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What will women's empowerment mean for men?
 

What will women's empowerment mean for men?

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We often talk about what women’s empowerment might mean for women - more opportunities and flexibility in the workplace, financial independence, and improved quality of life. But what will women’s ...

We often talk about what women’s empowerment might mean for women - more opportunities and flexibility in the workplace, financial independence, and improved quality of life. But what will women’s empowerment mean for men? For husbands, fathers, sons?

At PwC, we believe women’s empowerment means more choices for both women and men – choices which can have intensely positive ramifications for our social and economic fabric worldwide.

We believe that if we can candidly answer this question, the final barriers to women permeating the top ranks in critical mass may begin to fall away.

More: http://pwc.to/1ca9KRr

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    What will women's empowerment mean for men? What will women's empowerment mean for men? Presentation Transcript

    • What will women’s empowerment mean for men? Selected facts and figures to spark your thinking Prepared for the Women’s Forum for the Economy and Society by PwC October 2011
    • What will women’s empowerment mean for men? Have your say For the first time, the Women’s Forum for the Economy and Society in association with CNBC Creative Solutions and PwC will stage a consultation to capture your views on the question, “What will women’s empowerment mean for men?” We’ve selected some interesting facts and figures to spark your thinking on this topic. Take a look and then have your say at www.WomenInBusiness.CNBC.com
    • European men are shifting to part-time work faster than European women EU15 employment, age 15-74 (100=year1995) EU15 employment Male part-time 200 Female part-time 180 Female full-time Male full-time 160 140 120 100 09 20 07 20 08 06 20 05 04 20 20 03 20 02 20 01 20 00 20 99 20 98 19 97 Source: Eurostat (2010) 19 96 19 19 19 95 80 Prepared by PwC
    • Just 2.8% of Fortune 500 CEOs are women Percentage of positions held by women, 2010 Gender gap in the executive pipeline 50% 40 30 Fortune 500 (US) 20 10 0 Management, professional and related occupations, all US Source: Catalyst (2011) Boards of directors Executive officers Top-earners CEOs Prepared by PwC
    • The percentage of Fortune 500 executives who are women has plateaued since 2002 Women in corporate office positions Percentage of Fortune 500 (US) corporate officers who are women 20% 15 10 5 0 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Source: Catalyst (2010) Prepared by PwC
    • Gender imbalances are more pronounced at senior levels of management in Asia Women in Asia’s workforce 50% All occupations Women as share of workforce, average for 2000-08 Senior officials and managers 40 30 20 10 0 South Asia South-East Asia East Asia Source: United Nations Millennium Development Report 2010 Developed regions Note: Developed region includes North America, Western Europe, Japan and Oceania. Prepared by PwC
    • Firms with more women in leadership positions outperform non-diverse firms Executive committee diversity and performance 25% Top quartile in sector on female share of executive committee No women on executive committee ROE/EBIT margin 20 15 10 5 0 Return on equity, 2007-09 Source: McKinsey (2010) Average EBIT margin, 2007-09 Prepared by PwC
    • Wage gaps emerge as women advance Difference in female and male wages or UK executives, 2011 (percentage of male wages) UK executive wages 4% 2 0 Junior executive More senior Team leader Function head Director -2 -4 -6 -8 Source: UK Chartered Management Institute (2011) Prepared by PwC
    • Start-ups create jobs in the US, but are more likely to be male-owned Job creation and entrepreneurship in the US Cumulative jobs created/lost in the US, 2000-05 (millions) 40 15 30 10 20 5 0 10 Owned solely or primarily by women Owned solely or primarly by men 0 Percentage of start-ups that have employees other than the founder, US 50% 20 Start-ups Existing firms -5 -10 Source: Kaufman Foundation (2010 and 2011) Prepared by PwC
    • More gender equity leads to happier populations Gender gap and life satisfaction 9 US Saudi Arabia Sweden France 7 China 6 5 Yemen India 4 More satisfied Life Satisfaction Index, 2005 8 3 Tanzania 2 0.4 More equal 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 Gender Gap Index, 2006 Source: World Economic Forum (2010); Happy Planet Index (2011) Prepared by PwC
    • Gender gaps in labour force participation have narrowed in emerging markets Labour force participation by region Men Women Labour force participation 100% 80 60 40 20 0 1980 2009 World 1980 2009 Developed countries Source: World Development indicators (2011) 1980 2009 East Asia/Pacific 1980 2009 Sub-Saharan Africa 1980 2009 South Asia 1980 2009 Latin America Prepared by PwC
    • Companies in developing regions are addressing their gender-related practices Percentage of CEOs who plan “some change” or “significant change” to their policies to attract and retain more women in the next 12 months CEOs who plan to change their policies to attract and retain more women 60% 50 40 30 20 10 0 Central and Eastern Europe North America Western Europe Source: PwC 14th Annual Global CEO Survey (2011) Asia Pacific Africa Latin America Middle East Prepared by PwC
    • What will women’s empowerment mean for men? “Fathers in dual-earner couples feel significantly greater work-life conflict than mothers, and this level of conflict has risen steadily and relatively rapidly” Source: Boston College Center for Work and Family (2011) “There’s little correlation between a group’s intelligence and the IQ of its members. But if a group includes more women its collective intelligence rises.” Source: Harvard Business Review (2011)
    • What will women’s empowerment mean for men? “For the US to raise female employment levels to male employment levels would raise GDP by 7-9 percentage points; for continental Europe by 9 percentage points; for Japan by 16 percentage points. And for many developing economies the gains would be even bigger than that.” Source: PwC, “The Gender Gap: Challenges, opportunities and the future” (2008)
    • What will women’s empowerment mean for men? “Female pathways to greater empowerment include a broader range of factors, largely dependent on the ability to make decision, be free of violence, and participate in social networks. Male pathways are much narrower and dominated by the economy and the existence of and access to jobs.” Source: World Development Report 2012
    • Share your views and see what others are saying at www.WomenInBusiness.CNBC.com Learn more at www.pwc.com/women This material was prepared for the specific use of the Women’s Forum for the Economy and Society by PwC and is not to be used, distributed or relied upon by any third party without PwC’s prior written consent. The analysis and opinions contained in this presentation are based on publicly available sources, but PwC has not independently verified this information and makes no representation or warranty, express or implied, that such information is accurate or complete. All recipients of this material must make their own independent assessment of the material, and neither PwC nor any affiliates, partners, officers, employees, agents or advisers of any member firm of the PwC network shall be liable for any direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage suffered by any person as a result of relying on any statement in, or alleged omission from, this presentation. © 2011 PwC. All rights reserved. Not for further distribution without the permission of PwC. “PwC” refers to the network of member firms of PricewaterhouseCoopers International Limited (PwCIL), or, as the context requires, individual member firms of the PwC network. Each member firm is a separate legal entity and does not act as agent of PwCIL or any other member firm. PwCIL does not provide any services to clients. PwCIL is not responsible or liable for the acts or omissions of any of its member firms nor can it control the exercise of their professional judgment or bind them in any way. No member firm is responsible or liable for the acts or omissions of any other member firm nor can it control the exercise of another member firm’s professional way. Prepared for the Women’s Forum for the Economy and Society by PwC.