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[ ] Fornage_Myriam.doc

  1. 1. CURRICULUM VITAE Myriam Fornage, Ph.D. Institute of Molecular Medicine Research Center for Human Genetics 2121 W. Holcombe Blvd. IBT 1007 Houston, Texas 77030 United States Phone: (713) 500-2463 Fax: (713) 500-2424 Email: myriam.fornage@uth.tmc.edu; mfornage@mindspring.com EDUCATION 1986-1989 B.S., University of Nancy, France, Biochemistry (Honors) 1989-1990 M.S., University of Nancy, France, Biochemistry (Honors) 1991-1996 Ph.D., University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Human Genetics POSTDOCTORAL TRAINING 1996-1998 Postdoctoral Fellow, Case Western Reserve University, Department of Genetics 1998-2000 Research Fellow, University of Texas – Houston, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Research Center for Human Genetics ACADEMIC APPOINTMENT 2000 – Present Assistant Professor, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Research Center for Human Genetics 2002 – Present Faculty, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences HONORS AND AWARDS 1994 Schissler Foundation Scholarship, the University of Texas Health Science at Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences 2002 American Heart Association, Bugher Foundation Awards for the Investigation of Stroke (Funds declined) 2004 Young Investigator Award. Society for the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat. 2004 European Council for Cardiovascular Research Scholarship Award. 9th Annual meeting of the ECCR
  2. 2. RESEARCH SUPPORT Source: NIH/ National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Project: “Functional Genomics of Arterial Thrombosis” RO1-NS41466 (Fornage) Funding: $1,490,000 from Sep 1, 2000 to Aug 31, 2005 Role on Project: Principal Investigator Project Description: This project uses gene expression profiling with micro-arrays to identify genes contributing to arterial thrombosis and stroke in two animal models: the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat and the atherosclerosis-susceptible dog. It then tests the hypothesis that genetic variation in the identified expressional candidate genes influences stroke and atherosclerosis risk in a large population-based sample of individuals participating in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Source: NIH/ National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Project: “Gene-Environment Interactions in Stroke Susceptibility” RO1-HL69126 (Fornage) Funding: $1,701,519, from Sep 30, 2001 to Sep 29, 2005 Role on Project: Principal Investigator Project Description: This project seeks to (1) identify genes interacting with dietary factors to influence susceptibility to stroke in the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat; (2) to assess the association of variation in these genes with co-segregation of diet- influenced stroke in F2 crossbred animals; (3) to identify polymorphisms in the human homologues of these genes; (4) to determine whether these polymorphisms are associated with stroke risk in humans and whether their effects are influenced by dietary factors. Source: NIH/ National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Project: “Genetics of Microangiopathic Brain Injury” RO1- NS41558 (Turner) Funding: $564,048, from Aug 22, 2001 to Mar 31, 2006 Role on Project: Collaborating Investigator, Principal Investigator of the sub-contract for genetic studies Project Description: This project uses genome-wide linkage analysis and analysis of association in candidate genes to localize and characterize genes influencing MRI volume of leukoaraiosis and measures of cognitive function in 700 African-American and 700 Caucasian hypertensive siblings. Source: NIH/ National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Project: “The ARIC and Neurocognitive Longitudinal Study” RO1-HL70825 (Mosley) Funding: $99,035, from Oct 1, 2002 to Jun 30, 2005 Role on Project: Collaborating Investigator; Principal Investigator of the sub-contract for genetic analyses Project Description: This project performs association studies of CVD-related candidate genes with cerebrovascular pathologies detected by MRI on participants in the Atherosclerosis Risk In Communities (ARIC), a large population-based epidemiology study. Source: NIH/ National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Project: “CARDIA DNA and Genotyping Laboratory” NO1-HC95095 (Fornage)
  3. 3. Funding: $321,473, from Mar 1, 2000 to Nov 30, 2004 Role on Project: Collaborating Investigator; Principal Investigator of the sub-contract for genetic studies; Chair of the CARDIA Genetics Working Group Project Description: This is a subcontract to identify and genotype selected candidate gene polymorphisms to investigate their role in clinical and sub-clinical measures of coronary artery disease risk in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study, a population-based longitudinal study of 5,000 African-American and Caucasian participants. Of particular interest is the investigation of context-dependent effects of genes (i.e., gene x environment interactions) on cardiovascular disease and its risk factors. Source: NIH/ National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Project: “Androgens and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Young Women” RO1-HL65622 (Siscovick) Funding: $204,666, from Jul 1, 2001 to Jun 30, 2004 Role on Project: Collaborating Investigator; Principal Investigator of the sub-contract for genetic studies Project Description: This project seeks to investigate the relationship between variation in genes involved in androgen synthesis and metabolism and risk of developing atherosclerosis (aortic coronary calcification) in young women participating in the CARDIA study. PUBLICATIONS Peer-Reviewed Publications • Fornage M, Lee CR, Doris PA, Bray MS, Heiss G, Zeldin DC, and Boerwinkle E. Sequence Variation in the Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Gene is Associated with Ischemic Stroke (in preparation) • Bielinski SJ, Lynch AI, Miller MB, Weder A, Cooper R, Oberman A, Risch N, Chen YI, Turner ST, Fornage M, Province M, Arnett DK. Genome-wide Linkage Analysis for Loci Affecting Pulse Pressure: The Family Blood Pressure Program (FBPP) (in preparation) • Fornage M, Jacobs DR, Schreiner PJ, Siscovick DS, and Steffes MW. Haplotype analysis of the PPARγ gene in relation to measures of adiposity and insulin sensitivity over 15 years. The CARDIA study (submitted to Human Molecular Genetics) • Abe N, Fornage M, Yang C-Y, Thanh N, Wise V, Rangaraj G, and Ballentyne CM. A negatively charged subfraction of LDL induces vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and CXC chemokines in endothelial cells (submitted to ATVB) • Yu X, Jacobs DR, Schreiner P, Gross M, Steffes MW, and Fornage M. Uncoupling Protein 2 Ala55Val Polymorphism is associated with Diabetes Mellitus: The CARDIA Study (revision submitted to Diabetologia) • Yu X, Jacobs DR, Steffes MW, Gross M, Schreiner P, and Fornage M. Patterns of Body Weight Change in Relation to the GNB3 C825T Polymorphism in the CARDIA Study (submitted to Int. J. Obesity) • Fornage M, Jacobs DR, Steffes M, Gross MD, Bray MS, and Schreiner P. Inverse Effects of the PPARγ2 Pro12Ala Polymorphism on Measures of Adiposity and Insulin Sensitivity over 15 Years in African-Americans and Whites - The CARDIA Study. Metabolism (in press)
  4. 4. • Taylor BC, Schreiner PJ, Doherty TM, Fornage M, Carr JJ, Sidney S. Matrix Gla Protein and Osteopontin Genetic Associations with Coronary Artery Calcification and Bone Density: The CARDIA Study. Human Genetics 2005, Mar 3 epub • Schwartz GL, Fornage M, Mosley T, Turner ST. Treatment of Leukoaraiosis. Curr. Treatment Opt. Cardiovasc. Med. 2005, (in press) • Hinojos C, Boerwinkle E, Fornage M, Doris PA. Combined genealogical, mapping, and expression approaches to identify SHR hypertension candidate genes. Hypertension 2005, 45: 698-704 • Turner ST, Fornage M, Jack CR, Moseley TH, Kardia SL, Boerwinkle E, de Andrade M. Genomic Susceptibility Loci for Brain Atrophy in Hypertensive Sibships from the GENOA study. Hypertension 2005, 45: 793-798 • Fornage M, Lopez DS, Roseman JM, Siscovick DS, Wong ND, and Boerwinkle E. Parental history of myocardial infarction and stroke predicts coronary artery calcification: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention 2004, 11: 421-426 • Lisabeth LD, Kardia SLR, Smith MA, Fornage M, and Morgenstern LB. Family History of Stroke among Mexican American and Non Hispanic White Stroke and TIA Cases: Implications for the Feasibility and Design of Stroke Genetics Research. Neuroepidemiology 2005, 24: 96-102 • Fornage M, Boerwinkle E, Doris PA, Jacobs D, Liu K, Wong ND. Polymorphism of the Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase is associated with Coronary Artery Calcification in African- Americans: The CARDIA Study. Circulation 2004, 109: 335-339 • Turner ST, Jack CR, Fornage M, Moseley TH, Boerwinkle E, de Andrade M. Heritability of Leukoaraiosis in Hypertensive Sibships. Hypertension 2004, 43: 483-487 • Fornage M, Swank MW, Boerwinkle E, Doris PA. Gene expression profiling and functional proteomic analysis reveal perturbed kinase-mediated signaling in stroke susceptibility. Physiol. Genomics 2003, 15: 75-83 • Dutta R, Singh U, Li TB, Fornage M, Teng BB. Hepatic gene expression profiling reveals perturbed calcium signaling in a mouse model lacking both LDL receptor and Apobec1 genes. Atherosclerosis 2003, 169:51-62 • McDermott MM, Greenland P, Green D, Guralnik JM, Criqui MH, Liu K, Chan C, Pearce WH, Taylor L, Ridker PM, Schneider JR, Martin G, Rifai N, Quann M, and Fornage M. D-dimer, inflammatory markers, and lower extremity functioning in patients with and without peripheral arterial disease. Circulation 2003, 107: 3191-3198 • Turner ST and Fornage M. Genetics of Leukoaraiosis. Sem. Cerebrovasc. Dis. Stroke 2002, 2: 35-45, • Fornage M, Hinojos CA, Nurowska BW, Boerwinkle E, Hammock BD, Morisseau CH, Doris PA. Polymorphism in soluble epoxide hydrolase and blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Hypertension 2002, 40: 485-90 • Gabriel SB, Salomon R, Pelet A, Angrist M, Amiel J, Fornage M, Attie-Bitach T, Olson JM, Hofstra R, Buys C, Steffann J, Munnich A, Lyonnet S, Chakravarti A. Segregation at three loci explains familial and population risk in Hirschsprung disease. Nature Genetics 2002, 31: 89-93 • Province MA, Boerwinkle E, Chakravarti A, Cooper R, Fornage M, Leppert M, Risch N, Ranade K. Lack of association of the angiotensinogen -6 polymorphism with blood pressure levels in the comprehensive NHLBI Family Blood Pressure Program. National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. Journal of Hypertension 2000, 18: 867-76 • Fornage M, Doris PA. Use of single nucleotide polymorphisms for gene discovery in hypertension. Current Hypertension Reports 2000, 2: 23-31
  5. 5. • Morrison AC, Fornage M, Liao D, Boerwinkle E. Parental history of stroke predicts subclinical but not clinical stroke: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. Stroke 2000, 31: 2098-102 • Schork NJ, Chakravarti A, Thiel B, Fornage M, Jacob HJ, Cai R, Rotimi CN, Cooper RS, Weder AB. Lack of association between a biallelic polymorphism in the adducin gene and blood pressure in whites and African Americans. American Journal of Hypertension 2000, 13: 693-8 • Boerwinkle E, Doris PA, Fornage M. Field of needs: the genetics of stroke. Circulation 1999, 99: 331-3 • Fornage M, Amos CI, Kardia S, Sing CF, Turner ST, and Boerwinkle E. Variation in the region of the angiotensin-converting enzyme influences interindividual differences in blood pressure levels in young White males. Circulation 1998, 97: 1773-1779 • Fornage M, Turner ST, Sing CF, and Boerwinkle E. Variation at the M235T locus of the angiotensinogen gene and essential hypertension: A population-based case-control study from Rochester, MN. Human Genetics 1995, 96: 295-300 • Fornage M, Chan L, Siest G, Boerwinkle E. Allele frequency distribution of the (TG)n(AG)m microsatellite in the apolipoprotein C-II gene. Genomics 1992 12: 63-8 • Chakraborty R, Fornage M, Gueguen R, Boerwinkle E. Population genetics of hypervariable loci: analysis of PCR based VNTR polymorphism within a population. EXS 1991, 58: 127-43 Book Chapters • Boerwinkle E, Fornage M: Genetics of Lp(a) Lipoprotein. An Evolving Paradigm. In Genetics of Coronary Heart Disease. Bearn AG, Ed. Oslo, Norway, Institute of Medical Genetics - University of Oslo, 1992, p. 33-52 • Fornage M, Doris PA: Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Genotyping for Disease Association Studies. In Hypertension: Methods & Protocols. Fennell JP and Baker AH, Eds. Totowa, NJ, Humana Press, 2005, p159-172. PRESENTATIONS AT LOCAL, NATIONAL, AND INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCES • “Gene Expression Profiling and Stroke Susceptibility” Poster presented at the 6th Annual Meeting of the European Council for Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Research, October 26-29, 2001 • “Gene Expression Profiling in Experimental Stroke” Poster presented at the Keystone Symposium – Stroke: Molecular, Cellular, Pharmacological and Development of New Therapeutics, March 9-14, 2002 • “Gene Expression Profiling and Functional Proteomic Approaches to Stroke Susceptibility in the Stroke-Prone SHR” Poster presented at the American Stroke Association 28th International Stroke Conference, February 13-15, 2003 • “Parental History of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke Predicts Coronary Artery Calcification: The CARDIA Study” Poster presented at the American Heart Association 43rd Annual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention, March 5-8, 2003 • “Polymorphism of the Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase is associated with coronary artery calcification in African-Americans: The CARDIA Study” Poster presented at the American Heart Association 2003 Scientific Sessions, November 9-12, 2003
  6. 6. • “Gene-Diet Interactions in Stroke Susceptibility” Invited Platform Talk at the American Heart Association 2003 Scientific Sessions, November 9-12, 2003 • “Functional Genomic Approaches to Target Organ Damage in Hypertension” Invited Talk at the 8th Annual Human and Molecular Genetics Symposium, University of Texas – Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, March 15, 2004 • “Genomic Approaches to Stroke” Invited Talk at the 24th Princeton Conference, April 2-4, 2004 • “From Rats to Humans: Identification of genes contributing to target organ damage in hypertension” Young Investigator Award Talk at the 11th International Symposium on the SHR and Cardiovascular Risk - Genetics to Disease Prevention, May 16-17, 2004 • “Variation in the Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Gene and Coronary Artery Calcification: The CARDIA Study” Invited Talk at the Winter Eicosanoids Meeting, March 20-23, 2005 • “Haplotype Analyses of the PPARγ Gene in Relation to Body Mass Index (BMI) in Young Adults” Poster presented at the American Heart Association 45th Annual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention, April 29-May 1, 2005 PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES American Society of Human Genetics (2001 – Present) SERVICE ON NATIONAL PEER-REVIEW PANELS Grants • Member, American Heart Association Brain Study Section (2002 – Present) • Ad Hoc Reviewer, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (2003) Journals • Reviewer for Genetic Epidemiology (1998 – 2000) • Reviewer for the European Journal of Human Genetics (2003) • Reviewer for the American Journal of Epidemiology (2003) • Reviewer for Circulation (2000-present) • Reviewer for the American Journal of Hypertension (2004-present) • Reviewer for Pharmacogenetics (2004-present) • Reviewer for Diabetologia (2004-present) • Reviewer for Cardiovascular Research (2005-present) Conferences • Moderator, Session 5 “Hot Topics”; 6th Annual Meeting of the European Council for Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Research, Noordwijkerhout, The Netherlands, October 26-29, 2001 • Reviewer, Abstracts submitted to the 2004 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions; Experimental Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes SERVICE ON GRADUATE SCHOOL COMMITTEES
  7. 7. • Chair, Advisory and Examining Committee for Mandi Corenblum; M.S. in Biomedical Sciences • Member, Advisory and Examining Committee Member for Magalie Leduc, Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences • Member, Advisory Committee Member for Tracy Bishop, Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences • Member, Examination Committee for the 2003 Ph.D. Candidacy Examination of the Program in Human and Molecular Genetics, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences • Member, 2003 Schissler Foundation Scholarship Committee SERVICE ON UNIVERSITY COMMITTEES • Member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for the University Clinical Research Center (July 2003 – present) • Member of the Research Subcommittee of the Information Technology Governance Council STATEMENT OF RESEARCH INTERESTS AND EXPERIENCE My research interests focus on the genetic basis of complex traits with an emphasis on cerebrovascular disease and stroke. Although the third leading cause of death and a leading cause of adult disability, stroke and other cerebrovascular disorders have been under-studied. In the past three years, I have developed a coordinated research program on the genetics of stroke and related cerebrovascular diseases. This translational and highly collaborative research effort aims to link experimental and animal model research findings to issues of clinical and public health relevance. Specifically, my work is directed at understanding the molecular basis of stroke and cerebrovascular disorders using functional genomic approaches and genetic epidemiology techniques applied to both animal models and humans. Work in my laboratory employs microarray gene expression profiling and 2D gel electrophoresis proteomic analysis to identify genes and gene pathways contributing to stroke susceptibility in the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP), and to understand how these genes and gene pathways interact with dietary factors to modulate stroke onset in these animals. We have determined that kinase-mediated signaling was altered in the cortex of stroke prone rats prior to the onset of stroke. Moreover, we have recently showed that unlike the stroke resistant strain SHR, protein kinase gene expression and activity did not change in response to dietary perturbation in the SHRSP. Whether SHRSP’s inability to shift expression of these kinases in response to diet contributes to pathophysiology is being investigated. Discovery of the molecular mechanisms contributing to increased susceptibility to brain lesions in the SHRSP animal model provides the basis for investigation of these pathogenetic mechanisms in the development of human cerebrovascular disease and stroke. My laboratory also investigates whether variation in the human homologues/ orthologues of the genes identified in the rat model influences risk of developing stroke in the human population. For example, the soluble epoxide hydrolase gene is being investigated for its relationship to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease in humans. A functional polymorphism was genotyped in the Coronary Artery Disease Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study participants and was found associated with coronary artery calcification, a marker of atherosclerosis and predictor of stroke.
  8. 8. My research strategy to understand the genetic basis of complex neurological disorders is to integrate genome variation (sequence or functional) with patterns of gene expression with variation in the proteome (i.e. protein quantities or characteristics) with various physiological measures and, finally, with predictors of health and disease. Links: http://www.uth.tmc.edu/uth_orgs/imm/fornage.htm http://www.uthouston.edu/distinctions/archive/2002/may/decoding_genetics.html

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