Greenhouse effect

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  • Recently I found this interesting article about a study by Nasa on greenhouse effect http://www.paperleap.com/articles/en/greenhouse-gases-are-warming-the-world
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Greenhouse effect

  1. 1. GreenhouseEffect<br />Pamela Moncayo<br />
  2. 2. Is a process by which thermal radiation from a planetary surface is absorbed by atmospheric greenhouse gases, and is re-radiated in all directions. <br />Since part of this re-radiation is back towards the surface, energy is transferred to the surface and the lower atmosphere<br />
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  4. 4.  The temperature there is higher than it would be if direct heating by solar radiation were the only warming mechanism<br />
  5. 5. The greenhouse effect was discovered by Joseph Fourier in 1824, first reliably experimented on by John Tyndall in 1858, and first reported quantitatively by Svante Arrhenius in 1896.<br />
  6. 6. Global warming, a recent warming of the Earth's surface and lower atmosphere,is believed to be the result of a strengthening of the greenhouse effect mostly due to human-produced increases in atmospheric greenhouse gases<br />
  7. 7. Greenhouse Gases<br />By their percentage contribution to the greenhouse effect on Earth the four major gases are:<br />water vapor, 36–70%<br />carbon dioxide, 9–26%<br />methane, 4–9%<br />ozone, 3–7%<br />The major non-gas contributor to the Earth's greenhouse effect, clouds, also absorb and emit infrared radiation and thus have an effect on radiative properties of the atmosphere.<br />
  8. 8. Role in climatechange<br />CO2 is produced by fossil fuel burning and other activities such as cement production and tropical deforestation.<br />Measurements of CO2 from the Mauna Loa observatory show that concentrations have increased from about 313 ppm in 1960 to about 389 ppm in 2010. <br />The current observed amount of CO2 exceeds the geological record maxima (~300 ppm) from ice core data.<br /> The effect of combustion-produced carbon dioxide on the global climate, a special case of the greenhouse effect first described in 1896 by Svante Arrhenius, has also been called the Callendar effect.<br />

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