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Prout e a Economia Descentralizada - Colin Whitelaw
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Prout e a Economia Descentralizada - Colin Whitelaw

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  • 1. Economic Decentralization COLIN WHITELAW
  • 2. Rapid Growth in Relocalization  1 billion people belong to cooperatives  Cooperatives employ more than 100 million people  6000 + Community Supported Agriculture projects in the US. More than a million participants in Japan.  Registered Transition Movement projects grew from 0 400 between 2005 and 2010)  More than 2500 alternative currencies operate around the world.  Between 1994 and 2000 the number of Farmers Markets in the USA grew by 63 %. The number today is estimated at more than 4000.
  • 3. Dominant Trend is Widening Inequality  The wealthiest 10% own 89% of the world’s wealth (Credit Suisse, 2013)  There are 2.2 billion children in the world. Every second child lives in poverty (Wikipedia)  80% of people in the world live in countries where wealth disparity is increasing (2007 UN Human Development Report)  In the first two years of “Recovery” the top 7% of Americans increased their wealth by 7% while the remaining 93% saw their wealth decreased by 4% (Pew Research Center, April 2013)
  • 4. The Prout Model  Integrated Decentralization combining:  Regional Self-Reliance  Democratically owned and controlled means of production  Effective Controls on Wealth Disparity  Local Level Economic Planning  Production for Consumption not Profit  Holistic Worldview  World Government
  • 5. Self-Reliant Socio-Economic Zones  A healthy balance of industry and agriculture capable of supplying the basic necessities of life  Could be many within one country or one composed of a group of countries  No Foreign Ownership  Temporary Protection of Industry  Free Trade in Areas of Surplus and Deficit  Barter Where Possible  Amalgamation Amongst Equal Zones
  • 6. Benefits of Self-Reliance  Prosperity Through Balanced Development  Prosperity Without Exploitation  World Peace and Economic Stability  Better use of human and natural resources  Reduction of Waste  Cultural and Economic Diversity
  • 7. Democratic Control of Production  Key Industries  Midsize Industries  Small Business - Local Government Cooperatives Private Enterprise  Note: No Scope for Large Corporations
  • 8. Key Industries Under Local Government Benefits:  Ability to Locate Industries Where Needed (rather than where profitable)  Creates Infrastructure for growth of smaller industries  Keeps Industry Responsible to the Local People  Wealth Remains in the Region  Adaptability to Local Conditions  Expands the Commons/Collective Wealth  Keeps Investments Tied to Real Economy
  • 9. Cooperative Middle Sector Benefits:  Permits Efficiency and Economies of Scale  Motivates Effort and Ingenuity yet Guards Against Wealth Disparity  Security of Employment  Eliminates Need for Middle Men  Democratic Working Environment Conducive to Personal And Spiritual Growth
  • 10. Small Scale Private Enterprise Benefits:  Motivates Effort and Enterprise without posing a risk to Collective Welfare
  • 11. Integration of Decentralized Economy 11 Artists and fashion designers Textile cooperatives Public utilities produce nylon and cotton thread Proutist Universal
  • 12. Effective Controls on Wealth Disparity (“Rational Distribution”)  Constitutional Guarantees for:  Minimum Requirements of Life  Employment  Increasing Purchasing Power  Collectively Agreed Ceilings on Wealth  Individual Incentives Only Provided from Surplus Wealth after meeting the Minimum Requirements  Incentives linked to Social Value of Work
  • 13. Benefits of Rational Distribution  Security and Happiness for All  Affluent, Well-educated Population Good for     Economy Higher Productivity No Unhealthy Speculation Social Solidarity Greater Opportunity for Cultural and Spiritual Growth
  • 14. Local Level Economic Planning  Beginning at Small Town and District Level  No outside interference in Economy  Coordination with other towns and higher level jurisdictions Benefits:  Proper Knowledge of Local Needs and Conditions  Local Accountability
  • 15. Production for Consumption not Profit  People before Profit  No Profit No Loss mode for Public Utilities  Rational Profit for rest of economy (about 15%) Benefits:  Subordinates the economy to the society not vice versa  Better utilization of resources  Prevents Concentration of Wealth  Rapidly increases General Prosperity  Discourages Greed
  • 16. Holistic Worldview and Consciousness  Strong Sense of Interconnectedness  Motivates Inclusive and Benevolent Behaviour  Utilizes untapped Psychic and Spiritual Resources  Satisfies Desire for Happiness on higher levels relieving pressure on scarce material resources  A kind of Decentralization 
  • 17. World Government  Fair play requires a strong referee