• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Art Appreciation, Day2: Line, Shape, Contrast, Form, Mass, Volume, Texture
 

Art Appreciation, Day2: Line, Shape, Contrast, Form, Mass, Volume, Texture

on

  • 1,140 views

An introduction to the elements and principles of art, specifically line, shape, contrast, form, mass, volume, and texture. Includes examples by Andre Masson, Otto Dix, Kara Walker, Meret Oppenheim, ...

An introduction to the elements and principles of art, specifically line, shape, contrast, form, mass, volume, and texture. Includes examples by Andre Masson, Otto Dix, Kara Walker, Meret Oppenheim, M.C. Escher, and more! Based on "Gateways to Art" (2012) by DeWitte, Larmann, and Shields.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,140
Views on SlideShare
891
Embed Views
249

Actions

Likes
2
Downloads
8
Comments
1

1 Embed 249

https://dcccd.blackboard.com 249

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1 previous next

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Art Appreciation, Day2: Line, Shape, Contrast, Form, Mass, Volume, Texture Art Appreciation, Day2: Line, Shape, Contrast, Form, Mass, Volume, Texture Presentation Transcript

    • Art Appreciation, Day 2: Line, Shape, Contrast, etc. Professor Paige Prater T, R, 9:30-10:50AM
    • 10 ELEMENTS of Art: 1. Color 2. Form 3. Line 4. Mass 5. Shape 6. Space 7. Texture 8. Time/Motion 9. Value 10. Volume
    • 10 PRINCIPLES of Art: 1. Unity 2. Variety 3. Balance 4. Emphasis 5. Focal Point 6. Pattern 7. Proportion 8. Rhythm 9. Scale 10. Contrast
    • Two-dimensional art: • Line • Shape • Contrast
    • Mel Bochner, Vertigo, 1982. Charcoal, conte’ crayon, and pastel on canvas, 9’x6’2”. Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY.
    • • Regular/irregular • Actual/implied • Vertical/Horizontal/Diagonal
    • Regular/Irregular Line Andre Masson, Automatic Drawing, 1925-6. Ink on paper, 12 x91/2”. Muse’e National d’Art Moderne. Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France.
    • Actual/Implied LINE
    • Vertical/Horizontal/Diagonal LINE
    • SHAPE • A 2D area with boundaries (line, value, color) Rectilinear vs. curvilinear
    • Implied SHAPE
    • Example:
    • Positive/Negative SHAPE
    • Positive/Negative SHAPE • Contrast! – M.C. Escher Sky and Water I, 1938, woodcut, 17 1/8 x 17 3/8. The M. C. Escher Company, Netherlands
    • Kara Walker, artist http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o 6t-S_DFxCI Biographical analysis: what experiences/opinions does she share that influence her subject matter?
    • Other types of analysis: • Formal: elements and principles of art • Psychological: interprets artist’s mental state • Contextual: historical, religious, political economic, social, etc. • Feminist: role of women in the artwork as subjects, creators, patrons, and viewers • Iconographic: objects and figures as signs or symbols (often religious or historical)
    • Three-dimensional art: • Form (vs. SHAPE) • Height, width, depth – Volume – amount of space occupied – Mass- solidity (small or massive) • Texture – tangible (3D) or imaginary (2D)
    • Form Volume Mass Great Pyramid of Kuhuf, c. 2560 BCE, Giza, Egypt
    • Texture • http://www.moma.org/collection/object.php?object_id=80997 Me’ret Oppenheim, Object, 1936. Fur-covered cup, saucer, and spoon, 2 7/8” high, MOMA, New York.
    • Analyze • Otto Dix, Kriegeskrueppel (War Cripples), 1920. Drypoint, 12 ¾ x19 ½”, MOMA, New York.
    • Group Work: Analyze Shepard Fairey, Obey, 1996. Georgia O’Keeffe, Music—Pink and Blue II, 1919. Oil on canvas, 35x29 1/8”. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.