCB 142 or 140 Genomics: PMB C145 Microbial Genomics and Genetics: PMB C148 Computational Biology and Genetics: PMB C146 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: MCB 102 Introduction to Protein Informatics: BioEng 144 General University Requirements 1. Subject A. This requirement in English composition must be fulfilled by every new undergraduate student during the first year in the University, and may be satisfied in one of several ways described in detail in the General Catalog. 2. American History and Institutions. These requirements are normally satisfied with high school courses. For students still needing to satisfy these requirements after entering UC Berkeley, a variety of options is available. Please read the American History and Institutions section of the current Berkeley General Catalog for further information. If you have questions that are not answered in the catalog, contact the American History and Institutions Office, 120 Wheeler Hall, 642-5006, or the Office of Undergraduate Admission and Relations with Schools, 110 Sproul Hall, 642-3175. Students may also visit the home page at http://teaching.berkeley.edu/ahi/. 4
  • 6. 3. Senior Residence. After 90 units toward the bachelor’s degree have been completed, at least 24 of the remaining units must be completed in the college or school at Berkeley in which the degree is to be obtained. These 24 units must be completed in the semester in which 90 units are exceeded plus at least one additional semester. For the purpose of this regulation, Summer Session does not count toward senior residency. Special provisions are made for students in the campus abroad program. 4. Scholarship. You must maintain at least a 2.0 grade-point average at the University. 5. Graduation. If you are a senior, the Tele-BEARS registration system will ask you if you expect to graduate at the end of the semester for which you are registering. You may also contact the Office of Instruction and Student Affairs in 260 Mulford or the Graduation Department in 128 Sproul Hall no later than the fifth week of any current semester. You must request to be put on the degree list in order to graduate. Students must meet the college and University requirements to be eligible for graduation. If you have any questions regarding these deadlines or procedures, please call 642-0542. 6. Other Pertinent Information. Only 16 units of Independent Study may count toward the units for graduation. No more than one-third of the total units attempted at Berkeley may be taken on a passed/not passed basis. A maximum of 4 units of Independent Study may be taken per semester. Berkeley Campus Requirement The American Cultures breadth requirement is a prerequisite for the baccalaureate degree awarded to students who begin their studies at Berkeley in lower division standing (with 0-55 transferable semester units) in fall 1991 or thereafter, and all students who entered in fall 1993 or thereafter. You must satisfy the requirement by passing, with a grade not lower than C- or P, an American Cultures course. You may take an American Cultures course at any time during your undergraduate career at Berkeley. International students as well as domestic students must satisfy the requirement. A Berkeley faculty committee determines which courses satisfy the requirement. Faculty from many departments teach American Cultures courses, but all courses have a common framework. The courses focus on themes or issues in United States history, society, or culture; address theoretical or analytical issues relevant to understanding race, culture, and ethnicity in our society; take substantial account of groups drawn from at least three of the following: African Americans, indigenous peoples of the United States, Asian Americans, Chicano/Latino Americans, and European Americans; and are integrative and comparative in that students study each group in the larger context of American society, history, or culture. The courses also provide students with the intellectual tools to better understand their own identity and the cultural identity of others in their own terms. American Cultures courses may also meet other requirements, such as a college or school's breadth requirement or a department's major requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for the specific American Cultures courses offered each semester or link to the following website: http://amercult.berkeley.edu/. See your academic adviser if you have questions about your responsibility to satisfy the American Cultures breadth requirement. College of Natural Resources Requirements The college offers an academic curriculum in natural resources, with several majors and fields of emphasis, and a professional curriculum that prepares students to meet the requirements of specific professional societies and associations. Both of these curricula lead to the degree of Bachelor of Science in the elected major. You must fulfill the following four requirements: 5
  • 7. 1. Unit Requirement. At least 120 semester units of courses must be completed. Thirty-six semester units must be in upper division courses, 15 of which must be taken in the College of Natural Resources. No more than 4 units of the 120-unit total may be in lower division physical education courses. 2. Major Requirement. You must complete the requirements of your major. All major requirements must be taken for a letter grade. 3. Scholarship Requirement. At least a C average (2.0) is required in all courses undertaken in the University, and a C- or better in each of the courses required for the major program. All major requirements must be taken for a letter grade. 4. Reading and Composition Requirement. In addition to Subject A, you must fulfill the Reading and Composition requirement. This requirement consists of two halves, and must be satisfied by taking two semesters of reading and composition courses or some authorized equivalent. Scores of 4 or 5 on the English AP exam exempt students from the first half of the requirement. However, all CNR students are required to complete the second half of the requirement. The Reading and Composition requirement is a college requirement, and students will not be permitted to waive either part of the requirement. Contact the Office of Instruction and Student Affairs, 260 Mulford Hall, for information regarding R&C equivalents at community colleges. Double Majors and Simultaneous Degrees What is a double major? A double major consists of two majors within the same school or college on this campus. A student with a double major earns one B.S. degree with two majors. How are simultaneous degrees different from double majors? While a double major consists of two majors within one school or college, a simultaneous degree program consists of two majors from two different schools or colleges on this campus. For example, you might want to pursue simultaneous degrees in Genetics and Plant Biology (CNR) and in Chemistry (College of Chemistry). A student in this program earns two degrees, one from each school or college. What are the CNR requirements to complete a simultaneous degree or double major? 1. All CNR breadth requirements must be completed. 2. No more than 2 upper division courses may be counted to complete requirements for both majors. 3. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 is required. 4. A major adviser for each major must approve the program. Simultaneous degrees additionally require the approval of the Dean of each college or school. 5. Double major applications should be submitted at least one semester prior to graduation. Simultaneous degree applications must be submitted at least two semesters prior to graduation. 6. Simultaneous degree applicants must pay special attention to all college unit and residence requirements. A proposed planned program for a double major will not be approved if, according to the proposed program, the student will have completed more than 136 semester units prior to the last semester and enrollment in the last semester will extend his or her enrollment beyond nine semesters, or the equivalent, in all institutions attended. A proposed planned program may contain an unlimited number of units beyond the 120 semester units required for graduation on condition that all requirements for the double major will be completed within a maximum of nine semesters (or the equivalent) in all institutions attended. 6
  • 8. After you have met with major advisors in both of your intended major departments and have decided that you definitely want to declare a double major or simultaneous degrees, pick up an application in the Student Affairs Office, 111C Koshland Hall or download one off the college’s website at http://cnr.berkeley.edu. Course Substitutions There are occasions when it is necessary to request an exception to a requirement. For instance, when a student transfers with some upper division courses from another institution, or when it seems academically appropriate for a student to take a different course. Students requesting an exception to a major requirement must seek approval first from the Advising Office in Koshland 111C and then from their faculty advisor with a “Petition for Exception to Curriculum Requirements.” This form is available on the web, as well as in the Student Affairs Office, and must be submitted to the Student Affairs Officer once approval has been obtained from a faculty advisor. Transferring Courses The Genetics and Plant Biology major generally accepts courses from other colleges and universities. Upon completion of transfer courses, to receive PB major credit, students must send official transcripts to UCB Admissions and bring in a copy of their transfer transcript to the CNR Student Affairs Office. All lower division PMB requirements can be transferred from a California Community College. The list of approved courses from a CCC is found on the Internet at http://www.ASSIST.org/ under "Institution: UC Berkeley, Major: Genetics and Plant Biology." Courses on ASSIST are already approved by PMB. Courses from institutions not found on ASSIST require PMB approval. If you have any questions about transferring courses, be sure to see Dana in the Student Affairs Office. Advanced Placement Courses If you have taken AP courses and their corresponding tests, you may be able to count these courses for some major requirements. Remember that substitution is optional and for courses in Chemistry, Physics, and Math it is not recommended that substitution is chosen. Students more often struggle with the subsequent Chemistry, Physics, and Math courses if they don’t take the introductory courses at a University. AP Math AB 3, 4 or 5 = Math 16A AP Math BC 3 or 4 = Math 16A AP Math BC 5 = Math 16A and 16B AP Chemistry 3, 4 or 5 = Chem 1A AP Physics B 3, 4 or 5 = Physics 8A Other AP courses may also count for Humanities and Social Science requirements. Consult with Dana in the Student Affairs Office. Advising Student Affairs Office Dana Jantz and Trey Patridge are your guides through the major. If you have any problems at all, be sure to call, email, or visit either of them in their office in Koshland 111C. They will help you make the most out of your education at UC Berkeley. The office is set up to answer all questions concerning administration and academics, or about other available services. Students may want to: (1) ask questions about major requirements; (2) ask advice about schedule planning; (3) declare the Genetics and Plant Biology major; (4) consult documentation 7
  • 9. about research opportunities, graduate & professional schools, career opportunities, scholarships and internships; (5) get their Advisor Code for Tele-BEARS registration; (6) make changes to their class schedules; (7) get information and course control numbers for independent research; (8) find out about the Plant and Microbial Biology student club; (9) request general assistance, advice or information; and (10) find out about upcoming events and programs. These and other issues can be addressed by the Student Affairs Office. Don’t hesitate to come by for a visit. Student Affairs Officers: Dana Jantz – 111C Koshland Hall, (510) 642-5167, jantz@nature.berkeley.edu Trey Patridge – 111C Koshland Hall, (510) 642-1986, trey@nature.berkeley.edu Faculty Advisors The Faculty Advisor serves as a mentor of scholarship and research. Currently Norman Terry is the Head Undergraduate Advisor although feel free to seek advice from any faculty member you feel comfortable with. Dr. Terry can help you determine an emphasis of study, find research opportunities, plan graduate study, and grow your excitement about the major. It is highly recommended that you visit with Dr. Terry at least once a year to: (1) receive guidance toward achieving academic and career goals; (2) ask questions about the content of PMB courses; (3) request exceptions to Genetics and Plant Biology major requirements and policies (obtain their signature on PMB Petition for Curriculum Exception); (4) ask questions about biological research and about the field of biology in general; (5) ask for recommendations on which graduate schools to attend. Head Advisor: Norman Terry – 351B Koshland Hall, (510) 643-6602, nterry@nature.berkeley.edu The Student Learning Center Well over 50% of students on campus use the Student Learning Center at some point. The numbers are even higher for science majors. The Student Learning Center offers courses, seminars, and workshops on study strategies, writing, and ESL. It also organizes study groups, offers drop-in and individual tutoring for many courses. The center is located at 198 Cesar Chavez Student Center. They can be reached at 510-642-7332. http://slc.berkeley.edu. The Transfer Student Center The Transfer Student Center provides a range of transitional support services for new and continuing transfer students at Cal. The goal of the center is to introduce students to the many resources, services, and opportunities that Cal has to offer. The center is located at 101 Cesar Chavez Student Center. http://transfer.berkeley.edu. Undergraduate Research Opportunities Under the guidance of a faculty sponsor, undergraduates in the Genetics and Plant Biology major have the opportunity to work in a laboratory to gain valuable experience in scientific research. Interested students must take the initiative to make such arrangements. To get started, talk with classmates, peer advisors, the Student Affairs Office, Graduate Student Instructor’s (GSI's), and faculty about your interest in learning more about laboratory research. Students may receive academic credit for their work by enrolling in an independent study course: PMB 99, 199 or PMB H196. A maximum of 4 units can count toward major requirements. Enrollment applications are due in the Student Affairs Office by the third week of each semester. For additional opportunities beyond what is listed below consult http://research.berkeley.edu. 8
  • 10. Supervised Independent Study and Research: PMB 99 and 199 These courses are open to students who have adequate backgrounds and have arranged to work in a Plant Biology laboratory. Students taking 99 must have fewer than 60 units; students taking 199 must have completed 60 units of undergraduate work and must be in good academic standing. Applications are available in the Student Affairs Office and on the website. To receive PMB 199 credit for research students must: 1) find a PMB faculty member to sponsor their research; 2) submit a completed PMB 199 application (an application must be submitted each semester for which the student wishes to receive PMB 199 credit); 3) submit a written report on the research project to their PMB sponsor at the end of each semester for which they receive PMB 199 credit. The PMB Honors Research Program: H196 The PMB Honors program offers outstanding seniors the opportunity for recognition of their research through presentation and a thesis. H196 students usually work in a Plant Biology laboratory. However, a student may work in any appropriate lab, on or off campus, as long as a PMB faculty member or head advisor sponsors the H196 course. A student is regarded as participating in the PMB departmental honors program once he/she has been accepted into a laboratory and has enrolled in PMB H196 Honors Research. Application packets for the honors program are available on the web or in the Student Affairs Office. Students who fulfill all PMB Honors criteria (including overall GPA requirements) receive a notation on their transcript and diploma which reads "Department Honors in Genetics and Plant Biology." To graduate with honors in the major, students must 1) complete at least 8 units of PMB H196 over two consecutive semesters; 2) present their research in the CNR Honors Symposium; 3) write an honors thesis approved by their Plant Biology sponsor; 4) and maintain a GPA of 3.6 or higher. For more information consult the College of Natural Resources Undergraduate Handbook. Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program (URAP) Each semester, several PMB faculty mentor students in the Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program. Students with at least a 2.0 GPA are eligible and, if selected, may do independent research in a Plant Biology laboratory. For information visit the URAP Office in 301 Campbell Hall or at their website: http://research.berkeley.edu/urap/. CNR Sponsored Projects for Undergraduate Research (SPUR) CNR provides funding for CNR undergraduates to do independent research with Plant and Microbial Biology faculty members. If you have worked with, or are interested in working with a CNR faculty member, ask them whether they are interested in applying for SPUR funds: http://cnr.berkeley.edu/site/spur.php Scholarships, Grants, and Awards Grants for Research There are several programs that provide financial support for undergraduate research. Plant Biology students are encouraged to visit the Office of Undergraduate Research in 301 Campbell, the Undergraduate Scholarship Office at 210 Sproul, and The Scholarship Connection at 345 Campbell for information and applications for programs such as the following. Biology Fellows Program Summer research grants up to $3500 for undergraduates in the biological sciences. 9
  • 11. The President's Undergraduate Fellowship Program Up to $2000 awarded to conduct academic research projects. A minimum 3.0 GPA is required. Haas Scholars Program The Haas Scholars Program provides up to $5,000 for summer research prior to and during senior year. Must have major in a biological science and 3.5 GPA to apply. Miller Scholars Program The Miller Scholars Program provides up to a $7,000 stipend for summer and academic year research. Applicants must be Bay Area community college transfer students, preferably from a TRIO program. Nathan and Violet David Scholars Program The David Scholars Program provides up to a $7,200 stipend for summer and academic year research and up to $4,000 for supplies. Applicants must be US permanent residents with financial need, who are planning to pursue a PhD in a related field. Scholarships Scholarships are available and are certainly worth investigating. Check out the following websites for more information: http://uga.berkeley.edu/fao/scholarships.html and http://scholarships.berkeley.edu. Departmental Citation The Departmental Citation represents the highest achievement each year by a graduating senior in the Genetics and Plant Biology major, not only in terms of overall grade point average, but in major course work, quality of research, and such other factors that indicate promise of great success in the student's career. Students are generally nominated for the Departmental Citation by their research sponsor or another Plant Biology faculty member. Students are encouraged to bring their interest in a nomination to the attention of a Plant Biology faculty member. The Citation is awarded by a vote of the Undergraduate Affairs Committee. The winner receives $500 and a certificate at the graduation commencement. Study Abroad Many students choose to spend one or two semesters abroad during their undergraduate studies at Cal. The Genetics and Plant Biology Major may accept up to two appropriate courses from abroad toward the PB upper division major requirements and an unlimited number toward lower division courses. With careful early planning, it is possible to go abroad and still graduate in eight or nine semesters. Information on programs abroad is available in the Education Abroad Office, 160 Stephens Hall. http://www.ias.berkeley.edu/bpsa/ Getting Involved Getting actively involved at UC Berkeley is measurably crucial to your academic success. Whether it be our PMB undergraduate student group, MycoPhytes, another student organization, student government, performing arts, sports, or whatever, making strong connections to people and groups at the University will help you succeed and feel comfortable here. You can search for student organizations at the following website http://uga.berkeley.edu/sas/student/groupsearch.asp. 10
  • 12. MycoPhytes The MycoPhytes is the PMB student group consisting of GPB majors as well as Microbial Biology majors. The group plans events that are very helpful to students in the major. Recent events include a discussion of graduate school with current graduate students, a discussion with seniors about courses and general advice, and a dinner with the Faculty Advisors. Contact the Student Affairs Office or go to an event to get involved. Science Clubs on Campus: American Indian Science and Engineering Society; American Medical Student Association; Society for Conservation Biology; Break the Cycle; Berkeley Scientific; Black Students in Health Association; Cal Pre-Vet Society; Chicano/Latinos in Health Education; Engineers in Medicine and Biology; Environmental Sciences Students Association; Forensic Detection and Criminology Club; Foresight Pre- Optometry Club; Health and Medical Apprentice Program; ISSUES Berkeley Medical Journal; The Medical Cluster; Pharmacists' Informational, Learning and Leadership Society; Pilipino Association for Health Careers; Pilipino Association of Scientists, Architects, and Engineers; Pre-Dental Society; Pre- Med Honor Society; Queers in Engineering, Science, and Technology; Science, Technology and Society Forum; SCIBUGS; Students for Integrative Medicine; Undergraduate Dietetics Student Association; Wonderworks. Careers Students with undergraduate degrees in Genetics and Plant Biology have many different career options. A Cal-Berkeley degree goes a long way with any employer, but here are a few possible places of employment: State environmental agencies • biotechnology companies • pharmaceutical companies • research institutes • public health agencies • public policy institutions • secondary schools • the Environmental Protection Agency • the Department of Health and Human Services • science journals • newspapers • Law School • etc. For more information about career opportunities in the life sciences make an appointment with Sharron O’Connor in the Career Center at 2111 Bancroft, 642-5207. Also be sure to check out the career center website at http://career.berkeley.edu. Internships can also offer you important work experience. Be in contact with the career center and watch your email to take advantage of real world and often paid internships that can get you that much needed experience. I can’t emphasize enough the importance of making contact with the Career Center. They are very well organized and offer many wonderful services. Don’t wait until you are a senior to visit them. The Career Center can help you with all aspects of your future and help you figure out if you are in the right field and how best to utilize your skills. Visit them. Medical School and Other Health Professions Many students interested in the Genetics and Plant Biology major are preparing for acceptance to professional schools such as medical, dental, optometry, or pharmacy school. In general, the Genetics and Plant Biology major requirements more than fulfill the science admission requirements for these schools. The following Genetics and Plant Biology requirements are considered "pre-med" and usually fulfill admission requirements to the programs mentioned above: Math 1A-1B Chem 1A, 3A-B 11
  • 13. Physics 8A-B Bio 1A-B MCB 100 or 102 Be aware that each pre-health science school has its own specific admission requirements so it is a good idea to scout out some potential schools and take note of their requirements. Additional information can be found at http://career.berkeley.edu/Health/Health.stm or at the Career Center, 2111 Bancroft, 642- 5207. Graduate Study in Biological Sciences You may want to continue your education at the graduate level (i.e. Ph.D., MBA., Masters Programs, etc.). Students who receive a graduate degree can pursue careers as research scientists, teachers, or professors. In addition to excellent academic achievement in appropriate courses and on entrance exams (such as the GRE) graduate study in a biological science generally requires laboratory research experience. Refer to the section "Undergraduate Research Opportunities" for information on obtaining research experience as an undergraduate. Students planning to pursue a graduate degree are encouraged to take PMB graduate level courses (this requires approval of the instructor). Contact your faculty advisor and the Career Center for additional graduate school guidance. http://career.berkeley.edu/Grad/Grad.stm Course Descriptions PMB 102/L – Diversity of Plants and Fungi An integrated treatment of the biology and evolution of the major groups in the plant, algal, and fungal kingdoms. The course includes four hours of laboratory per week and two 1-day field trips. PMB C103 – Bacterial Pathogenesis This course will focus on model microbial systems which illustrate mechanisms of pathogenesis. Most of the emphasis will be on bacterial pathogens of mammals, but there will be some discussion of viral and protozoan pathogens. There will be an emphasis on experimental approaches. The course will also include some aspects of bacterial genetics and physiology, immune response to infection, and the cell biology of host-parasite interactions. PMB 110/L – Biology of Fungi Selected aspects in fungi: their structure, reproduction, physiology, ecology and genetics; their role in plant diseases, human welfare, and industry. In the lab portion several field trips are offered including day trips to a mushroom farm, a winery and a cheese factory, and a weekend mushroom foray. PMB C112 – General Microbiology This course will provide an introduction to bacterial diversity, growth, cellular structures, and metabolism. We will explore the molecular mechanisms used by bacteria to sense their environment and respond with the appropriate changes in behavior, metabolism, and/or gene expression. Interactions of bacteria within homogeneous and mixed populations, and beneficial and harmful interactions of bacteria with different hosts will be investigated. We will also highlight common industrial applications of microbes. PMB 113 – California Mushroom This is a hands-on class in identification of macro fungi. Empahsis will be on laboratory work with fresh and dried fungi. Short lectures at the beginning of labs focus on mushroom systematic, collection techniques, and identification. Three weekend field trips are required in addition to the weekly laboratory. 12
  • 14. PMB C114 – Introduction to Comparative Virology Viruses will be considered as infectious agents of bacteria, plants and animals (vertebrates and invertebrates). Several families of viruses will be compared with respect to biochemical, structural and morphological properties, and strategies of infection and replication. The position of viruses within the biological hierarchy will be examined. PMB 120 - Biology of Algae General biology of freshwater and marine algae, highlighting current research and integrating phylogeny, ecology, physiology, genetics, and molecular biology. Laboratories include study of representative types, identification of specimens collected during several field trips, and experiments on development, physiology, and molecular genetics. PMB C134 – Chromosome Biology/Cytogenetics Survey of behavior, structure, and function of chromosomes with emphasis on behavior in model organisms. Topics include mitosis, meiosis, chromosome aberrations, genome function, dosage compensation, transpoons, repetitive DNA, and modern cytological imaging. PMB 135/L – Physiology and Biochemistry of Plants. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Biology 1A-1B. A study of physiological and biochemical processes in higher plants, including water relations, ion transport, and hormone physiology; photosynthesis (light utilization and carbon assimilation), nitrogen and sulfur metabolism, and plant-specific biosynthetic pathways. The course includes three hours of laboratory with discussion per week. PMB C145 – Genomics In-depth introduction to genomics, including genome sequencing; bioinformatics; sequence annotation and analysis; complex trait mapping; DNA microarrays and their uses; proteomics; structural genomics. Prerequisites: Molecular and Cell Biology 102 or 110. PMB C146 – Topics in Computational Biology and Genomics Instruction and discussion of topics in genomics and computational biology. Working from evolutionary concepts, the course will cover principles and application of molecular sequence comparison, genome sequencing and functional annotation, and phylogenetic analysis. Prerequisites: Bioengineering 142, Computer Science 61A, or equivalent ability to write programs in Java, Perl, C, or C++; Molecular and Cell Biology 100, 102, or equivalent; or consent of an instructor. PMB C148 – Microbial Genetics and Genomics Course emphasizes prokaryotic genetics and comparative genomics. Genetic mechanisms are integrated with methods of genomic analysis to functionally dissect regulatory mechanisms involved in metabolic and development processes in bacteria and archaea. This course includes an introduction to the use of computational tools for a comparative analysis of microbial genes and genomes and methods to evaluate relationships among prokaryotic and eukaryotic species. PMB 150 – Plant Cell Biology An introduction to the structure, dynamics, and function of plant cells: organelle structure and development; intracellular trafficking of small and macromolecules; cellular signaling; cell division and specialization. The course includes three hours of laboratory/discussion per week which is designed to accompany the lecture course and to introduce microscopy, biochemical, and molecular tools for studying cell biology. PMB 160 – Plant Molecular Genetics A consideration of plant genetics and molecular biology. Principles of nuclear and organellar genome structure and function: regulation of gene expression in response to environmental and developmental stimuli; clonal analysis; investigation of the molecular and genetic bases for the exceptional cellular and developmental strategies adopted by plants. The course includes three hours of lecture/discussion per week. 13
  • 15. PMB 170 – Modern Applications of Plant Biotechnology This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and applications of modern plant Biotechnology. Basic concepts of modern agriculture will be reviewed in light of emerging biotechnology applications. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the tools and strategies involved in optimizing plant productivity. Food and environmental safety, legal and socioeconomic issues that have led to consumer concerns and ongoing public debate will also be emphasized with a view towards the science behind the issues and open discussion about ethical concerns. PMB 180 – Environmental Plant Biology This course is intended to provide an integrated and multidisciplinary approach to the study of interactions between plants, microbes and the environment. The course examines the underlying biochemistry, physiology, and molecular biology of plant and microbial adaptation and acclimation to environmental stress. High and low temperature stress, irradiance and oxidative stress, water and salinity stress, as well as flooding stress are among those stresses considered. The use of genetically modified plants and microbes for various applications to the environment is discussed. In addition, the role of phytoremediation and constructed wetlands in the cleanup of environmental pollutants such as selenium, arsenic, mercury, xenobiotics and human parasites is discussed. PMB 185 – Techniques in Light Microscopy The course will be a detailed overview of the practice of light microscopy as applied to scientific investigation. The emphasis of the course will be on the correct and appropriate use of the light microscope for biological scientists; however students of other disciplines are welcome. The course will cover optical microscope theory, microscope components and mechanics, and optical techniques including detailed descriptions, demonstrations, and use of all the modern light microscope contrast methods. Also, the course will cover contemporary digital methods of 2D imaging for fluorescence microscopy, as well as a thorough discussion and practice of the 3D imaging techniques of confocal and deconvolution microscopy. Since digital image processing is an important part of microscope imaging, the course will conclude with a thorough survey of 2D, 3D, and 4D image processing and analysis software. Students will receive hands-on experience in all microscope and digital imaging techniques via direct instruction and use of instrumentation in the College of Natural Resourses Biological Imaging Facility. ESPM 162 – Bioethics and Society Exploration of the ethical dilemmas arising from recent advances in the biological sciences: genetic engineering, sociobiology, health care delivery, behavior modification, patients' rights, social or private control of research. IB 102 – Introduction to California Plant Life The relationship of the main plant groups and the plant communities of California to climate, soils, vegetation, geological and recent history, and conservation. The Lab focuses on the main plant groups and the major plant families in California, and the use of keys to identify introduced and especially native pteridophytes, conifers, and particularly flowering plants of the state. IB 117 – Medical Ethnobotany Biological diversity and ethno-linguistic diversity sustain traditional botanical medicine systems of the world. Major topics covered in this course include cultural origins of medicinal plant knowledge on plant-derived pharmaceuticals and phytomedicine; field research methods in ethnobotany and ethnopharmacology; examples of how traditional botanical medicines provide safe, effective, affordable, and sustainable primary health care to tropical countries; human physiology, human diseases, and mechanisms of action of plant-derived drugs. IB 117L – Medical Ethnobotany Lab The Laboratory will focus on studying medicinal plants from the major ecosystems and geographical regions of the world. Students will learn common names, scientific names, plant families, field 14
  • 16. identification, habitats, and ethnomedical uses of medicinal plants. How the medicinal plant is prepared, administered, and used as a phytomedicine will also be discussed. There will be reference to the phylogenetic relationships between the plant families and genera represented by the medicinal plants. IB 151 – Plant Physiological Ecology Will explore the physiological adaptations by which plants cope with their physical and biological environment, considering both the physiological adjustments made by individual plants and the evolutionary responses seen in different species. We will begin with the physiological adjustments to environmental stresses (water, nutrients, light, and temperature) and then will consider the physiological basis of competitive and mutalistic interactions between plants, animals and microorganisms. IB 151L – Plant Physiology Ecology Laboratory The course will introduce the student to the techniques and experimental approaches of plant physiological ecology, using modern equipment. The course will then use the experimental approaches learned in the lab exercises to address an unresolved question: What are the interrelated suite of physiological traits which enable plants to adapt to California’s diverse environments? IB 154/L – Plant Population and Community Ecology An in-depth consideration of the principles of plant ecology at the population and community levels. Topics include plant population dynamics, life histories, plant/animal interactions, and community structure and development. The lab consists of four hours of laboratory per week and two or three 1-day field trips. IB 162 – Ecological Genetics This course will bridge the gap between ecology, genetics, and evolutionary biology. It will present contemporary approaches to studying evolution in natural populations, including analyzing heritability of ecologically important traits, using molecular techniques to decompose genotypes, documenting and measuring the magnitude of selection in natural systems, and using models to predict evolution in natural populations. Case studies will be used to examine evolutionary effects of ecological interactions among organisms, the importance of population size and structure, and interactions among populations through migration and dispersal. IB 168 – Systematics of Vascular Plants A discussion of the philosophy, principles, techniques, and history of botanical systematics. An outline of the major group of vascular plants and their evolution. The lab portion is devoted to a survey on a world-wide basis of vascular plant families. BIO ENG 144 – Introduction to Protein Informatics This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of molecular biology and to the bioinformatics tools and databases used for the prediction of protein function and structure. It is designed to impart both a theoretical understanding of popular computational methods and practical hands-on experience with protein sequence analysis methods applied to real data. Prior experience in Unix/Linux is helpful but not required. MCB 102 - Biochemistry and Molecular Biology A comprehensive survey of the fundamentals of biological chemistry, including the properties of intermediary metabolites, the structure and function of biological macromolecules, the logic of metabolic pathways (both degradative and biosynthetic) and the molecular basis of genetics and gene expression. MCB 130 – Cell Biology An introductory survey of cell and developmental biology. The assembly of supramolecular structures; membrane structure and function; the cell surface; cytoplasmic membranes; the cytoskeleton and cell 15
  • 17. motility; the eukaryotic genome, chromatin, and gene expression; the cell cycle; organelle biogenesis, differentiation, and morphogenesis. MCB 140 – General Genetics In-depth introduction to genetics, including mechanisms of inheritance; gene transmission and recombination; transposable DNA elements; gene structure, function, and regulation; and developmental genetics. MCB 142 - Survey of General Genetics A survey of genetics with primary emphasis upon mechanisms of heredity and Molecular genetics. Includes some treatment of evolutionary genetics. 16