The Stories We Can Tell:
Ebook Usage in Academic Libraries
Pamela Jacobs / Information Resources Librarian / University of...
We’re from the north
Our ebook acquisitions landscape
• DDA/PDA
• E-approval plans
• Subscriptions
• Firm orders
• Consortial purchases (packag...
Evaluation
Evaluation
Usage* is a key metric for evaluating ebooks
Evaluation
Usage* is a key metric for evaluating ebooks
*Usage is just one aspect of a complete collection evaluation stra...
Evaluation
Usage* is a key metric for evaluating ebooks
*Usage is just one aspect of a complete collection evaluation stra...
What constitutes a use?
Report Metric
COUNTER BR2 Sections viewed, printed or
downloaded
COUNTER BR1 Usage by title
COUNTE...
Aims:
• Collective purchasing
• Shared digital information
infrastructure
• Collaborative assessment
In-house developed discovery and access platform
• Publisher packages
• Guided by member committee
• Model license
• local...
Opportunities:
• preservation and perpetual access
• access to logs and reliable usage data
• comparison and benchmarking
Opportunities:
• preservation and perpetual access
• access to logs and reliable usage data
• comparison and benchmarking
...
High quality collection, includes course adoption titles
Local loading, perpetual access and exclusive platform
15 univers...
Mixed (DRM) bag
Figure credit: OCUL office report Nov. 20, 2013
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200
Athabasca University Press
CPR...
Findings
For MUPO titles, users read an average of 4 pages in each title
For SUPO titles, 12% of visitors end up borrowing...
Usage can tell us…
• How much is the package being used
• What proportion of the package is being used
• How intensely are...
• University founded in 1964
• Ontario Agricultural College 1874
• Ontario Veterinary College 1862
• FTE 26,000
• ARL & CA...
Library core values
• Learning
• Service
• Stewardship
• Access
• Intellectual Freedom
• Innovation
• Communication
• Inte...
Context for book selection
• Institutional alignment
• Curated collection
• Shared discovery system
• Collaboration via co...
“You are not buying content … You
are buying
content, software, licenses, DRM
and an ongoing relationship with a
vendor.”
...
Ebook selection at UG
• Ebooks vs print books
• E-preferred approvals
• Packages
• Title by title selection
• Standing ord...
Ebook preferences at UG
• Purchase
• Perpetual access
• DRM free
• Multiple users
Ebooks available at UG
• Publisher direct
• Aggregators
• Specific collections
• Primary source databases
• Open access
Evaluating use
• Metrics
• Turnaways
• Overlap
• Discovery
• UX
Publisher package – front list purchase
Pros
• One invoice
• Low cost/title
• Simplified selection
• DRM free, unlimited u...
Publisher package – front list purchase
Pros
• One invoice
• Low cost/title
• Simplified selection
• DRM free, unlimited u...
Title by title selection
Pros
• Clear entitlement
• DRM free, unlimited users
• Improved discovery
• Increased usage
Title by title selection
Pros
• Clear entitlement
• DRM free, unlimited users
• Titles in catalogue sooner
• Increased usa...
Ebook preferences
• Purchase
• Perpetual access
• DRM free
• Multiple users
Ebook preferences revisited
• Purchase
• Perpetual access
• DRM free
• Multiple users
• MARC records
• Clear entitlement
•...
The long tail is slowly killing us ….
… and if we aren’t proactive in finding a solution, we could go the way of diplodocu...
The Ryerson context – we are that snowflake
Ryerson’s collection philosophy
• Use over depth and breadth
• Access over ownership
• Largely automated
History of Ryerson’s monograph acquisitions by order type
Ryerson’s approval plan is:
• Publisher neutral
• Subject driven
• E-preferred
• Platform neutral
• Lean on auto-shipments...
Benefits
Simplified record management
Enhanced duplication control
Higher quality cataloguing
Central invoicing
Item ...
We do not want to play the role of the cat who ate the canary
(no matter how handsome).
Licensed under Creative Commons: h...
By Bit Boy (Flickr: The Elephant in the Room) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Comm...
Ryerson Guelph
Aggregator 1 - non linear lending Publisher 1 - unlimited
Aggregator 1 - textbook Publisher 2 - unlimited
A...
Conclusions
The definition of success varies depending on context
One way is not necessarily better than the other, but id...
Questions?
Thank you!
Suggested readings
Blummer, B. & Kenton, J. (2012). Best practices for integrating e-books in academic libraries : a liter...
The stories we can tell ebook usage in academic libraries
The stories we can tell ebook usage in academic libraries
The stories we can tell ebook usage in academic libraries
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The stories we can tell ebook usage in academic libraries

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Presented at the Electronic Resources & Libraries conference in Austin, TX on March 18, 2014. With Jane Schmidt, Ryerson University and Klara Maidenburg, Scholars Portal.

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  • Image credit: http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/namerica/province/onzna.gifWe’ll touch on:How we anticipate user interest or demandHow we make the best with our (limited) fundsHow we evaluate ebooks post-acquisitionHow we recreate and sustain success
  • We hope to touch upon our combined experience in all of these acquisition methods and How these acquisitions have been evaluated in our libraries
  • “Past usage is not a good predictor of future usage” (Bucknell, 2010)Nevertheless, usage is the low hanging fruit…Need to consider other data ILL statsPrint counterpart usage
  • Usage is a blunt instrument Usage suggests interest, popularity, patterns of use (frequency, trend, intensity)But we still lack a metric that actually measures *READING*
  • Consortium of 21 publicly funded universities in Ontario, Canada 21 university libraries. Some research intensive and some focused on teaching and learningA mix of arge and small institutions.
  • Acquired books are locally loadedMainly packages, direct from publisherAcquisition priorities and negotiations are guided by committeeModel license in placeDRM free locally loaded titles AND DRM restricted titles600,000+ titles so far
  • Challenging to evaluate because of multiple access points and lack of uniformity between our usage stats and the vendor’s Local load – preservation and perpetual accessAccess to logs and reliable usage dataComparison and benchmarking amongst member schools Acquired books are locally loadedMainly packages, direct from publisherAcquisition priorities and negotiations are guided by committeeModel license in placeDRM free locally loaded titles AND DRM restricted titles600,000+ titles so farUnique position of having a consortial platform where books are loaded in parallel to their availability on the vendor’s native platform. Allows libraries to have a reliable point of perpetual access as well as trustworthy usage statistics and comparison and benchmarking with comparator institutions in the province that subscribe to the same content
  • Challenging to evaluate because of multiple access points and lack of uniformity between our usage stats and the vendor’sChallenges – discoverability – targets have to be enabled in the OPAC, ordering of SP target vs. vendor platform target, delay in loading of books and records
  • High quality title listOnly larger schools able to participateDeveloping more palatable offer for smaller schools
  • MUPO=multiple simultaneous users; SUPO = a single user at each institution; SUPO+ = a single user at each institution view only; OA =no access restrictionsNews release about ACUP deal: http://ocul.on.ca/node/1650The Association of Canadian University Presses / Association Des Presses UniversitairesCanadiennes exists to serve the interest of Canadian scholarship. OCUL, ACUP and eBoundhave partnered to promote and support the availability of Canadian scholarship in ebook format throughout Ontario’s universities.Over 4400 ebooks published primarily between 2007-2013The agreement provides OCUL with perpetual ownership and local hosting rights on the Scholars Portal Books platform for all of the content provided. Scholars Portal as the sole access platform
  • Success depends on the intent with which the content was purchasedConsiderations –How much of the collection is being used? Long tail of unused titles or well spread?How intensely are titles being used? Are there a few key titles driving use?Is the package more popular with some schools? Might be a better buy for some schools and not othersCost per use/cost per title – was it a good buy?At the local level, schools might do further analysis against print equivalents, against ILL stats, etc.LimitationsDepends on the discoverability of the collection in that school’s OPAC.Are the records there? Which target is first in the list?
  • Context slide about the University of GuelphCARL = Canadian Association of Research Libraries
  • http://www.lib.uoguelph.ca/about/vision_&_values.cfmStewardship: One of the core values of the Library is our ethical responsibility for stewardship. Stewardship encompasses both our responsibility for the care and preservation of knowledge and information resources entrusted to us, and its transmission to future generations. Our stewardship reflects a bond of trust between the Library and our community as well as our mutual interest in and commitment to the cultural and historical legacy of the human record.Access: Ensuring equitable access to information and services is a core value of the Library. We provide impartial and non-judgmental access to resources and services. We strive to provide services, facilities, collections and systems that are accessible to all individualsThe library is central to campus and provides a strong collection and also 93% of the study space on campus. A member of 3 library consortia – provincial, national and local. The local consortia of 3 universities has a shared storage facility, fondly titled the ANNEX.
  • Our collecting has always been closely tied to the curriculum and research needs of the university. In this we are like so many other research libraries, creating a carefully curated collection of books for our users to choose from. We share our catalogue & discovery system with two nearby universities and collection building is done with this in mind; eBooks throw a real wrench into this paradigm with respect to interlibrary loan.Library culture – in 2009 reorganized from a primarily liaison model to a team based model.Collections Team: resource selection done by team of collections librarians - values rooted strongly in creating a curated collection that aligns with the curricular and research programs of the university. Decisions about ebooks are made both at the individual librarian and team levels. Working in a small focused group is advantageous when dealing with the complex ecosystem of ebooksD&A: Works to optimize findability, accessibility, and usability of resources and seamlessly connect users with resources and services. This team is charged with continually improving the user's experience by designing and delivering dynamic user services grounded in a deep understanding of user behaviours, expectations and needs. User services include online and in-person services and point-of-need assistance. The team participates in the creation of an adaptable information network and architecture and provides tools to enable discovery and enhance user productivity.For ebooks these two teams must work together since we are no longer just buying content…http://www.lib.uoguelph.ca/about/team_based_service_model.cfm
  • - We are buying content, we are “we buying content, software, licenses, DRM and an ongoing relationship with a vendor.” – Sue Polanka (http://ebookchallenge.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Curation_ebooks_Polanka_Sept2012_for_JISC.pdf)Created an ebook Strategy Working Group …. from selection to UX
  • We select ebooks instead of print books for a variety of reasonsPackages – via consortia or on our own, frontlist or backlistE-preferred approvals – in some call number ranges onlyTitle by title selection – usually via book vendor, but sometimes publisher directStanding orders – convert to ebooksDemand driven and patron driven models – we are very interested but most of these are only available via aggregators which is not our preferred purchase model for reasons already stated.
  • Prefer purchase over subscriptions – we are still building a collectionPreference is DRM free (multiple user), perpetual access – including local load on Scholars PortalFor restricted titles, prefer multiple user access
  • Range of platforms:Publisher direct examples – Wiley, Springer, Elsevier, RSC, - this is where we purchase backlisted titlesAggregators – general, subject based, university presses – e.g. Project Muse Specialized collections – by topic or type of resourcePrimary source databases – ECCO, Alexander Street PressOpen access – including Hathi Trust, Project Gutenburg, Internet ArchiveEbooks on reserve for Fall 2013 ~250 ebooks or ebook chapters on 31 different platforms including open access ebooks on Hathi Trust, Project Gutenburg, Internet Archive & elsewhere
  • - Usage data – not all BR2 Counter reports are alike or are available – what is counted varies even within standardized Counter reports e.g. BR2; Title by title reports not always available- Monitoring turnaways – look at turnaways for user limits, but also some publishers provide for non-purchased titles – see what our users are trying to access – items in shared catalogue held by one of the other two universities; - Overlap between platforms – local load pretty much ensures this, but it also happens elsewhere- Usage can only happen if titles can be discovered – delays in access mean less (or no) usePoor MARC records can also inhibit discovery – no subject headings / no chapter titles or summariesUX study – some of our users would rather choose another book or even change their essay topic rather than jump through DRM-related hoops like having to sign in to download a book
  • Purchased front list ebooks from major publisher and blocked this publisher on approval plan. Special offer, OTO funding. Not a consortial purchase.AdvantagesOne invoice – much less time required by acquisitions staff in ordering ebooksCost effectiveness – good deal; value for moneySimplified collection – one decision buys a lot of contentPublisher platform free of Digital Rights Management restrictionsNo limit on the number of simultaneous usersLong term preservation via local loading on Scholars Portal – this is very important in terms of actually owning and hosting the content; recognize that this is usually not an option
  • What didn’t work:Collection development- turns out it doesn’t include all of the books, just the ones available on the publisher’s platform which exclude books expected to be ‘course adoption’ books; in some areas it was unclear whether or not certain books would fall into this area; figuring all this out tended to cancel out a lot of the original efficiencies for ebook selectionProblems with quality of MARC records – a lot of records so required a lot of time to fix themWorkflow – too many MARC records to handle with current staffing, access delayed by over a yearUsage data – low, due to delay in discoveryUser experience – DRM free, pdf based is what our users like
  • What we are doing differentlyNot buying the front list packageRemove publisher from blocked list in approval plan and instead set to slips (we have one big approval plan but only some call number ranges are set to e-preferred)Select as slips for access via the publisher’s platformPurchase ebook cataloguing records from book vendorWhat changed to make this possible? Can now buy titles available on publisher platform via our book vendor.Advantages are we know what we own, we still get the DRM free platform and local load but the titles are discoverable much sooner so we hope that use will increase.
  • Disadvantages:- Requires more time for selectors to choose titles and acquisitions staff to order titlesHigher cost - not only for on a cost/title basis but also we are now purchasing the records from our book vendor
  • Prefer purchase over subscriptions – we are still building a collectionPreference is DRM free (multiple user), perpetual access – including local load on Scholars PortalFor restricted titles, prefer multiple user access
  • Time lags caused by problems of entitlement confusion and poor quality MARC are unacceptable.User experience – some users would rather choose another title or even change their topic than jump through DRM-related hoopsIn both models cost sustainability is an issue, but it is easier to adjust mid-fiscal when buying title by title. Some of our preferences (good quality MARC records) are expensive – will this be sustainable for us?
  • Ryerson is opting out of ebook packages in favour DDA via aggregator on a large scale. Our budget can no longer sustain the increased costs behind ebook packages and we are weary of creating another Big Deal monster.
  • University status granted in 1993, previously a polytechnic institutionUrban commuter campus 38,950 students, including Masters, PhD and large continuing education cohortFocused on innovation and career-focused education
  • Use drives both our selection and our de-selection decisions. We are an urban campus with a finite amount of space that will not see growth and we do not have offsite storage.We emphasize access over ownership. Our polytechnic roots are likely why we approach our collection this way. Collectively, we have not attempted to provide in-depth collections in any one particular subject area for the circulating collection. Aside from a small number of areas that are notorious for copious publishing such as English, History and Philosophy, the vast majority of our collections are automated with limited firm ordering. DDA was welcomed with open arms by our liaison librarians who often had a difficult time prioritizing firm orders with limited budgets. We are driven by efficiency and take out extraneous steps where possible. For example, our DDA is unmediated and we do not reject approval books
  • This graph shows our history after having implemented approval plans when we saw a massive budget increase to support new grad programs. After 2008, our budget began to sustain year over year cuts, first controlled by swift cuts to the approval plan, followed by an increase in DDA.
  • With a couple of exceptions (e.g. EMP) we are publisher neutral – the plan is subject drivenWe are e-preferred in all areas except for Design related (Architecture, Interior Design, Fashion and Image Arts) due to ephemeral nature of contentWe have signed on with all aggregator platforms in order to be inclusive on content. Excluding content based solely on whether we had a license for a particular platform made no sense, so we took the plunge and signed with all (except publisher platforms with fees)Our auto-shipped titles are a very exclusive bunch and have steadily declined over time due to budget reductions (easily reduced target) – only those with Research Essential or Basic Essential tag, all others are slipped/moved into DDA pool.Increasingly we are moving away from firm ordering. STL threshold is low – only one STL and subsequent use triggers purchase. Ebrary is auto-purchase (SUPO) based on the assumption that in absence of demonstrated demand (i.e. a course reserve), a single user license is sufficient.
  • One source for cataloguing, able to integrate into existing workflow – one step EDI loading for bib/order/item via a load table that automatically populates the relevant fixed fields.One source for purchase means greater confidence in duplication control, particularly by opting out of front list dealsRecord quality from the large packages has been inconsistent at best. Our cataloguing department spends a tremendous amount of time enhancing them with subject analysis and LC classification. Records are also available in a dramatically shortened turnaround time.Invoices are simply incorporated into existing workflow, less staff time at all levels (i.e. having to get approvals from higher levels of admin due to large amounts)We are able to track price data at the item level to support subject analysis, whereas this is impossible with package deals
  • This graph pretty much speaks for itself. We’re looking forward to continuing our data analysis for a longitudinal study, hoping that we see more uptake of the approval and firm books, but in the short term, as long as use is our main driver in decision making, the evidence indicates that the titles we are letting our users select are getting more bang for our buck.
  • Of course, I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge that this is not all sunshine and rainbows. There are a couple of noteworthy drawbacks to mention.You may have noticed that I haven’t included much in the way of expenditure. This is not an omission. The bottom line is that as it stands, this model is unsustainable for publishers. It may seem odd for me to be playing the role of apologist, but our financial gain is the publisher’s loss to their bottom line and we need to find a way to make this model sustainable for all.Those conversations are actually taking place at this conference, so I won’t belabor the point.
  • And of course, the elephant in the room is that by choosing content via DDA, we are deliberately choosing “here today gone tomorrow” aggregator content, and saddling our users with cumbersome DRM.
  • So, to recap, Ryerson is basically taking the opposite approach to Guelph, as is starkly demonstrated by our preferred platform as our vendors see it.
  • The stories we can tell ebook usage in academic libraries

    1. 1. The Stories We Can Tell: Ebook Usage in Academic Libraries Pamela Jacobs / Information Resources Librarian / University of Guelph / @pamelajacobs Klara Maidenberg / Assessment Librarian / Ontario Council of University Libraries / @_klara Jane Schmidt / Head, Collection Services / Ryerson University / @janeschmidt Electronic Resources & Libraries, March 2014
    2. 2. We’re from the north
    3. 3. Our ebook acquisitions landscape • DDA/PDA • E-approval plans • Subscriptions • Firm orders • Consortial purchases (packages) • E-reserves & e-textbooks
    4. 4. Evaluation
    5. 5. Evaluation Usage* is a key metric for evaluating ebooks
    6. 6. Evaluation Usage* is a key metric for evaluating ebooks *Usage is just one aspect of a complete collection evaluation strategy. Wholesome assessment must supplement usage with other data, and qualitative study of usefulness and usability
    7. 7. Evaluation Usage* is a key metric for evaluating ebooks *Usage is just one aspect of a complete collection evaluation strategy. Wholesome assessment must supplement usage with other data, and qualitative study of usefulness and usability **Collection gaps do not show up in usage reports
    8. 8. What constitutes a use? Report Metric COUNTER BR2 Sections viewed, printed or downloaded COUNTER BR1 Usage by title COUNTER BR3 Number of turnaways COUNTER BR5 Searches *Book page views Logs *Title page views Logs Unique visitor counts Logs, Google Analytics or similar Peak demand times Logs, Google Analytics or similar Access by operating system Google Analytics or similar Content focused reports User focused reports
    9. 9. Aims: • Collective purchasing • Shared digital information infrastructure • Collaborative assessment
    10. 10. In-house developed discovery and access platform • Publisher packages • Guided by member committee • Model license • local load • DRM free & DRM restricted 600,000+ titles so far
    11. 11. Opportunities: • preservation and perpetual access • access to logs and reliable usage data • comparison and benchmarking
    12. 12. Opportunities: • preservation and perpetual access • access to logs and reliable usage data • comparison and benchmarking Challenges: • Budget disparities • Discovery and access • Assessment • DRM restrictions
    13. 13. High quality collection, includes course adoption titles Local loading, perpetual access and exclusive platform 15 university presses Mixture of 4 DRM types
    14. 14. Mixed (DRM) bag Figure credit: OCUL office report Nov. 20, 2013 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 Athabasca University Press CPRC Laval University McGill-Queen's University Press Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies PUQ University of British Columbia University of Alberta University of Calgary University of Manitoba University of Montreal University of Ottawa University of Toronto University of Toronto Higher Ed Wilfrid Laurier University Press MUPO SUPO SUPO+ OPEN ACCESS
    15. 15. Findings For MUPO titles, users read an average of 4 pages in each title For SUPO titles, 12% of visitors end up borrowing the book For SUPO+, that number is even lower (9%)
    16. 16. Usage can tell us… • How much is the package being used • What proportion of the package is being used • How intensely are individual titles being used • Is the package more popular with some schools • Cost per use/cost per title
    17. 17. • University founded in 1964 • Ontario Agricultural College 1874 • Ontario Veterinary College 1862 • FTE 26,000 • ARL & CARL member
    18. 18. Library core values • Learning • Service • Stewardship • Access • Intellectual Freedom • Innovation • Communication • Integrity
    19. 19. Context for book selection • Institutional alignment • Curated collection • Shared discovery system • Collaboration via consortia • Collections Team • Discovery and Access Team
    20. 20. “You are not buying content … You are buying content, software, licenses, DRM and an ongoing relationship with a vendor.” – Sue Polanka http://ebookchallenge.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Curation_ebooks_Polanka_Sept2012_for_JISC.pdf
    21. 21. Ebook selection at UG • Ebooks vs print books • E-preferred approvals • Packages • Title by title selection • Standing orders
    22. 22. Ebook preferences at UG • Purchase • Perpetual access • DRM free • Multiple users
    23. 23. Ebooks available at UG • Publisher direct • Aggregators • Specific collections • Primary source databases • Open access
    24. 24. Evaluating use • Metrics • Turnaways • Overlap • Discovery • UX
    25. 25. Publisher package – front list purchase Pros • One invoice • Low cost/title • Simplified selection • DRM free, unlimited users • Local loading permitted
    26. 26. Publisher package – front list purchase Pros • One invoice • Low cost/title • Simplified selection • DRM free, unlimited users • Local loading Cons • Not comprehensive • MARC records quality • Complicated workflow • Delayed discovery • Low usage
    27. 27. Title by title selection Pros • Clear entitlement • DRM free, unlimited users • Improved discovery • Increased usage
    28. 28. Title by title selection Pros • Clear entitlement • DRM free, unlimited users • Titles in catalogue sooner • Increased usage Cons • More hands-on selection required • Higher cost
    29. 29. Ebook preferences • Purchase • Perpetual access • DRM free • Multiple users
    30. 30. Ebook preferences revisited • Purchase • Perpetual access • DRM free • Multiple users • MARC records • Clear entitlement • Sustainable
    31. 31. The long tail is slowly killing us …. … and if we aren’t proactive in finding a solution, we could go the way of diplodocus. Licensed under Creative Commons: http://fav.me/d4jwfrx
    32. 32. The Ryerson context – we are that snowflake
    33. 33. Ryerson’s collection philosophy • Use over depth and breadth • Access over ownership • Largely automated
    34. 34. History of Ryerson’s monograph acquisitions by order type
    35. 35. Ryerson’s approval plan is: • Publisher neutral • Subject driven • E-preferred • Platform neutral • Lean on auto-shipments • Slips vetted for DDA eligibility and added to pool on weekly basis
    36. 36. Benefits Simplified record management Enhanced duplication control Higher quality cataloguing Central invoicing Item level price information in ILS
    37. 37. We do not want to play the role of the cat who ate the canary (no matter how handsome). Licensed under Creative Commons: http://images.cdn.fotopedia.com/flickr-385650640-original.jpg
    38. 38. By Bit Boy (Flickr: The Elephant in the Room) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
    39. 39. Ryerson Guelph Aggregator 1 - non linear lending Publisher 1 - unlimited Aggregator 1 - textbook Publisher 2 - unlimited Aggregator 1 - unlimited Publisher 3 - unlimited Publisher 4 - unlimited Aggregator 2 - one user Publisher 5 - unlimited Aggregator 2 - 3 users Publisher 6 - unlimited Aggregator 2 - unlimited Publisher 7 - unlimited Publisher 8 - unlimited Aggregator 3 - one user Aggregator 3 - 3 users Aggregator 4 - unlimited Aggregator 3 - unlimited Aggregator 2 - unlimited Aggregator 3 - unlimited Publisher 1 - unlimited Aggregator 4 - unlimited Publisher 8 - 3 users Publisher 3 - unlimited Aggregator 2 - 3 users Publisher 4 - unlimited Aggregator 3 - 3 users Publisher 8 - 1 user Aggregator 2 - one user Aggregator 3 - one user Preferred source – due to simplicity of lending model Prefer one user for cost effectiveness; monitor turnaways Ebooks Ranking of Preferred Ebook Platforms Prefer publisher platforms that are DRM free Prefer unlimited access to avoid turnaways
    40. 40. Conclusions The definition of success varies depending on context One way is not necessarily better than the other, but ideally we get the best of both worlds: • DRM free/UX • Perpetual access • Demand driven options • Sustainable pricing • Administrative support
    41. 41. Questions?
    42. 42. Thank you!
    43. 43. Suggested readings Blummer, B. & Kenton, J. (2012). Best practices for integrating e-books in academic libraries : a literature review from 2005 to present. Collection Management, 37(2), 65-97. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01462679.2012.660851 Bucknell, T. ( 2010). The ‘big deal’ approach to acquiring e-books: a usage based study. Serials, 33(2), 126-134. DOI 10.1629/23126 Cox, J. (2007). Making sense of E-book usage data. The Acquisitions Librarian, 19(3-4), 193-211. DOI: 10.1080/08963570802026278 Hodge, V., Manoff, M., & Watson, G. (2013). Providing access to E-books and E-book collections: Struggles and solutions. The Serials Librarian, 64(1-4), 200-205. doi:10.1080/0361526X.2013.760411 Lewis, D. W. (2013). From stacks to the web: the transformation of academic library collecting. College & research libraries, 74(2), 159-177. Pickett, C., Tabacaru, S., & Harrell, J. (2014). E-approval plans in research libraries. College & Research Libraries, 75(2). Sens, J. M., & Fonseca, A. J. (2013). A Skeptic's View of Patron-Driven Acquisitions: Is it Time to ask the Tough Questions? Technical Services Quarterly, 30(4), 359-371. Tenopir, C. (2011). Beyond usage: measuring library outcomes and value. Library Management, 33(1/2), 5-13. Doi: 10.1108/01435121211203275 Walters, W. H. (2013). E-books in Academic Libraries: Challenges for discovery and access. Serials Review, 39, 97-104. Walters, W. H. (2013). E-books in Academic Libraries: Challenges for Acquisition and Collection Management. portal : Libraries and the academy, 13(2), 187-211. http://resolver.scholarsportal.info/resolve/153
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