Art Appreciation, Principles of Art: Unity, Variety, Balance, Scale, & Proportion
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Art Appreciation, Principles of Art: Unity, Variety, Balance, Scale, & Proportion

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An introduction to the principles of art, specifically unity, variety, balance, scale, and proportion.

An introduction to the principles of art, specifically unity, variety, balance, scale, and proportion.

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    Art Appreciation, Principles of Art: Unity, Variety, Balance, Scale, & Proportion Art Appreciation, Principles of Art: Unity, Variety, Balance, Scale, & Proportion Presentation Transcript

    • Art Appreciation Professor Paige Prater T, R, 9:30-10:50AM
    • 10 ELEMENTS of Art: 1. Color 2. Form 3. Line 4. Mass 5. Shape 6. Space 7. Texture 8. Time/Motion 9. Value 10. Volume
    • 10 PRINCIPLES of Art: 1. Unity 2. Variety 3. Balance 4. Emphasis 5. Focal Point 6. Pattern 7. Proportion 8. Rhythm 9. Scale 10. Contrast
    • Unity: order, wholeness, harmony in a design • Compositional – overall design • Conceptual – idea behind the work • Gestalt – ALL aspects ordered VS MONOTONY or CHAOS
    • Unity Katsushika Hokusai, “The Great Wave off Shore at Kanagawa,” from Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji, 1826–33 (printed later). Print, color woodcut. Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
    • Unity: 3 examples of COMPOSITIONAL unity
    • Unity: Conceptual Romare Bearden, The Dove, 1964. Cut-and-pasted printed papers, gouache, pencil, and colored pencil on board, 13⅜ x 18¾”. MOMA, New York
    • Unity: Gestalt • Whole greater than sum of its parts…concept, composition, creation… Vishnu Dreaming the Universe, c. 450–500 CE. Relief panel. Temple of Vishnu, Deogarh, Uttar Pradesh, India
    • Variety: visual diversity in one composition • Ideas • Elements: shapes, values • materials
    • Variety: materials Robert Rauschenberg, Monogram, 1955–9. Mixed media with taxidermy goat, rubber tire, and tennis ball, 42 x 63¼ x 64½”. Moderna Museet, Stockholm, Sweden
    • Balance: distribution of elements (unified or varied) within a work • Symmetrical • Asymmetrical • Radial
    • Balance: Symmetrical Ritual container from Gui, China, Shang Dynasty, 1600–1100 BCE. Bronze, 6¼ x 10¾”. University of Hong Kong Museum
    • Balance: Asymmetrical • Uneven distribution of value and shape • Visual“heaviness” of the right side counteracted by placing one shape lower on the left Muqi, Six Persimmons, Southern Song Dynasty, c. 1250. Ryoko-in, Dailoxu-ji, Kyoto, Japan
    • Balance: Radial • Equidistance from a single point Amitayas mandala created by the monks of Drepung Loseling Monastery, Tibet
    • Rehash • Unity, variety, and balance are central principles that artists use to create visual impact • Unity gives a work a certain oneness or cohesion • Variety is expressed in contrast and difference • Created by the use of different kinds of lines, shapes, patterns, colors, or textures • Balance is imposed on a work when the artist achieves an appropriate combination of unity and variety
    • SCALE • relative to our own size – MONUMENTAL – HUMAN SCALE – SMALL SIZE
    • Scale: MONUMENTAL
    • Scale: HUMAN SCALE Damien Hirst, Mother and Child (Divided), 1993
    • Scale: SMALL SIZE http://m.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/08/revealed-a-bookthe-size-of-a-ladybug/278427/
    • SCALE: Unexpected… Dorothea Tanning, Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, 1943. Oil on canvas, 16⅛ x 24”. Tate, London
    • PROPORTION: • Relationships between sizes of parts • Aids expression and description (and NATURALISM) • Egypt • Greece>Rome>Renaissance – Golden Section – Golden Mean – Fibonacci Sequence
    • Proportion: Egyptian cubit
    • Proportion: Golden Section, etc.
    • Proportion: Greece Poseidon (or Zeus), c. 460–450 BCE. Bronze, 6’10½” high. National Archaeological Museum, Athens, Greece
    • Proportion: Golden Rectangle • Golden Rectangles is a technique based on nesting inside each other a succession of rectangles based on the 1:1.618 proportions of the Golden Section • The shorter side of the outer rectangle becomes the longer side of the smaller rectangle inside it, and so on • =elegant spiral shape
    • Proportion: Golden Rectangle
    • Proportion: Golden Rectangle Henry Peach Robinson, Fading Away, 1858. Combination albumen print.
    • Proportion: Golden Rectangle
    • Proportion: Renaissance
    • Proportion: School of Athens • Raphael’s sensitivity to proportion reflects his pursuit of perfection • Magnificent scale = sense of importance • Parts of each figure are harmonious in relation to each other and portray an idealized form • Double emphasis on the center brings our attention to the opposing gestures of two famous Greek philosophers, Plato and Aristotle