Web2.0 disaster

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  • Poll audience as to who is who, get a feel for who knows what Who I am...disseminating correct information
  • Showed this to a colleague who didn't recognize it
  • Saw a msg on a board today asking for info to help recruit for oil spill

Transcript

  • 1. Disaster: Potentials and Pitfalls of Web 2.0 Use in Public Emergencies Peter A. Lipson, MD William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine, WSU, OUWBSOM Medical and Science Blogger
  • 2. Web 2.0: WTF?
    • Web 2.0 usually includes rapid forms of electronic communication such as:
      • Twitter
      • 3. Blogs
      • 4. Social Networking sites (such as facebook)
      • 5. Wikis
    • Web communities have their own languages and cultures
      • Allowing web communities to control the language
    • Key to Web 2.0 is rapid sharing of information
  • 6. Medicine on the Web: Impact
    • According to Pew, over 60% of people obtain and act on medical information found online.
    • 7. http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2009/8-The-Social-Life-of-Health-Information.aspx
    • 8. Regarding the quality of that informaion...
  • 9. Your results may vary
  • 10. Medicine on the Web: Quality
    • There is no official arbiter of medical information online
    • 11. Commercial sites often masquerade as information
    • 12. Alternative medicine sites are very popular and helped spread misinformation during the H1N1 pandemic
  • 13. Opportunities
    • Medicine 2.0 has many participants, opportunities for contact
    • 14. Information can be spread rapidly
    • 15. Information can spread via multiple independent media (cell phone, internet, etc)
    • 16. Is there an online “ethic” of social responsibility?
  • 17. Pitfalls
    • Any attempt to harness the social media for “good” may be hijacked
    • 18. Misinformation can be spread easily (Iran)
    • 19. Unethical users can co-opt disaster networks for commercial or other purposes
  • 20. Web 2.0 in Disasters
    • Preparedness
      • Early warning
    • Response
    • 21. Recovery
    • 22. Mitigation
  • 23. Preparedness 2.0
    • Audience
      • Lay public
      • 24. Concerned professionals
      • 25. Agencies and officials
  • 26. Preparedness 2.0: Audience
    • Lay public: readers of medical blogs are interested in reading about disasters, and may be interested in learning about their roles.
    • 27. Ongoing conversation may mitigate apathy
    • 28. Transparency regarding allocation of scarce medical resources
  • 29. Preparedness 2.0: Audience
    • Concerned Professionals read medical blogs and are interested in learning about disaster and their possible roles as allies
  • 30. Preparedness 2.0
    • Agencies and officials can monitor online resources and liase with potential allies
    • 31. Staff policies to avoid free-lancing
  • 32. Response 2.0
    • Early Warning
    • 33. Real time dissemination of information
    • 34. Accuracy
    • 35. Centralization?
  • 36. Response 2.0: Duck and Cover!
    • We can do better than tornado sirens
    • 37. Extensive reach, but targeted info; links to more information for those most affected
  • 38. Response 2.0:Notification
    • USGS maintains earthquake notification site
    • 39. Via xkcd.com:
  • 40. Response 2.0: Getting out the message
    • Rapid, flexible, and available information
    • 41. Redundancy: text, twitter via internet or phone
  • 42. Response 2.0: Accuracy
    • Internet notoriously full of crap
    • 43. Possible solution to create link to centralized data gathering and dissemination from official agency
    • 44. Example: Create blog post that says, “Up to date info on current disaster available at...”
  • 45. Recovery 2.0
    • Charity
    • 46. Coordination of unconventional resources
  • 47. Recovery 2.0
    • Haiti Rewired: Clearinghouse of blogposts, twitter-type updates, and contacts between people
    • 48. My own blog network today is featuring the spill and discussion boards are discussing gathering experts.
  • 49. Mitigation 2.0
    • Preparation of unconventional 2.0 networks?
    • 50. Creation of robust networks
    • 51. Asking for input as to risks, prevention strategies
    • 52. “crowd-sourcing” prevention
    • 53. brainstorming
  • 54. Starting points: who's going to help?
    • Identify reliable blogs, and reliable facebook and twitter personae with whom to communicate
    • 55. Identify goals: (your input please!)
      • Link to a common info site?
      • 56. Dissemination of specific information?
  • 57. An experiment
    • Single blog post and twitter update (“tweet”)
    • 58. Within 12 hours
      • 83 retweets
      • 59. 550 visits to blog post
      • 60. 165 visits from feedburner (prob. Twitter)
      • 61. 93 from facebook
      • 62. Rest from other sources
  • 63. In Sum
    • Opportunity to use interconnected, realtime networks to disseminate information
      • Hashtags and hashtag integrity
      • 64. Twitter id's
      • 65. DHS updates about 2x/wk...why bother following?
      • 66. Updates have brief half-life
    • Need to avoid hijacking by other agendas
    • 67. Creation of formal network? With “disaster response” badge?
    • 68. Ongoing conversation online
  • 69. My online contact info
    • Twitter @palmd
    • 70. Facebook
    • 71. Science-Based Medicine
    • 72. White Coat Underground
    • 73. Forbes Science Business Blog