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Pedestrian Simulation: Modelling Dynamics

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They move around, make sudden turns or stop spontaneously. But as soon as the population density of pedestrians reaches a certain threshold, they manage to organise themselves into a group. Quite …

They move around, make sudden turns or stop spontaneously. But as soon as the population density of pedestrians reaches a certain threshold, they manage to organise themselves into a group. Quite naturally they form stripes in corridors or create oscillatory flows at bottlenecks. With PTV Viswalk one can model and simulate that physical and social forces. It is based on the Social Force Model developed by Prof. Helbing. This infographic shows you how people act when walking and how this can be modelled within a pedestrian simulation. http://vision-traffic.prvgroup.com/viswalk

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  • 1. http://vision-traffic.ptvgroup.com/viswalk OBSTACLES In PTV Viswalk, walls also exert a repulsive force. As a result, pedes- trians are modelled as maintaining an extra distance from a wall in the presence of a small number of people, thereby taking a slight detour compared to what is actually the shortest route. ENCOUNTERING OTHER PEDESTRIANS In order to avoid collisions with others, pedestrians adjust their pace, overtaking slower pedes- trians and moving out of the way of oncoming ones. PTV Viswalk harnesses these forces. There is my flight to Los Angeles! With the high speed train I willarrive relaxed at the airport! FINDING THE FASTEST ROUTE When choosing a route, a pedestrian usually takes the shortest. In PTV Viswalk, a static potential is generated to measure the distances to the destination. Caution! AVOIDING CROWDS Large numbers of people are perceived as a group and not as individuals. They represent an obstacle for the pedestrian. In PTV Viswalk, this is modelled as dynamic potential. Pedestri- ans do not then choose the shortest route, but the one which will probably take the least time. ONLY IN PTV Viswalk INTERACTING WITH PRIVATE TRANSPORT PTV Viswalk is fully integrated into PTV Vissim. Crossing a street is modelled using the same objects as for encountering vehicles at a junction. If pedestrians have right of way, vehicles wait for the pedestrian flow to pass and vice versa. INTERACTING WITH PUBLIC TRANSPORT Integrating PTV Viswalk and PTV Vissim enables the interaction between bus, railway and pedes- trians to be mapped in a single simulation.This means that actions such as changing buses or trains can also be mapped. PEDESTRIAN SIMULATION: MODELLING DYNAMICS They move around, make sudden turns or stop spontaneously. But as soon as the population density of pedestrians reaches a certain threshold, they manage to organise themselves into a group. Quite naturally they form stripes in corridors or create oscillatory flows at bottlenecks. With PTV Viswalk one can model and simulate that physical and social forces. It is based on the Social Force Model developed by Prof. Helbing. 1 START: PEDESTRIAN 2 START: PEDESTRIAN 1 2 How do I get round this crowd? Hello!Hello! How was your trip? 12 Let’s go to L.A.! Yeah! DESTINATION: DEPARTURE