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  • 1. 150 Animal Physiology 199. Special Study for Advanced Undergraduates (1-5) Animal Science Affiliated Faculty Steven L. Berry, D.V.M., Specialist in Cooperative Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading Extension and Lecturer only.) (College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences) Francine A. Bradley, Ph.D., Specialist in Graduate Courses Anita M. Oberbauer Ph.D., Chairperson of the Cooperative Extension and Lecturer Department Fred S. Conte, Ph.D., Specialist in Cooperative 204. Theory of Quantitative Genetics (3) Extension and Lecturer Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 107 or the Department Office. 2223 Meyer Hall Elizabeth A. Maga, Ph.D., Associate Researcher equivalent. Theoretical basis of quantitative genetics (530) 752-1250; and Lecturer and the consequences of Mendelian inheritance. http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/ Bernard P. May, Ph.D., Adjunct Professor Concepts used to estimate quantitative genetic differ- Deanne Meyer, Ph.D., Specialist in Cooperative Undergraduate Advising. 1202 Meyer Hall ences and basis for partitioning the phenotypic vari- Extension and Lecturer (530) 754-7915; http://asac.ucdavis.edu ance. Offered in alternate years.—III. Kenji Murata, Ph.D., Assistant Researcher 206. Advanced Domestic Animal Breeding Master Adviser. E.J. DePeters James W. Oltjen, Ph.D., Specialist in Cooperative (3) Advising Center for the major, minors and course Extension and Lecturer Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 107 and Ani- offerings (including peer advising) is located in the Peter H. Robinson, Ph.D., Specialist in Cooperative mal Science 205; course 204 recommended. Proce- Animal Science Advising Center in 1202 Meyer Hall Extension and Lecturer dures for the genetic evaluation of individuals to (530) 754-7915. Each student will be assigned a Alison L. Van Eenennaam, Ph.D., Specialist in include selection indices and mixed model evalua- faculty adviser through this office upon entering the Cooperative Extension and Lecturer tion for single and multiple traits. Methods of estimat- major. Dana B. Van Liew, M.Ed., Lecturer, Academic ing genetic trends. Offered in alternate years.—III. Graduate Advising. 1202 Meyer Hall Federation Excellence in Teaching Award Famula (530) 752-2382; Gideon Zeidler, Ph.D., Associate Specialist in 208. Estimation of Genetic Parameters (3) http://animalscience.ucdavis.edu/ Cooperative Extension Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 107 and Ani- Bodega Marine Laboratory The Major Program mal Science 205; courses 204 and 108 recom- P.O. Box 247, Bodega Bay, CA (707) 875-2211 mended. General methods for the estimation of The Animal Science major is devoted to the sciences http://www-bml.ucdavis.edu/ components of variance and covariance and their central to understanding biological function of application to the estimation of heritability, repeat- Faculty domestic and captive animals, their care, manage- ability and genetic correlations are considered. Spe- ment, and utilization by people for food, fiber, com- Thomas E. Adams, Ph.D., Professor, cific emphasis is given to procedures applicable to panionship and recreation. Advances in science and Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award livestock populations under selection. technology, and an ever-growing human population, Trish J. Berger, Ph.D., Professor have increased the complexity of issues surrounding 211. Genetic Engineering of Animals (2) C. Christopher Calvert, Ph.D., Professor, the care and management of animals. Specializa- Lecture—1 hour; lecture/discussion—1 hour. Review Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award tions within the major allow students to develop a of techniques for the genetic engineering of animals Ernest S. Chang, Ph.D., Professor scientific appreciation of animals and their relation- and their limitations and applications. Student-led (Biological Sciences, Bodega Marine Laboratory) ship to their environment. Graduates in Animal Sci- discussions of recent papers in the field and possible Mary E. Delany, Ph.D., Professor and Associate ence are able to advance the science and future applications of genetically engineered ani- Dean in CA&ES technology of animal care and management in an mals in basic research and applied agricultural and Edward J. DePeters, Ph.D., Professor, objective and effective manner for the betterment of medical research. Offered in alternate years. (S/U Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award, animals and society. grading only.)—(III.) Murray UC Davis Prize for Undergraduate Teaching and Scholarly Achievement The Program. The curriculum provides depth in 212. Sequence Analysis in Molecular Serge I. Doroshov, Ph.D., Professor the biological and physiological sciences and allows Genetics (2) John M. Eadie, Ph.D., Professor students to specialize within the broad field of Lecture/laboratory—2 hours. Prerequisite: Biologi- applied animal science. Study begins with introduc- James G. Fadel, Ph.D., Professor cal Sciences 101 or the equivalent; graduate stand- tory courses in animal science, biology, chemistry, Thomas R. Famula, Ph.D., Professor, ing or consent of instructor. Use of computer mathematics, and statistics. Students undertake Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award algorithms and online databases to analyze nucleic advanced courses in animal behavior, biochemistry, Russell C. Hovey, Ph.D., Associate Professor acid and protein sequences in molecular genetics genetics, nutrition, and physiology and the integra- Silas S. O. Hung, Ph.D., Professor research. Offered in alternate years.—II. Medrano tion of these sciences to animal function, growth, Ermias Kebreab, Ph.D., Professor 298. Group Study (1-5) Annie J. King, Ph.D., Professor reproduction, and lactation. Students complete the Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Lectures and dis- Kirk C. Klasing, Ph.D., Professor curriculum by choosing a specialization in either an cussions of advanced topics in animal genetics. (S/ Dietmar Kueltz, Ph.D., Professor animal science discipline (behavior, biochemistry, U grading only.) Juan F. Medrano, Ph.D., Professor genetics, nutrition, or physiology) or in the sciences 299. Research in Animal Genetics (1-12) Joy A. Mench, Ph.D., Professor particular to a class of animals (aquatic, avian, com- Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (S/U grading James R. Millam, Ph.D., Professor panion, captive, equine, laboratory, livestock, dairy, only.) Frank M. Mitloehner, Ph.D., Associate Professor and or poultry). Associate Specialist in Cooperative Extension Career Alternatives. A wide range of career James D. Murray, Ph.D., Professor opportunities are available to graduates. The pri- Anita M. Oberbauer, Ph.D., Professor, mary goal of the major is to prepare students for Animal Physiology Academic Senate Distinguished Teaching Award Kathryn Radke, Ph.D., Professor graduate study leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees; for continued study in a professional school Janet F. Roser, Ph.D., Professor such as veterinary medicine, human medicine or See Animal Biology, on page 148; Pablo J. Ross, Ph.D., Assistant Professor dentistry; for careers in research, agricultural pro- Roberto D. Sainz, Ph.D., Professor duction, farm and ranch management, or positions Animal Science, on page 150; Cassandra B. Tucker, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in business, sales, financial services, health care, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Barry W. Wilson, Ph.D., Professor agricultural extension, consulting services, teaching, Behavior, on page 431; Philosophy, Richard A. Zinn, Ph.D., Professor journalism, or laboratory technology. on page 446; and Molecular, Emeriti Faculty B.S. Major Requirements: Cellular, and Integrative Physiology Ursula K. Abbott, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus UNITS (A Graduate Group), on page 420. Hans Abplanalp, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus Preparatory Subject Matter.............. 56-61 Gary B. Anderson, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Distinguished Teaching Award- Animal Science 1, 2, 41, 41L ............... 12 Graduate/Professional, UC Davis Prize for Biological Sciences 1A, 1B, 1C or Undergraduate Teaching and Scholarly 2A, 2B, 2C ......................................... 14 Achievement Chemistry 2A, 2B and 8A, 8B or C. Robert Ashmore, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus 118A, 118B ...................................16-18 Wallis H. Clark, Jr., Ph.D., Professor Emeritus Plant Sciences 21 or Engineering Douglas E. Conklin, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus Computer Science 15...........................3-4 Graham A. E. Gall, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus Mathematics 16A, 16B or 17A, 17B or 21A, William N. Garrett, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus 21B....................................................6-8 Yu-Bang Lee, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus Plant Sciences 120 or Statistics 100......... 4 Edward O. Price, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus Note: Some professional and graduate Robert W. Touchberry, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus schools may require additional preparatory Wesley W. Weathers, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience
  • 2. Animal Science 151 subject matter. Please consult the advising Livestock and Dairy .............................. 20 Select additional units to complete the 20-unit center. Select two of Animal Science 143, 144, 146; total from upper division Animal Science Depth Subject Matter ....................... 38-42 Animal Science 145 or 147; Nutrition 115. courses, Animal Genetics courses, Select additional upper division units from Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior Biology: Biological Sciences 101; Animal any Animal Genetics, Animal Science or 121, 121L, Nutrition 115, 122, 123, 123L. Genetics 107; Animal Biology 102, 103; Avian Sciences course, or from Nutrition 122, Variable unit courses (92, 99, 192, 197T, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 123, 123L or other courses approved by your 198, 199) are not allowed for the completion 101.................................................... 24 faculty adviser. of this requirement. Integrative Animal Biology: Animal Science 123, 124, and Neurobiology, Physiology, Poultry ................................................. 20 Animal Science—Equine ........................21 and Behavior 121 and 121L ................. 13 Avian Sciences 11, 100, 150; Animal Animal Science 15 .................................3 Laboratory; Select one from the following: Science 143; Avian Sciences 149 or Food Animal Science 103 or 104 ................. 3-4 Animal Genetics 111; Animal Science 106 or Science and Technology 121; Nutrition 123, Animal Science 115, 141 .......................8 136 and 137; Microbiology 102L; Molecular 123L. Animal Science 125 or 126 ....................3 and Cellular Biology 120L or 160L; Select additional upper division units from One additional upper division course..... 2-3 Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior any Animal Genetics, Animal Science, Avian Select from upper division Animal Science 101L or 104L; Pathology, Microbiology, and Sciences, or other courses approved by your courses, Animal Genetics courses, Immunology 126L ............................... 2-6 faculty adviser. Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior Area of Specialization...................... 20-23 Students in this specialization must substitute 121, 121L, Nutrition 115, 122, 123, 123L. Avian Sciences 103, 121, and Variable unit courses (92, 99, 192, 197T, Choose one area of specialization below; the pro- 198, 199) are not allowed for the completion gram of study must be approved in advance by your Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 117 for the Animal Science 124 and of this requirement. faculty adviser. Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 121 Minor Adviser. E.J. DePeters Animal Science with a Disciplinary and 121L requirement under Integrative Focus.................................................... 20 Graduate Study. The Animal Biology Graduate Animal Biology. Group offers a program of study and research lead- Select 20 upper division units, with approval Total Units for the Major .............. 114-126 ing to the M.S. or Ph.D, degree in Animal Biology. from your faculty adviser, to form a coherent The chair of the Animal Biology Graduate Group is series of courses in one of the following Minor Program Requirements: T. Berger disciplines: animal behavior, biochemistry, The Department of Animal Science offers five minor genetics, nutrition, or physiology. programs open to students majoring in other disci- Graduate Advisers. S.S.O. Hung, and E.A. Aquatic Animals ................................... 20 plines who wish to complement their study programs Maga with a minor in Animal Science. Some courses have Animal Science 18 and 131; Nutrition 124; required prerequisites not included as part of the Courses in Animal Science (ANS) and Animal Science 118 or 119. Select additional units from any Animal minor, and students should plan accordingly. Lower Division Courses Genetics or Animal Science course, or other UNITS 1. Domestic Animals and People (4) courses approved by your faculty adviser. Animal Science—Animal Biology ........... 20 Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Animal Students in this specialization must take Animal Science 15, 42, 41 and 41L, or 41 domestication and factors affecting their characteris- Animal Science 136 and 137 to meet their and 21 ...............................................3-4 tics and distribution. Animal use for food, fiber, Laboratory Depth Subject Matter requirement. Animal Science 103 or 104..................3-4 work, drugs, research and recreation; present and Students in this specialization may elect to Animal Science 123, 124, or Neurobiology, future roles in society. Laboratory exercises with beef substitute any of Biological Sciences 104, Physiology, and Behavior 121 and and dairy cattle, poultry, sheep, swine, laboratory Evolution and Ecology 112, or Wildlife, Fish, 121L .................................................... 4 animals, fish, horses, meat and dairy products. GE and Conservation Biology 120 and 121 for Additional upper division courses ........8-10 credit: SciEng, Wrt.—I. (I.) Famula the 12-unit requirement under Integrative Select additional units to complete the 20-unit 2. Introductory Animal Science (4) Animal Biology, with approval of your faculty total from upper division Animal Science adviser. Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: courses, Animal Genetics courses, course 1 and Biological Sciences 1A recommended. Avian Sciences ...................................... 20 Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior Growth, reproduction, lactation, inheritance, nutri- Avian Sciences 13, 100, 150; Nutrition 123, 121, 121L, Nutrition 115, 122, 123, 123L. tion, and disease control in domesticated animals 123L. Variable unit courses (92, 99, 192, 197T, and species used in aquaculture; the application of Select additional upper division units from 198, 199) are not allowed for the completion sciences to animal production. GE credit: SciEng, any Animal Genetics, Animal Science, or of this requirement. Wrt.—III. (III.) Murray Avian Sciences courses or other courses Animal Science—Animal Genetics .......... 20 15. Introductory Horse Husbandry (3) approved by your adviser. Animal Science 15, 42, 41 and 41L, or 41 Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 2 recom- Students in this specialization must substitute and 21 ...............................................3-4 mended. Introduction to care and use of light horses Avian Sciences 103, 121, and Animal Genetics 107, 111 ..................... 9 emphasizing the basic principles for selection of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 117 Additional upper division courses ..........7-8 horses, responsibilities of ownership, recreational for the Animal Science 124 and Select additional units to complete the 20-unit use and raising of foals.—II. (II.) Roser Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 121 total from upper division Animal Science and 121L requirement under Integrative 18. Introductory Aquaculture (4) courses, Animal Genetics courses, Avian Animal Biology. Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Historical and Science 103, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Companion and Captive Animals .......... 20 contemporary aquacultural practices. Interaction Behavior 121, 121L, Nutrition 115, 122, between the aqueous culture environment and the Animal Science 42, 142; Nutrition 122 or 123, 123L. Variable unit courses (92, 99, biology of aquatic animals. Impact of economics 123 and 123L; Animal Science 170. 192, 197T, 198, 199) are not allowed for and governmental policies on the development of Select additional units from any Animal the completion of this requirement. aquaculture. Interaction of aquacultural practices Genetics, Animal Science or Avian Sciences Animal Science—Aquaculture ................ 20 with larger societal goals. GE credit: SciEng.—I. (I.) course, or from Nutrition 115, 122, 123, Animal Science 18................................. 4 Kueltz 123L or other courses approved by your Animal Science 118, 119....................... 8 faculty adviser. 21. Livestock and Dairy Cattle Judging (2) Additional upper division courses ............ 8 Laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: course 1 or 2 rec- Equine Science ...................................... 20 Select additional units to complete the 20-unit ommended. Evaluation of type as presently applied Animal Science 15, 115, 141 and one of total from upper division Animal Science to light horses, meat animals and dairy cattle. Rela- Animal Science 125, 126 or 127. courses, Animal Genetics courses, Applied tionship between form and function, form and car- Select additional units from any Animal Biological Systems Technology 161, Nutrition cass quality, and form and milk production.—III. (III.) Genetics or Animal Science course, or from 124, Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Van Liew Nutrition 115, 122, 123, 123L or other Biology 121. Variable unit courses (92, 99, 192, 197T, 198, 199) are not allowed for 22A. Animal Evaluation (2) courses approved by your faculty adviser. the completion of this requirement. Laboratory—3 hours; fieldwork—30 hours (total). Laboratory Animals.............................. 23 Prerequisite: course 21 or the equivalent. Atten- Animal Science 42, 103, 140, Nutrition Animal Science—Dairy/Livestock........... 20 dance at 3 one-day weekend field trips required. 123, 123L, Animal Science 104 or Animal Science 41 and 41L or 21 ........... 4 Domestic livestock species with emphasis on visual Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior Animal Science 104............................... 4 appraisal, carcass evaluation, and application of 102, and Anatomy, Physiology and Cell Additional upper division courses .......... 12 performance information. Emphasis on accurate writ- Biology 100 or Neurobiology, Physiology, Select 4 or 8 units from Animal Science 143, ten and oral descriptions of evaluations. Prerequisite and Behavior 123. 144, 146. to intercollegiate judging competition. Offered in alternate years. (P/NP grading only.)—(I.) Van Liew Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience
  • 3. 152 Animal Science 22B. Animal Evaluation (2) and social behavior. External (exogenous) and phys- development, the initiation of lactation, the composi- Laboratory—3 hours; fieldwork—30 hours (total). iological mechanisms influencing behavior will be tion of milk and lactational performance. GE credit: Prerequisite: course 22A or the equivalent. Atten- discussed. GE credit: SciEng. SciEng, Wrt.—II. (II.) Hovey dance at 3 one-day weekend field trips required. 105. Domestic Animal Behavior (2) 125. Equine Exercise Physiology (3) Continuation of course 22A with emphasis on spe- Lecture—2 hours. Prerequisite: an introductory ani- Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Neurobiology, Physi- cific species: swine, beef cattle and sheep. Applica- mal behavior course (e.g., course 104, Psychology ology, and Behavior 101. Distance learning class tion of animal science principles to selection and 150, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 102) broadcast from Cal Poly, Pomona, on basic and management problem-solving scenarios. Prerequisite or consent of instructor. Application of the principles applied physiology of the exercising horse. Includes to intercollegiate judging competition. Offered in of animal behavior in the management of domestic physiological systems, gait analysis, lameness, phar- alternate years. (P/NP grading only.)—(II.) Van Liew animals. Includes reproductive behavior, feeding macology, sports medicine; sport horse performance 41. Domestic Animal Production (2) behavior, agonistic behavior, animal handling and evaluation and conditioning. (Students and instructor Lecture—2 hours. Principles of farm animal manage- human-animal interactions. GE credit: SciEng.—II. have two-way communication capabilities.) ment, including dairy and beef cattle, sheep, and (II.) Tucker 126. Equine Nutrition (3) swine. Industry trends, care and management, nutri- 106. Domestic Animal Behavior Laboratory Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 15, Nutrition tion, and reproduction.—I. (I.) Mitloehner (2) 115. Distance learning class broadcast from Cal 41L. Domestic Animal Production Laboratory—6 hours. Prerequisite: course 104 or the Poly, Pomona and CSU Fresno on equine nutrition. Laboratory (2) equivalent. Research experience with the behavior Includes equine digestion, digestive physiology, diet Discussion—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequi- of large domestic animals. Experimental design, development and evaluation, and the relationship of site: course 41 (may be taken concurrently). Animal methods of data collection and analysis, and report- the topics to recommended feeding practices and production principles and practices, including five ing of experimental results. GE credit: SciEng, nutritional portfolios. field trips to dairy cattle, beef cattle, sheep, and Wrt.—III. (III.) Tucker 127. Advanced Equine Reproduction (3) swine operations and campus labs. (P/NP grading 115. Advanced Horse Production (4) Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: an upper division only.)—I, II. (I, II.) Mitloehner, Van Liew Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: physiology course (e.g., Neurobiology, Physiology, 42. Introductory Companion Animal course 15; Biological Sciences 101; Nutrition 115; and Behavior 101) and an advanced horse produc- Biology (4) Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 101; or tion and management course (e.g., course 115). Dis- Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Companion consent of instructor. Feeding, breeding, and man- tance learning course that provides in-depth animal domestication. Historical, contemporary per- agement of horses; application of the basic princi- knowledge of the reproductive physiology, anatomy spectives. Legislation concerning companion ani- ples of animal science to problems of production of and endocrinology of the mare and stallion. Empha- mals. Selected topics in anatomy, physiology, all types of horses. Designed for students who wish sis on structure/function relationships as they are genetics, nutrition, behavior and management. Sci- to become professionally involved in the horse indus- applied to improving equine reproductive manage- entific methods in studying the human-animal bond. try. GE credit: SciEng.—I. (I.) Roser ment and efficiency.—III. (III.) Roser Discussions: application of biological concepts to 118. Fish Production (4) 128. Agricultural Applications of Linear problems related to companion animals. GE credit: Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: Programming (4) SciEng, Wrt.—II. (II.) Oberbauer Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology 120 and Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—2 hours; discussion— 49A-J. Animal Management Practices (2) 121. Current practices in fish production; relation- 1 hour. Prerequisite: upper division standing and Discussion—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. The appli- ship between the biological aspects of a species and Agricultural Systems and Environment 21 or the cation of the principles of elementary biology to the the production systems, husbandry, management, equivalent. Applications of linear programming in management of a specific animal species. Among and marketing practices utilized. Emphasis on spe- agriculture, emphasizing resource allocation prob- the topics offered: (A) Aquaculture, (B) Beef, (C) cies currently reared in California.—II. (II.) Doroshov lems and decision making. Problems include crop Dairy, (D) Goats, (E) Horses, (F) Laboratory Animals, 119. Invertebrate Aquaculture (4) production, ration formulation, and farm manage- (G) Meats, (H) Poultry, (I) Sheep, (J) Swine. Up to Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: ment. Hands-on experience in developing linear pro- four different topics may be taken. (P/NP grading Biological Sciences 1B. Management, breeding and grams and interpreting the results.—II. (II.) Fadel only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) feeding of aquatic invertebrates; application of 129. Environmental Stewardship in Animal 90C. Research Group Conference (1) basic principles of physiology, reproduction, and Production Systems (3) Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: lower division nutrition to production of mollusks and crustaceans Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences standing, consent of instructor. Weekly conference for human food; emphasis on interaction of species 10 or 1A and 1B, Chemistry 2A, 2B, 8A, 8B. Man- on research problems, progress and techniques in biology and managerial techniques on production agement principles of environmental stewardship for the animal sciences. May be repeated for credit. (P/ efficiencies. grazing lands, animal feeding, operations and NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) 120. Principles of Meat Science (3) aquaculture operations; existing regulations, sample 92. Internship in Animal Science (1-12) Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences analyses, interpretation and utilization of data, eval- 1A. Anatomical, physiological, developmental, and uation of alternative practices, and policy develop- Internship—3-18 hours. Prerequisite: consent of biochemical aspects of muscle underlying the con- ment.—II. Meyer instructor. Internship off and on campus in dairy, live- stock, and aquaculture production, research and version of muscle to meat. Includes meat processing, 131. Reproduction and Early Development management; or in a business, industry, or agency preservation, microbiology, and public health issues in Aquatic Animals (4) associated with these or other animal enterprises. All associated with meat products. (Same course as Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: requirements of Internship Approval form must be Food Science and Technology 120.) GE credit: Sci- Molecular and Cellular Biology 150; Wildlife, Fish, met. (P/NP grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Eng. and Conservation Biology 120, 121; or consent of 98. Directed Group Study (1-5) 120L. Meat Science Laboratory (2) instructor. Physiological and developmental functions Discussion—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequi- related to reproduction, breeding efficiency and fer- Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading site: Biological Sciences 1A; course 120 (may be tility of animals commonly used in aquaculture.—III. only.) taken concurrently). Laboratory exercises and stu- (III.) Doroshov 99. Special Study for Undergraduates (1-5) dent participation in transformation of live animal to 136A. Techniques and Practices of Fish Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading Culture (2) carcass and meat, structural and biochemical only.) changes related to meat quality, chemical and sen- Lecture—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Upper Division Courses sory evaluation of meat, and field trips to packing course 2. Daily care and maintenance of fish in resi- plant and processing plant. (Same course as Food dential aquariums, research and commercial facili- 103. Animal Welfare (4) Science and Technology 120L.) ties. Biological and environmental factors important Lecture—2 hours; discussion—2 hours. Prerequisite: to sound management of fish. Laboratories focus on course 104 or Neurobiology, Physiology, and 123. Animal Growth and Development (4) Lecture—3 hours; lecture/discussion—1 hour. Pre- fish culture and include growth trials. Not open for Behavior 102 or the equivalent or consent of instruc- credit to students who have completed course tor. The application of principles of animal behavior requisite: Animal Biology 103 or Biological Sciences 103. Growth and development of animals from con- 136.—I. (I.) Hung and physiology to assessment and improvement of the welfare of wild, captive, and domestic animals. ception to maturity, viewed from practical and bio- 136B. Techniques and Practices of Avian Topics include animal pain, stress, cognition, motiva- logical perspectives; includes genetic, metabolic, Culture (2) tion, emotions, and preferences, as well as environ- nutritional control of cell and organism function. GE Lecture—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: mental enrichment methods.—I. (I.) Mench credit: SciEng.—III. (III.) Sainz course 2. Daily care and maintenance of birds for 124. Lactation (4) research, commercial production, and companion or 104. Principles of Domestic Animal Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: hobby uses. Biological and environmental factors Behavior (3) Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 101; Ani- important to sound management of birds. Laborato- Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: Biological Sciences ries focus on bird husbandry, management and 1A or 1B or the equivalent. Basic principles of ani- mal Biology 103 (may be taken concurrently); or the equivalent background knowledge. Consideration of care, and include growth trials.—III. (III.) Hung mal behavior as applied to domesticated species. Emphasis will be placed on behavioral development the biochemical, genetic, physiological, nutritional, and structural factors relating to mammary gland Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience
  • 4. Animal Science 153 137. Animal Biochemistry Laboratory (2) 147. Dairy Processing and Marketing (3) (chosen from faculty-suggested or approved propos- Lecture—1 hour; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: als) during the academic year under the guidance of Animal Biology 102 or Biological Sciences 102 or course 146 or consent of instructor. Examination of a faculty member. Upon completion, student will the equivalent. Chemical and biochemical methods, distribution systems, processing practices, product write a thesis and present a public seminar describ- and instruments commonly used in animal science. quality, impact of government policy (domestic and ing his/her research. (Deferred grading only, pend- Wet chemical methods, UV/visible and atomic foreign), marketing alternatives, and product devel- ing completion of sequence.) absorption spectrophotometry, thin-layer and gas-liq- opment. 197T. Tutoring in Animal Science (1-2) uid chromatography, commercial chemical kits. 148. Enterprise Analysis in Animal Tutorial—1-2 hours. Prerequisite: Animal Science or Attention to safety.—I. (I.) Hung Industries (4) related major, advanced standing, consent of instruc- 140. Management of Laboratory Animals Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course tor. Tutoring of students in lower division animal sci- (4) 141 or 145 or 147 or consent of instructor. Exami- ence courses; weekly conference with instructors in Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: nation and application of decision making and prob- charge of courses; written critiques of teaching pro- Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 101. Labo- lem solving in the production enterprise. The areas cedures. May be repeated one time for credit. (P/ ratory animal management procedures in view of of production analysis, problem solving, risk analysis NP grading only.) animal physiology, health and welfare, government and cost-benefit analysis will be examined in terms 198. Directed Group Study (1-5) regulations, and experimental needs. Clinical tech- of the total enterprise. GE credit: SocSci, Wrt.—III. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading niques using rodents and rabbits as models.—I. (I.) (III.) only.) 141. Equine Enterprise Management (4) 149. Farrier Science (3) 199. Special Study for Advanced Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: course Lecture—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 115. Distance Undergraduates (1-5) 115; Economics 1A, 1B recommended. Examination learning class broadcast from California Polytechnic Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (P/NP grading of the concepts and principles involved in the opera- State University San Luis Obispo, California Poly- only.) tion of an equine enterprise. Essential aspects of technic State University Pomona, and California equine enterprise management, including equine State University Fresno. In-depth examination of the Graduate Courses law, marketing, cash flow analysis, and impact of structure-function relationship of the equine hoof and 200. Strategies in Animal Production (4) state and federal regulations. GE credit: SocSci, how it relates to conformation, injury, and perfor- Lecture/discussion—4 hours. Prerequisite: consent of Wrt.—II. mance.—III. (III.) instructor. Examines the forces and issues in animal 142. Companion Animal Care and 149L. Farrier Science Laboratory (1) agriculture through the strategic management pro- Management (4) Laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: course 149 (may cess. Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor. The 206. Models in Agriculture and Nutrition course 42, Biological Sciences 101, Neurobiology, art and science of horseshoeing in equine related (3) Physiology, and Behavior 101; Animal Biology 102 fields. Proper use of the tools, materials and tech- Lecture—2 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: and 103 recommended. Management and produc- niques in the fabrication of shoes and safe prepara- Mathematics 16B; Statistics 108. Basic model build- tion of companion animals. Integration of the disci- tion of the hoof for application of shoes. (P/NP ing principles and techniques for statistical and sys- plinary principles of behavior, genetics, nutrition, grading only.)—III. (III.) tems simulation models. Optimization techniques for and physiology as related to the care of companion 170. Ethics of Animal Use (4) non-linear experimental designs and management animals.—I. (I.) Oberbauer Lecture—3 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: models are presented. Quantitative analysis and 143. Pig and Poultry Care and any basic course in composition or speech. Ethical evaluation of linear and non-linear equations used in Management (4) issues relating to animal use in contemporary soci- agriculture and nutrition. Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours; Saturday ety. Integration of philosophical theories with scien- 259. Literature in Animal Science (1) field trips. Prerequisite: Nutrition 115, Neurobiol- tific evidence relating to animal behavior, mentality, Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing. ogy, Physiology, and Behavior 101. Care and man- and welfare. Uses of animals in agriculture, Critical presentation and analysis of recent journal agement of swine, broilers and turkeys as related to research, and as companions. Ethical responsibili- articles in animal science. May be repeated for environmental physiology, nutrition and metabolism, ties regarding wildlife and the environment. GE credit up to nine times. (S/U grading only.) disease management and reproduction. Offered in credit: SocSci, Wrt.—III. (III.) Mench alternate years.—(I.) King 290. Seminar (1) 190C. Research Group Conference (1) Seminar—1 hour. Reports and discussions of topics 144. Beef Cattle and Sheep Production (4) Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: advanced stand- of interest in genetics, nutrition, and physiology as Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours; one or two ing; consent of instructor. Weekly conference on they apply to animal science. (S/U grading only.)— Saturday field trips. Prerequisite: course 41, Animal research problems, progress and techniques in the I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Genetics 107, Nutrition 115, or consent of instruc- animal sciences. May be repeated for credit. (P/NP tor; a course in Range Science and a course in grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) 290C. Research Group Conference (1) microcomputing are recommended. Genetics, physi- Discussion—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing. 192. Internship in Animal Science (1-12) ology, nutrition, economics and business in beef cat- Weekly conference on research problems, progress Internship—3-36 hours. Prerequisite: completion of and techniques in the animal sciences. May be tle and sheep production. Resources used, species 84 units and consent of instructor. Internship off and differences, range and feedlot operations. Emphasis repeated for credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, on campus in dairy, livestock and aquaculture pro- II, III.) on integration and information needed in methods duction, research and management; or in a busi- for management of livestock enterprises.—III. (III.) ness, industry, or agency associated with these or 291. Current Research in Animal Science (1) Sainz other animal enterprises. All requirements of Intern- Seminar—1 hour. Prerequisite: graduate standing. 145. Meat Processing and Marketing (4) ship Approval Form must be met. (P/NP grading Current research in animal science explored at Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours. Prerequisite: only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) weekly seminars presented by guest lecturers. Dis- course 143 or 144 or consent of instructor. Distribu- cussion of research presented. May be repeated for 194. Research in Animal Science (3) tion, processing and marketing of meat and meat credit. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) Laboratory—6 hours; discussion—1 hour. Prerequi- products. Meat and meat animal grading and pric- site: upper division standing, course 193, one labo- 297. Supervised Teaching in Animal Science ing. Government regulations and social/consumer ratory course in animal biology and consent of (2) concerns. Future trends and impact on production instructor. Research with a faculty mentor. Weekly Supervised teaching—6 hours. Prerequisite: consent management practices. Includes poultry.—(II.) discussion and laboratory on specific research topic. of instructor. Practical experience in teaching Animal 146. Dairy Cattle Production (4) May include a seminar to research group. Choose Science at the University level; curriculum design Lecture—3 hours; laboratory—3 hours; one manda- from sections: (1) Animal Behavior; (2) Animal and evaluation; preparation and presentation of tory Saturday field trip. Prerequisite: course 124, Genetics; (3) Animal Nutrition; (4) Animal Physiol- material. Assistance in laboratories, discussion sec- Animal Genetics 107, and Nutrition 115, or consent ogy. May be repeated for credit for a total of four tions, and evaluation of student work. An evaluation of instructor. Scientific principles from genetics, nutri- times.—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) letter sent to the Graduate Adviser with a copy to the tion, physiology, and related fields applied to con- student. (S/U grading only.)—I, II, III. (I, II, III.) 194HA-194HB-194HC. Undergraduate version of animal feed to human food through dairy Honors Thesis in Animal Science (4-4-4) 298. Group Study (1-5) animals. Management and economic decisions are Lecture—1 hour; laboratory—9 hours. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Sect. 1, 2, 3—let- related to animal biology considering the environ- Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior 101, Ani- ter grading; from Sect. 4 on—S/U grading only.) ment and animal well-being. GE credit: SciEng, mal Biology 103; minimum cumulative GPA of 299. Research (1-12) Wrt.—III. (III.) DePeters 3.200 and selection by the Honors Selection Com- (S/U grading only.) mittee. Students will carry out a research project Quarter Offered: I=Fall, II=Winter, III=Spring, IV=Summer; 2011-2012 offering in parentheses General Education (GE) credit: ArtHum=Arts and Humanities; SciEng=Science and Engineering; SocSci=Social Sciences; Div=Social-Cultural Diversity; Wrt=Writing Experience