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    Course Description Template Course Description Template Document Transcript

    • New Course Description A. COVER PAGE 1. Course Title Forensics Biology 9. Subject Area 2. Transcript Title(s)/Abbreviation(s) ❏ a-History / Social Science * {see list of abbreviations below} ❏ b-English ❏ c-Mathematics ✔ d-Laboratory Science 3. Transcript Course Code(s)/Number(s) ❏ e-Language Other than English * {see list of codes below} ❏ f-Visual & Performing Arts ❏ Intro ❏ Advanced 4. School / Program ❏ g-Elective Eastlake High School Category Biological Science 5. District Sweetwater Union High School District 6. City 10. Grade Level Chula Vista 11th, 12th 7. School / District / Program Web Site 11. Seeking "Honors" Distinction? www.suhsd.k12.ca.us//elh// ❏ Yes ✔ No If yes, which type? 8. School / Program Course List Contact Person 1) 12. Unit Value Name: Nancy Nieto ❏ 0.5 (half year of semester equivalent 2) Title/Position: Counselor ✔ 1.0 (one year equivalent) ❏ 2.0 (two year equivalent) 3) Phone: (619) 216-5040 ❏ Other: 4) E-mail: nancy.nieto@suhsd.k12.ca.us 13. Is this internet-based course? ❏ Yes ✔ No If yes, the provider is: 14. Was this course previously approved by UC? ❏ Yes ✔ No If yes, check all that apply: ❏ Course reinstated after removal within 3 years Year removed from List? Same course title? ❏ Yes ❏ No If no, previous course title? ❏ Identical course approved at another school in same district Which school? Same course title? ❏ Yes ❏ No If no, course title at other school? ❏ Alternative course title for course with identical content at this school Title of previously-approved identical course: ❏ Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course ❏ Approved UC College Prep (UCCP) Initiative course ❏ Year-long VPA course replacing two approved successive semester-long courses in the same discipline ❏ Approved P.A.S.S. course ❏ Approved ROP/C course Name of ROP/C?
    • ❏ Other (explain): 15. Is this course modeled after an UC-approved course from another school/program outside your school? ❏ Yes ✔ No If so, which school/program? Course title at other school: FOR 16. Pre-Requisites Must pass Biology and Chemistry with a grade of "C" or better 17. Co-Requisites REFERENCE 18. Is this course a resubmission? ✔ Yes ❏ No If yes, date(s) of previous submission? 2004 Title of previous submission: Forensics Biology 19. Brief Course Description Forensic Biology is a two-semester college preparatory course that meets the UC lab science criteria. It ONLY builds upon California Biology Standards in the areas of cellular biology, genetics, ecology, and human physiology, the California Chemistry Standards in the areas of Organic and Biochemistry and reaction rates, and the California Investigation and Experimentation Standards. The course will incorporate lecture, laboratory activities, guest speakers, expository reading, and discovery learning. The course emphasizes critical thinking and an on-hands approach to problem solving in the forensic science of biology. Comprehensive written exams, lab practical exams, and group and independent projects will be used to evaluate students. * Transcript Title / Abbreviations: 1. Forensics Bio 1 (with course code / number 2673) 2. Forensics Bio 2 (with course code / number 2674) Course Description 2
    • A. COVER PAGE Date of Submission (Please include Month, Day and Year) 1. Course Title 9. Subject Area Forensic Biology History/Social Science 2. Transcript Title(s) / Abbreviation(s) English Mathematics 3. Transcript Course Code(s) / Number(s) X Laboratory Science Language other than English 4. School FOR Eastlake High School Visual & Performing Arts 5. District Intro Advanced Sweetwater Union High School District College Prep Elective 6. City 10. Grade Level(s) for which this course is designed Chula Vista 9 10 X 11 X 12 REFERENCE 7. School / District Web Site 11. Seeking “Honors” Distinction? Yes X No 8. School Course List Contact 12. Unit Value Name: 0.5 (half year or semester equivalent) Title/Position: X 1.0 (one year equivalent) ONLY Phone: Ext.: 2.0 (two year equivalent) E-mail: Other: _______________________________ 13. Is this an Internet-based course? Yes X No If “Yes”, who is the provider? UCCP PASS/Cyber High Other __ 14. Complete outlines are not needed for courses that were previously approved by UC. If course was previously approved, indicate in which category it falls. A course reinstated after removal within 3 years. Year removed from list? ___________ Same course title? Yes No If no, previous course title? ___________________________________________________________ An identical course approved at another school in same district. Which school? Same course title? Yes No If no, course title at other school? ______________________________________________________ Approved Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) course Approved UC College Prep (UCCP) Online course Year-long VPA course replacing two approved successive semester courses in the same discipline Approved P.A.S.S./Cyber High course Approved ROP/C course. Name of ROP/C? ______________________________________________ Approved CDE Agricultural Education course Other. Explain: _____________________________________________________________________ 15. Is this course modeled after an UC-approved course from another school outside your district? Yes No 3
    • 16. Pre-Requisites Biology, C or better both semesters and algebra 1 17. Co-Requisites Concurrent enrollment in Chemistry if not already taken 18. Is this course a resubmission? X Yes No If yes, date(s) of previous submission? _________________________________________________________ Title of previous submission? ________________________________________________________________ 19. Brief Course Description Forensic Biology is a two-semester college preparatory course that meets the UC lab science criteria. It builds upon FOR California Biology Standards in the areas of cellular biology, genetics, ecology, and human physiology, the California Chemistry Standards in the areas of Organic and Biochemistry and reaction rates, and the California Investigation and Experimentation Standards. The course will incorporate lecture, laboratory activities, guest speakers, expository reading, and discovery learning. The course emphasizes critical thinking and an on-hands approach to problem solving in the forensic science of biology. Comprehensive written exams, lab practical exams, and group and independent projects will be used to evaluate students. REFERENCE B. COURSE CONTENT ONLY Please refer to instructions 20. Course Goals and/or Major Student Outcomes (ESLRs) 1. Students will become self-directed learners • Complete at least one research project and present it in class. • Learn laboratory safety rules to protect their physical wellness in the class. • Learn the importance of ethics and honesty in producing lab reports and other products. 2. Students will become culturally empowered community members • Learn scientific concepts through real-life examples that stress the contributions of a diverse scientific community and impact of those contributions on society and the environment. • Work with all students in a lab setting. 3. Students will become effective communicators • Students will read, write, listen, and speak using appropriate vocabulary--both scientific and general--throughout the course. • Students will be expected to use correct grammar and style when producing written assignments such as lab reports. • Cooperative groups will be structured to foster good listening and speaking skills. • Technology will be integrated wherever appropriate for research, manipulation, or production of work. • Oral and written presentation skills will be emphasized in projects. 4. Students will become productive individuals • Laboratory experiences in Forensic Biology require problem solving and critical thinking skills. • Long term and cooperative group assignments will require students to develop successful planning, research, and organizational strategies, and to learn to use resources effectively, individually and as a group. 4
    • 21. Course Objectives Students will be expected to do/understand the following: 1. Perform metric calculations and accurately represent scientific units. 2. Accurately use a microscope to locate and identify specimens. 3. Understand the fields of forensics in which a biologist can specialize. 4. List the four macromolecules, their characteristics, and explain why their structure determines how they are collected as evidence. FOR 5. Describe the difference between prokaryotes and eukaryotes as well as differences between the four tissue types. 6. Describe the structure and function of DNA, the process of DNA replication, the methods used to process and analyze DNA, and explain why one method is preferred over the others in the field of forensics. 7. Explain the Hardy-Weinberg equation and why it is important in determining the frequency of an allele or DNA profile in the population. 8. Understand why punnett squares and pedigrees can be used to determine genetic REFERENCE relationships between individuals. 9. Identify the stages in the life cycle of a gymnosperm and an angiosperm and explain why pollen can be used as evidence. 10. Identify the stages in the life cycle of an insect (blow flies) and explain why the stage of development can be used to estimate time of death. 11. Describe the structure and function of skin and explain why fingerprint can be used to identify individuals as well as what part of the skin they come from. ONLY 12. Describe the structure of hair and why it can be used to identify individuals. 13. List the major bones in the body and describe the process of bone formation. Explain why bones and muscles on the skull (identify these bones and muscles) can be used to aid in the process of facial reconstruction. 14. List the major muscles in the body and explain the process of muscle contraction along with the effects of aerobic and anaerobic respiration on muscle. 15. Describe the stages a body goes through as it decomposes. Explain what happens to the body in rigor mortis, livor mortis, and algor mortis, and why each process can help estimate time of death. 16. Explain the process of respiration and trace the path of air from the mouth to the alveoli. Explain the effects and causes of wet and dry drowning on the respiratory system. 17. Identify parts of the cardiovascular system, the parts of blood, and their functions. 18. Explain why luminol and fluorescin can be used to identify the presence of blood. 19. Describe how blood spatter analysis is used to find the point of origin of a weapon. 20. Explain the process of digestion, including the organs and their functions, where mechanical and chemical digestion occur, and where the macromolecules are broken down. 21. Explain how long food spends in each organ of digestion and why this knowledge can help estimate time of death. 22. Describe the process of excretion, including the organs involved and their functions. Explain why urinalysis tests can provide information about the health of this system. 23. List the parts of the reproduction system and explain why PGM can be used to identify the presence of sperm. 5
    • 22. Course Outline Standard 1 – Explain the History of Forensic Biology 1.1 Compare and contrast forensic techniques prior to 1900 with the present. 1.2 Recognize the types of forensic biology and their associated careers. Standard 2 – (Lab techniques and organic molecules) Recognize and demonstrate the use of proper laboratory and field techniques used by forensic biologists to gather and analyze evidence 2.1 Utilize the metric system to make accurate measurements. 2.2 Demonstrate proper use of microscopic techniques when looking at slides and cells. 2.3 Compare and contrast the 4 macromolecules in terms of function, structure, basic unit, and elements. Explain why these molecules are considered organic. FOR 2.4 Select and describe the proper methods to collect and preserve biological evidence such as blood and DNA and why that method is used to preserve the state of the macromolecule (proteins and nucleic acids). Standard 3 – (Cells) Recognize major cell types and organelles 3.1 Distinguish between plant, animal, eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells 3.2 Identify and differentiate cell organelles and their functions. 3.3 Identify and differentiate the four major tissue types (type of cells, structure, location, and function). REFERENCE Standard 4 – (DNA) Explain the techniques used to process and analyze DNA in a forensic setting 4.1 Describe the structure and function of DNA. 4.2 Explain the process of DNA replication and how mutations occur. 4.3 Explain how DNA is processed using PCR and RFLP analysis. 4.4 Compare and contrast STR and RFLP analysis and describe the benefit of using STR. 4.5 Distinguish between appropriate uses of mitochondrial DNA and chromosomal DNA. 4.6 Investigate the purpose and importance of CODIS. ONLY Standard 5 – (Genetics) Apply Mendel’s principles of genetics to solve problems in forensic biology 5.1 Use Punnett squares to solve problems involving ABO/Rh blood types and why Punnett Squares are used. 5.2 Identify the alleles for blood type and the different genotypes and phenotypes (include Rh). 5.3 Use pedigrees to determine mode of inheritance of various genetic traits and explain the difference between these modes of inheritance. 5.4 Describe the importance of the Hardy-Weinberg equation and why it is important in determining DNA statistical information. Standard 6 – (Ecology) Describe the effect of biotic and abiotic influences on decomposition rates and forensic evidence 6.1 Describe the life cycle of a gymnosperm and angiosperm, identify the male and female parts, and explain why plant and pollen specimens can connect evidence to habitat 6.2 Describe the life cycle of an insect and explain how entomological evidence can be used to estimate time of death. 6.3 Explain how and why factors such as temperature, humidity, scavengers and insects influence decomposition rates. Explain why the process of decomposition is important in nutrient cycles. (Anatomy) Standard 7 – Apply knowledge of the integumentary system and its significance in forensic biology 7.1 Describe the structure, functions, parts of the integumentary system. 7.2 Identify and describe the three major types of fingerprints and methods of collection and processing 7.3 Investigate the purpose and importance of AFIS 7.4 Describe the structure and characteristics of hair fibers including human, animal, plant and synthetic Standard 8 – Apply knowledge of the skeletal system and its significance in forensic biology 8.1 Describe the structure and functions of the skeletal system 8.2 Identify major bones in the body. 8.3 Describe why skeletal remains and/or mathematical formulas (Dapertuis and Hadden) can determine sex, age, height and ethnicity based on the bone. 6
    • 8.4 Identify major bones in the face and explain why they can be used to aid in the technique of facial reconstruction as well as how these craniofacial bones differ in race (identify major muscles of the face here as well.) 8.5 Evaluate cause of skeletal trauma and why it can alter the process of ossification and bone structure. Standard 9 – Apply knowledge of muscular system and its significance in forensic biology 9.1 Describe the structure and function of muscular system. 9.2 Explain how muscle contraction occurs and the affect that aerobic and anaerobic respiration have on muscle performance (lactic acid and fatigue). 9.3 Determine the cause of rigor mortis and why it can help estimate time of death. 9.4 Describe algor mortis and why it can help estimate of time of death. Standard 10 – Apply knowledge of cardiovascular system and its significance in forensic biology FOR 10.1 Describe the structure, parts, and function of cardiovascular system 10.2 Identify the components of blood, their structure, and their function. 10.3 Explain why Luminol and Fluorescin can identify the presence of blood and describe the reaction that occurs between the chemical and the blood. 10.4 Relate livor mortis and explain how it can be used to estimate time of death. 10.5 Analyze blood spatter to determine method of spatter, angle of impact, and point of convergence REFERENCE Standard 11 – Apply knowledge of respiratory system and its significance in forensic biology 11.1 Describe the structure and function of the respiratory system 11.2 Trace the path of air through the respiratory system. 11.3 Describe why blood alcohol content can be determined from a breathalyzer test 11.4 Compare and contrast wet and dry drowning, and asphyxiation Standard 12 - Apply knowledge of the digestive and excretory systems and their significance in forensic biology 12.1 Describe the structure and function of both the excretory and digestive systems as well as the function of ONLY their parts. 12.2 Compare and contrast mechanical and chemical digestion in terms of location and what macromolecule is broken down where. 12.3 Label the parts of a tooth and the buccal, lingual, distal, and occusal sides, and explain why bite marks can be used as forensic evidence 12.3 Explain why undigested food can estimate time of death knowing how long food spends in the organs of digestion. 12.4 Explain why urinalysis is used to detect blood alcohol, drug use, and infections. Standard 13 – Apply knowledge of the male and female reproductive systems and their significance in forensic biology 13.1 Describe the structure and function of both the male and female reproductive systems. 13.2 Explain why PGM can be used to detect or observe spermatozoa. 23. Texts & Supplemental Instructional Materials • Text: Biology, Prentice Hall, Miller and Levine, and Criminalists, an Introduction to Forensic Science (8th Edition), Richard Saferstein, Prentice Hall • Lab Manual: Criminalists, an Introduction to Forensic Science (8th Edition), Richard Saferstein, Prentice Hall 7
    • Addtional resources • Forensic Science Handbook, Volume 2 2nd edition, Saferstein • Death’s Acre, Dr. William Bass and Jefferson (insect life cycles) • Forensic Art and Illustration, Karen Taylor Thomas (facial anatomy) • http://www.cstl.nist.gov/div831/strbase/ (STR online lab) • http://www.sirinet.net/~jgjohnso/lifecyclesplants.html (plant life cycles for pollen evidence) • http://myweb.dal.ca/jvandomm/forensicbotany/ (forensic botany homepage for pollen evidence) • http://www.deathonline.net (decomposition information) • http://www.raka.co.za/anthropology/faces/ (facial reconstruction) FOR 24. Key Assignments Standard 1 – Explain the History of Forensic Biology 1. Create a timeline that includes major developments in forensic biology from the 1800s on 2. Research and investigate careers in forensic biology REFERENCE 3. Written Assignment--Compare and contrast techniques used prior to 1900 and the present after watching “History’s Mystery: an Introduction to Forensic Science” Standard 2 – Recognize and demonstrate the use of proper laboratory and field techniques used by forensic biologists to gather and analyze evidence 1. Lab- Metric System Lab where students measure in m, cm, mm, mL, cc, g, and kg and perform conversions. 2. Density lab 3. Lab- Given several specimens, demonstrate proper choice of microscope, proper preparation of the specimen, ONLY and proper use of the equipment (Expt. 4 from Saferstein) 4. Make a poster that compares and contrasts compound microscopes, stereoscopes, and comparison scopes and their appropriate uses. 5. Make a chart comparing the macromolecules and list their function, structure, basic unit, and elements. 6. Write a paper explaining why the structure of the macromolecules (DNA, proteins in blood) determines how it is collected as evidence. 7. Mock crime scene- students will process biological evidence left at a crime scene using the proper techniques to preserve the evidence. Standard 3 – Recognize major cell types and organelles 1. Observe the 4 tissue types under a microscope 2. Compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells as well as plant and animal cells. Standard 4 – Explain the techniques used to process and analyze DNA in a forensic setting 1. Online STR lab 2. Diagram and describe the structure of DNA 3. Written Assignment- An immigrant shows up at an airport and is met by his purported mother. How could you determine if she is indeed his mother? 4. Anaylze STR printouts to determine relationships between suspect and DNA evidence 5. Research and present on the levels of CODIS and the types of DNA evidence found in the system. 6. Create a chart comparing and contrasting STR analysis and RFLP. 7. Mitochondrial DNA lab from Wards – extract and sequence mtDNA 8. Compare and contrast mtDNA and nuclear DNA. Standard 5 – Apply Mendel’s principles of genetics to solve problems in forensic biology 1. Solve Punnet Square problems involving blood types. 2. Create a chart that lists all possible combinations of ABO/Rh blood types (genotype and phenotype). Include a column that lists antibodies present in each type of blood, a column for antigens present on the surface of the cell, and a column that shows which types of blood a victim could safely receive during a transfusion 3. Create a pedigree of 3 generations of their family using appropriate symbols 4. Analyze a pedigree to determine if a trait is sex-linked or autosomal. 8
    • 5. Use the Hardy-Weinberg equation to determine the allele frequencies for a trait. Standard 6 – Describe the effect of biotic and abiotic influences on decomposition rates and forensic evidence 1. Draw and label the life cycle of a gymnosperm and angiosperm. 2. Draw and label the life cycle of a blow fly (insect). 3. Construct a chart of major plant or pollen species used to connect evidence in different habitats/ environments. 4. Entomology Lab- Determine the approximate time of death. You discover 2nd instar larvae of S. cooley, and 1st instar larvae of C. vomitoria and C. terranovae, Reference Wards Lab. 5. Write a paper explaining why the insect life cycle is used to help find the approximate time of death of a person. Include how temperature and humidity affect the stage of insect development. 6. Written Assignment- Compare and contrast the processes that directly affect decomposition rates of the human body: decay by insects, depth of burial, and the number of carnivores in the area.. 7. Lab- Using frog specimens, compare the rate of decay in water and on land over the period of one week. FOR Standard 7 – Apply knowledge of the integumentary system and its significance in forensic biology 1. Draw a diagram of the three layers of skin. Label each layer, its components and describe each layer’s function. 2. Draw a diagram of human hair and label the parts. Explain where living and dead cells are found and what part of the hair each composes. 3. Lab - Using slides, observe, draw, and label the major parts of human hair and animal hair. Then REFERENCE observe and compare to slides of fibers. 4. Diagram and describe the major patterns found in human fingerprints. 5. Written Assignment- Explain how fingerprints are classified. 6. Labs- At a simulated crime scene, collect fingerprints using black powder, gray aluminum, and white powder to analyze fingerprints and recognize points of verification. 7. (Extra) Written Assignment- Compare and contrast the advantages and disadvantages between human comparison of fingerprints and the use of an AFIS database ONLY Standard 8 – Apply knowledge of the skeletal system and its significance in forensic biology 1. Identify major bones in the body from a disarticulated skeleton. 2. Draw and label a bone (periosteum, compact bone, spongy bone, and the canals) 3. Lab- Given a container of skeletal remains, reconstruct the skeleton making note of any missing bones. 4. Lab- Use skeletal remains and/or mathematical formulas (Dapertuis and Hadden) to determine the sex, approximate age, and height. 5. Written Assignment- Human skeletal remains are found in a shallow grave. They have been partially destroyed by predators and some bones are missing. Explain how you would determine the approximate height, age, and sex of the victim. 6. Label the major bones of the face and then use them to perform a facial reconstruction on a skull. 7. Given a skull with bone trauma and several choices of weapons, determine which weapon caused the trauma. Explain how a change in the process of ossification (from trauma) can aid in this process. Standard 9 – Apply knowledge of muscular system and its significance in forensic biology 1. Written Assignment- Write an essay describing the process of muscle contraction. 2. Draw and label the parts of a muscle. 3. Identity the major muscle groups found in the human body from a picture or model. 4. Compare and contrast rigor mortis and algor mortis. 5. Written Assignment- Explain why the rate of heat loss is influenced by other factors such as the location and size of the body, the victims clothing, and weather conditions. Include why this involves dead muscle tissue. 6. Estimate the victim’s time of death using chart of temperature data collected at the crime scene. Standard 10 – Apply knowledge of cardiovascular system and its significance in forensic biology 1. Draw and label the parts of the heart and use arrows to trace the path of blood. 2. Lab- Dissect sheep/pig hearts to visualize the flow of blood through the heart as well as the major components of the heart. 3. Research the topics of stroke and heart attack as causes of death. Create an informative brochure that details what causes strokes and heart attacks and how they affect the circulatory system. Include information on how medical investigators can determine these conditions as causes of death during autopsy. 9
    • 4. Lab- Basics of Bloodtyping lab (Ward’s). 5. List the major components of human blood. Choose one component to be removed from the blood and describe what effect this missing component would have on the body. 6. Create a chart that compares Luminol, Kastle-Meyet's solution, and Fluorescin as methods for blood detection. Explain why these are used to detect blood (what reaction is happening with the blood?). 7. Lab- At a simulated crime scene, perform three different tests for the presence of blood. Determine which of the tests is the most sensitive. 8. Write a paper to explain why livor mortis can be used to estimate time of death. 9. Lab- Blood Spatter Lab to find where the point of origin. Standard 11 – Apply knowledge of respiratory system and its significance in forensic biology 1. Draw and label a picture of the respiratory system. Use arrows to trace the path of air. FOR 2. Written Assignment- List the pathways and the important gas involved from the moment of inhaling through the nasal passage to the moment of exhaling through the same opening. Be sure to indicate all sites of gas exchange. 3. Written Assignment- A corpse is found in the city park and foul play is suspected. Describe how you would determine if the victim drowned or was placed in the water after being strangled? 4. Lab Activity- Look at several breathalyzer printouts and determine if the blood-alcohol level exceeds the legal limit set by the state of California Explain how the breathalyzer works. REFERENCE 5. Draw a schematic showing the pathway of air flow in a breathalyzer. Standard 12 - Apply knowledge of the digestive and excretory systems and their significance in forensic biology 1. Draw and label a picture of the digestive and excretory system or create a 3-D model of a digestive system and label the parts. 2. Create a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast mechanical and chemical digestion. 3. Draw and label the parts of a tooth. 4. Written Assignment- Describe how dental impressions are taken as evidence from a crime scene using ONLY photography and silicone casting. 5. Lab Activity- Reproducing Bite Marks 6. Create a timeline that illustrates the amount of time it takes food to enter and exit the body. 7. From pictures taken of the stomach after death, estimate the time of death of the victim based on stomach contents. 8. Written Assignment -Create a chart of all reagents used in urinalysis screen tests, the chemical that they test for, and the color change that occurs. 9. Lab - Perform a urinalysis test on mock urine (or real), analyze the results, and create a report on the findings. Standard 13 – Apply knowledge of the male and female reproductive systems and their significance in forensic biology 1. Create a diagram of the male and female reproductive systems. Label all major structures and describe their function. 2. Written Assignment- Draw and label a diagram of a spermatozoa. Include on your drawing a list of the other components of semen. 3. Written Assignment- explain why the acid phosphatase test is used to identity semen. 25. Instructional Methods and/or Strategies Primary Methods • Lecture • Power Point • Direct Instruction • Labs • Reading for content (articles, books, newspaper) Other methods • Cooperative learning 10
    • • Internet based activities • Guest speakers • TV programs (court tv, discovery channel) 26. Assessment Methods and/or Tools Students will be assessed using the following methods: • Lab practicals • Lab reports • Oral reports and presentations FOR • Tests and quizzes • Homework and class work • Group presentations Grade break down • Assessments = 70% of the grades (quizzes, lab reports/ practicals, papers, and tests with the Final exam weighing 15 %) REFERENCE • Class work and homework = 30 %. D. OPTIONAL BACKGROUND INFORMATION ONLY 22. Context for Course Eastlake High School currently has a smaller learning communities grant and is in the process of creating pathways. One pathway is going to be called Criminal Justice, in which Forensic Biology would fulfill the science requirement. Other schools in the Sweetwater District also have Criminal Justice Pathways, and one school even has a program with the police department. 23. History of Course Development It has been a true challenge trying to get a D credit for this course. This will be our third submission, and we are determined to keep working until we receive the approval. After speaking with the high school articulation analyst after the second denial, we went back and changed the objectives and outline to focus more on the "whys" and not the "hows" to make this course less of an application course and more a Biology course. We realize that some of the content and labs are from a forensic approach, but only because this is a forensic biology course. Many of the assignments and objectives are solely biology to review the biology content that the students learned the prior year so we can build upon this information. After we edited the material, it was sent out for final review before the third submittal. The document was sent to six of the science experts on the UC list as well as to the high school articulation analyst; unfortunately, none of the experts replied and the high school analyst replied she could not review the course. We then sent it to the Dean of Biology at UCI, UCLA, and UCSD for their possible review of the focus in biology. One replied he could not review it and to contact the experts again, one did not reply, and one replied connecting us to other people within the UC system. We hope that the UC Approval Board recognizes our efforts to make this course worthy of the D credit, and getting feedback from the UC system has been challenging. When this course was written, it was based on the California State Content Standards in Biology. This was done as instructed by the UC analysts that were consulted during the creation of the course. We believe that our course has met the criteria set out by the UC Approval Board to receive a D lab credit, but would like to receive a G credit if this does not happen. 11
    • This course has been in development for two years. As CSI became more popular on television, student interest in forensics has grown exponentially. As science teachers, we are always trying to find ways to gain student interest in science to better prepare them for secondary education. Experts in the field have helped to create this course and to edit content. Credit goes to Dr. Watson, a PhD in Forensic Biology at Ferris State University, and to the criminalists, biologists, and CSI techs at both the San Diego Sheriff's Crime Lab and the Chula Vista Crime Lab. We asked each specialist to review the course so that each standard was biological in nature, built on biology concepts, and that it could be taught in a forensic biology course. We are confident that the material included applies to forensic biology and will further the biology knowledge base since every standard is built on the state biology standards. FOR (To answer a question by the high school articulation analyst, fake blood recipes or cow blood will be used for the blood experiments.) REFERENCE ONLY 12