Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
AP BIOLOGY COURSE SYLLABUS
AP BIOLOGY COURSE SYLLABUS
AP BIOLOGY COURSE SYLLABUS
AP BIOLOGY COURSE SYLLABUS
AP BIOLOGY COURSE SYLLABUS
AP BIOLOGY COURSE SYLLABUS
AP BIOLOGY COURSE SYLLABUS
AP BIOLOGY COURSE SYLLABUS
AP BIOLOGY COURSE SYLLABUS
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

AP BIOLOGY COURSE SYLLABUS

849

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
849
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  1. AP BIOLOGY COURSE SYLLABUS  COURSE OVERVIEW  This course is a college­level biology course for competent and highly motivated high  school students and is designed to be the equivalent of a college­level introductory  biology course.  AP Biology differs significantly from your freshman/sophomore biology  course with respect to the kind of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered,  the kind of laboratory work done, and the time and effort required of you, the student.  The aim of this course is to provide you with the conceptual framework, factual  knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing  science of biology and to understand the applications of biology as they apply to you,  student and the world around you.  As a result, this course may be the most difficult, yet  most rewarding, class you will take during your high school career.  MEETING TIMES:  This course meets every other day for 90 minutes.  This schedule easily allows us  to spend more than 25% of our time in lab and to accomplish all 12 required AP  labs as well as numerous additional labs.  THEMES:  This course is centered on the 8 major themes from the AP Biology Course  Description:  Science as Process; Evolution; Energy Transfer; Continuity and  Change; Relationship of Structure and Function; Regulation; Interdependence in  Nature; and Science, Technology and Society.  We will expand on three areas of  biological principles and processes that were introduced in your previous biology  course:  (1) Molecules and Cells; (2) Genetics and Evolution; and (3) Organisms  and Populations.  We will explore these topics in considerable more detail.  LAB COMPONENT  Students work in small groups to complete the labs.  Students will have two class  periods to complete large, complex AP labs.  Day One of a lab involves setting up  the lab and answering a series of pre­lab questions so students are prepared to  efficiently complete the lab on the second day.  Students then analyze results and  formalize their conclusion which we then discuss at the beginning of the third  day.  Labs are then submitted for grading.  INDEPENDENT PROJECTS:  In September an individual project is introduced.  Students are required to design  a long­term experiment; to test and define their variables; to analyze and draw  conclusions; and finally to present their findings in both a written and poster  format.  Students have until March to complete their research project.  Weekly  checks on progress help ensure students are working continually on this project  throughout the year.  Students will then present their findings as a poster and  demonstration at our school­wide Science Expo in May. 1 
  2. TECHNOLOGY:  Students use computers regularly to research various topics.  Current events are  presented daily with each student required to present at least six times per year.  Computer simulations from the Campbell and Reece textbook help enrich  classroom lectures, discussion and labs.  We perform computer labs on mitosis,  meiosis, genetics, genetic engineering, photosynthesis, respiration, protein and  DNA synthesis and population genetics.  These labs add to the class work and  hands­on labs and help re­enforce topics that can be difficult to visualize and are  used to support the labs which are taught in a hands­on fashion.  Using our school website, we can collect and post individual data sets.  Students  can then merge the files, allowing each student to have their own set of data  within the larger set of class data.  The type of data collection allows students to  see science as a continual process and not a set of stagnant facts.  It allows them  to see how their contributions can have implications in data analysis and  conclusions.  Students are required to generate all tables and graphs in Excel,  using proper labels, titles and other necessary components for a formal display of  their data.  Statistical testing (mean, median, standard deviation) is required  whenever possible.  COMPETITIONS:  All students are expected to participate in at least two national competitions.  Past  students have competed in the DNA Day Essay Competition, INL Scholastic  Bowl, BSU Science Day and Science Olympiad.  Students may select their  competitions and as the program grows, we plan to offer more additional option.  In additional, the school holds a semesterly Science Expo.  AP students are  required to present a poster or project during each expo event.  NATURE OF SCIENCE DISCUSSION (DAY 1 ACTIVITY)  One of the most valuable lessons we have is our exploration of the nature of  science.  We begin by classifying questions as those that can or cannot be  answered by science.  This discussion is a wonderful lead into numerous topics  such as evolution, stem cell research and cloning.  Students realize there opinions,  ethics and morals cannot be tested by science, but that science respects their  opinion, but cannot answer questions of morality and ethics.  For numerous topics  throughout the semester students understand that they can have opinions, but that  science cannot answer all questions.  This activity enriches future class discussion  and debates on topics such as cloning, stem cell research, genetic diseases and  even evolution because students can separate concepts that which can from those  which cannot be answered by science.  We also clearly define a hypothesis, a theory and a law.  Students understand that  a theory has a tremendous amount of data and research to support it and that it is  not “just a theory”. 2 
  3. EVOLUTION  Evolution clearly unites all biological concepts.  The discussion of evolution and  the use of the term evolution and “change over time” are introduced early on in  our nature of science discussion.  Evolution is examined again during our  exploration of prokaryotes and eukaryotes when we discuss the membrane in­  folding theory and the theory of endosymbosis.  The concept of evolution and  change over time is interwoven into every unit and expanded upon in our  evolution unit prior to examining the kingdoms and phylogeny.  BOOKS:  th  ­Text – Biology, 6  edition. 2002. Campbell and Reece.  ­Lab Manuals o  AP Biology Laboratory Manual for Students  o  Boise State University General Biology I, Biology 191 Laboratory  nd  Manual, 2005, 2  edition.  BSU Faculty.  th  o  Boise State University Concepts of Biology Laboratory Manual, 2004, 4  edition.  BSU Faculty.  COURSE OBJECTIVES:  1)  To identify biological processes that occur in us and around us all day, everyday.  2)  To develop an appreciation for the diversity of life.  3)  To learn the basic structure, growth, metabolism, reproduction, physiology, and  genetics of cells and various organisms.  4)  To recognize evolutionary relationships and diversity among living organisms.  5)  To acquire basic knowledge of the structures and distinctive features of  prokaryotes, protists, fungi, plants and animals.  6)  To identify organisms and classify them within major taxonomic groups.  7)  To gain an understanding of human organs and organ systems.  8)  To identify impacts of human activities on the environment.  9)  To recognize ecological relationships among various organisms.  10) To demonstrate laboratory techniques using basic research skills and scientific  equipment.  11) To interpret laboratory data and summarize the results.  12) To develop problem solving and critical thinking skills needed to assess and solve  biologically­based questions.  FIRST SEMESTER  Chapters  UNIT 1: The Chemistry of Life  LECTURE AND DISCUSSION MATERIAL ·  The Chemical Context of Life…………………………………………..  2 ·  Water and the Fitness of the Environment………………………………  3 3 
  4. ·  Carbon and the Molecular Diversity of Life…………………………….  4 ·  The Structure and Function of Macromolecules………………………..  5 ·  An Introduction to Metabolism…………………………………………  6  LABORATORIES AND ACTIVITIES  ­AP Lab 2:  Enzyme Catalysis  ­Measurements,  Acids, Bases, Buffers, pH and the Scientific Method – BSU  General Biology I, Lab 1  ­Macromolecule Model Building – Use molecular model building kits to construct  and present macromolecules (proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrate and lipids) to  the instructor  ­Begin Independent Research Project  UNIT 2: The Cell  LECTURE AND DISCUSSION MATERIAL ·  A Tour of the Cell………………………………………………………  7 ·  Membrane Structure and Function……………………………………...  8 ·  Cellular Respiration: Harvesting Chemical Energy……………………..  9 ·  Photosynthesis…………………………………………………………..  10  LABORATORIES AND ACTIVITIES  ­Tour of the Cell ­ Microscope Lab, BSU General Biology I, Lab 2  o  Comparison of prokaryotes (Anabaena, and Nostoc and  Rhodospirillum) to eukaryotes and plant cells to animal cells  (cheek, onion and Elodea)  ­AP Lab 1:  Diffusion and Osmosis (and solutions)  Plasmolysis and Turgidity – Using potatoes to demonstrate osmosis in  living systems; modified from BSU General Biology Lab Manual  ­AP Lab 5:  Cell Respiration using Biology for Computers and Logger Pro  o  Fermentation of Sugars by Yeast  o  Cellular Respiration Rates  o  Design Your Own Respiration Lab  ­AP Lab 4:  Plant Pigments and Photosynthesis  ­Campbell Biology Labs – On­line labs related to photosynthesis and respiration  used as a review prior to the exam  UNIT 3: Mitosis and Meiosis  LECTURE AND DISCUSSION MATERIAL ·  Cell Communication……………………………………………………  11 ·  The Cell Cycle………………………………………………………….  12 ·  Meiosis and Sexual Life Cycles………………………………………...  13 ·  Mendel and the Gene Idea……………………………………………...  14 4
  5. LABORATORIES AND ACTIVITIES  ­AP Lab 3:  Mitosis and Meiosis  ­Mitosis and Meiosis Simulation Lab – Using pipe cleaners to represent  chromosomes, demonstrate the processes to the instructor.  ­Campbell Biology Labs – Review mitosis and meiosis on­line at the Campbell  Biology website.  ­Guest speaker from Idaho’s Oncology Institute visits to discuss treatments and long­  term care options for cancer patients.  UNIT 4: Genetics  LECTURE AND DISCUSSION MATERIAL ·  The Chromosomal Basis of Inheritance……………………………...  15 ·  The Molecular Basis of Inheritance…………………………………..  16 ·  From Gene to Protein………………………………………………...  17 ·  Microbial Models: The Genetics and Bacteria………………………..  18 ·  The Organization and Control of Eukaryotic Genomes………………  19 ·  DNA Technology and Genomics……………………………………..  20 ·  The Genetic Basis of Development…………………………………..  21  LABORATORIES AND ACTIVITIES  ­ AP Lab 7:  Genetics of Organisms – Fruit Fly Lab  ­Genetics of Parenthood Lab – Uses probability and inheritance to create  “children”.  Parents then draw a portrait of their imaginary “child”.  ­ AP Lab 6: DNA Technology and Molecular Biology  o  Gel Electrophoresis and Crime Scene Analysis (as directed by our guest  speaker, Dr. Hampikian)  o  Bacterial Transformation using ampicillian­resistance lab from Bio­Rad  o  WebQuest on stem cells, cloning, genetic engineering, genetic diseases  and DNA fingerprinting  o  DNA Fingerprinting and Crime Scene Analysis with guest speaker, Dr.  Hampikian from Boise State University – Shows students how forensics  crime scene evidence can be used to free of convict suspects.  ­Genetic Disorder Research Project and Presentation  ­DNA Dance – Students become nucleotides and see how DNA and RNA are  created  ­Campbell Biology Labs – Online reviews for DNA replication and protein  synthesis  UNIT 5: Mechanisms of Evolution  Chapters  LECTURE AND DISCUSSION MATERIAL ·  Descent with Modification:  A Darwinian View of Life………………  22 ·  The Evolution of Populations…………………………………………  23 ·  The Origin of Species…………………………………………………  24 ·  Phylogeny and Systematics……………………………………………  25 5 
  6. ·  Early Earth and the Origin of Life…………………………………….  26  LABORATORIES AND ACTIVITIES  ­AP Lab 8:  Population Genetics and Evolution  ­Population Genetics and Evolution  ­Natural Selection and Coevolution Lab – BSU General Biology Manual, Lab 17  ­Human Evolution – BSU General Biology I , Lab 14  UNIT 6: Prokaryotes, Protists and Fungi  LECTURE AND DISCUSSION MATERIAL ·  Prions and Viruses…………………………………………………….  18 ·  Prokaryotes and the Origins of Metabolic Diversity…………………..  27 ·  The Origins of Eukaryotic Diversity…………………………………..  28 ·  Fungi…………………………………………………………………..  31  LABORATORIES AND ACTIVITIES  ­Microscope Observation Labs  o  Bacteria such as anthrax, Salmonella, E. coli, tetanus and  differentiating between the three different morphologies  o  Protists such as pond water samples, Ameoba, Euglena,  Paramesium, Trypanosoma, Giardia, Chlamydomonas, Volvox,  Dictostylium  ­Grow your OWN bacteria and Fungi, modified from BSU Microbiology Lab  Manual  SCIENCE EXPO PRESENTATION  ­Students may choose their best work to present at the school­wide science expo  in December.  Many chose their genetic disease poster, other chose microscopy.  **********END OF FIRST SEMESTER***********  SECOND SEMESTER  UNIT 7: Animal Phylogeny  Chapters  LECTURE AND DISCUSSION MATERIAL ·  Introduction to Animal Evolution……………………………………..  32 ·  Invertebrates…………………………………………………………...  33 ·  Vertebrate Evolution and Diversity……………………………………  34 6
  7. LABORATORIES AND ACTIVITIES  ­Animal Phylum Research Project – Students research the symmetry, germ layers,  segmentation, type of gut, coelomic condition, common examples and habitat of  an organism from different phyla.  Students then share the information to create a  complete phylogenic map of Kingdom Animalia.  ­Hydra viewing and feeding of Daphnia; microscope lab on pathogenic  Platyhelminthes and Nematodes  ­Chordate Evolution Research and Discussion  ­Various dissections including earthworm, squid, crayfish, clam, fish, rat pigeon,  and pig; I provide modified dissection guides for each dissection.  UNIT 8: Animal Form and Function  LECTURE AND DISCUSSION MATERIAL ·  An Introduction to Animal Structure and Function……………  40 ·  Animal Nutrition……………………………………………….  41 ·  Circulation and Gas Exchange…………………………………  42 ·  The Body’s Defenses…………………………………………..  43 ·  Regulating the Internal Environment…………………………..  44 ·  Chemical Signals in Animals…………………………………...  45 ·  Nervous Systems……………………………………………….  48 ·  Sensory and Motor Mechanisms……………………………….  49 ·  Animal Reproduction/Animal Development  (Assignment to be done over Spring Break)………...  46,47 ·  Behavioral Biology……………………………………………..  51  LABORATORIES AND ACTIVITIES  ­ AP Lab 10: Physiology of the Circulatory System  ­Heart Dissection – teacher­generated handout provided  ­Eye dissection – teacher­generated handout provided  ­Vertebrate Histology Microscope Lab – BSU General Biology I, Lab 4  ­Embryonic Development Labs:  Sea star, frog, chicken  ­Urine Analysis Lab  ­AP Labs 11: Behavior ­ Habitat Selection  UNIT 9: Plants  LECTURE AND DISCUSSION MATERIAL ·  Plant Diversity I:  How Plants Colonized Land……………………….  29 ·  Plant Diversity II:  The Evolution of Seed Plants……………………..  30 ·  Plant Structure and Growth……………………………………………  35 ·  Transport in Plants…………………………………………………….  36 ·  Plant Nutrition…………………………………………………………  37 ·  Plant Reproduction and Biotechnology……………………………….  38 ·  Plant Responses to Internal and External Signals……………………..  39 7 
  8. LABORATORIES AND ACTIVITIES  ­Plant Tissues Microscope Lab – BSU General Biology I, Lab 4  ­Flower Dissection and Oral Presentation  ­Plant Project at the Idaho Botanical Gardens – Students take a field trip to the  Idaho Botanical Gardens to take digital photos.  Pictures are then put into a  specific PowerPoint format, labeled and defined.  The finished project is graded  by peers and the instructor.  ­Fruit Day – Students bring in their favorite fruit to share with the rest of the class  while we work on our Plant Projects.  ­AP Lab 9:  Transpiration  UNIT 10: Ecology  LECTURE AND DISCUSSION MATERIAL ·  Introduction to Ecology and the Biosphere…………………….  50 ·  Ecosystems……………………………………………………..  54 ·  Community Ecology……………………………………………  53 ·  Population Ecology…………………………………………….  52 ·  Conservation Biology…………………………………………..  55  LABORATORIES AND ACTIVITIES  ­Biomes Research Project  ­Community Ecology Bird Survey Lab – Using the Shannon­Weiner Index to  calculate community diversity  ­Sagebrush Population Dispersion Lab – Mapping various sections of sagebrush  to determine the population dispersion then finding research to support or refute  their hypothesis.  ­Life Tables and Survivorship Curves Cemetery Lab – Collecting over 1000  cemetery data points so we can create life tables and survivorship curves  ­Forest Ecology Pine Tree Survey Lab – Using clinometers to determine the  height of a stand of trees.  We then map diameter at breast height by height.  Students have to generate and research a hypothesis and how to determine the age  of a tree without cutting it down.  ­AP Lab 12: Dissolved Oxygen and Aquatic Primary Productivity  ­Global Warming Discussion  **NOTE: Students receive a detailed outline of each unit when we enter into a new  unit, including specific exam and lab dates.  TEACHING STRATEGIES  I have written numerous detailed outlines which students receive at the beginning of  every unit.  These outlines contain lecture material, additional questions, book readings,  mini­research topics and labs.  Students are expected to complete the packet, some during  class and some outside of class.  We have bi­weekly discussion to clarify questions that  may have come up during their reading and to discuss lab conclusions.  My lectures are 8 
  9. supplemented with a PowerPoint handout.  All assignments are posted to my website so  students can access that material ahead of time or if they are absent.  I also use a variety of resources to enrich the curriculum beyond just the textbooks and  the lab manuals.  I use computer simulations and activities, DVD and internet clips,  primary research articles, current events sharing and guest speakers.  I also have students  go on numerous field trips to do sampling outside of the classroom.  Field trips include  St. Luke’s Regional medical Center, Micron Technology, Boise State University, the  Idaho Botanical Gardens, Environmental Learning Center, Indian Creek and Hubbard  reservoir, and various cemeteries located throughout the valley.  These trips allow  students to interact with “real” scientists and see the opportunities that exist in science.  It  also allows students to collect and then analyze real­world data.  TUTORIALS  Mandatory tutorials are held 3 times a week for 30 minutes after school.  This additional  time allows us to enrich our curriculum without sacrificing lab time to accomplish all the  material.   Tutorial topics include plants hormones and photoperiods, comparative plant  reproduction, animal evolution and muscle anatomy and physiology.  STUDENT EVALUATION:  Students are evaluated in a number of different aspects.  There are independent projects  as well as group activities.  Students need to learn how to collaborate and that science is  not a solitary process.  Students also learn to develop their analytic and scientific reason  skills as they work though societal issues such as genetic engineering, stem cells, and  cloning.  Students also need to be able to present their research and/or point of view in  writing as well as during discussion and presentations.  All of these factor into the final  evaluation.  ­Grades are based on the following scale: ·  Homework/In­Class Assignments = 15% ·  Quizzes = 15% ·  Free Response = 10% ·  Labs/Projects = 30% ·  Exams = 30%  o  Unit Exams = 20%  o  Final Exam = 10%  ­Grading Scale:  A =  90%+  B =  80%+  C = 70%+  D = 60%+  F = Below 60%  Major exams are given at the end of each unit.  Unit exams will consist of a multiple­  choice section and a free response section.  Other unit exams are lab practicals related to  microscope identification and/or dissections.  Quizzes will be given periodically as a way  to test students’ knowledge prior to a major exam and will consist of multiple choice,  short answer and/or fill­in­the­blank questions. 9 

×