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Walking Tour Assignment Part I (Final)

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  • 1. Walking
Tour
Assignment
 Part
I

  • 2. Walking
Tour
Assignment

  • 3. Built
Environment
 •  New
lo9
and
apartment
construc=on
to
bring
people
into
the
 city
for
purposes
other
than
work
 •  Street
Vendors
around
Santee
Alley
in
the
Fashion
District
 •  How
wide
Broadway
is
and
all
of
the
shops
on
the
first
floor
 with
renovated
apartments
above
 •  The
numerous
theaters
along
Broadway
 •  The
recycling
of
old
buildings
into
apartments
and
lo9s.

  • 4. Image
of
LA
City
 •  Lynch
had
noted
that
people
were
familiar
with
Downtown
Los
Angeles,
not
 because
of
residence,
but
because
of
their
work.

This
is
beginning
to
change
as
 many
old
buildings
are
being
converted
into
apartments
and
lo9s
as
well
as
new
 buildings
being
constructed
so
more
people
can
live
downtown.

Also
Lynch
talked
 about
how
there
is
the
central
downtown,
but
there
are
also
several
basic
cores
or
 ci=es.

This
is
s=ll
true,
but
these
"basic
cores"
are
becoming
connected
as
the
Los
 Angeles
region
grows
and
infill
becomes
more
prominent.

In
50
years
the
image
of
 Los
Angeles
will
be
more
focused
on
density
and
infill
and
the
reflec=on
by
many
 as
Los
Angeles
being
spread
out
or
spacious
will
not
be
as
common.

50
years
ago
 when
Lynch
wrote
the
book,
Pershing
Square
was
much
more
prominent
as
a
 landmark,
however
today
as
the
center
of
downtown
has
moved
west
Pershing
 Square
is
not
as
recognizable
of
a
district
or
landmark
as
it
once
was.
The
smog
 and
air
quality
will
con=nue
to
be
noted
in
50
years
and
will
most
likely
be
more
 common
of
a
response
when
people
are
asked
to
describe
Los
Angeles.

  • 5. Below
grade
dining
area

 John
Paul
Cisneros

  • 6. ASrac=ve
open
space
away
from
street

 John
Paul
Cisneros

  • 7. Public
music
on
sidewalk
 John
Paul
Cisneros

  • 8. 5
Notable
Features

 •  1.
The
accuracy
and
precision
of
the
theories
put
forth
by
the
film
we
 watched
the
class
before
the
final.

The
most
pronounced
func=on
I
 observed
taking
place
was
that
people
want
to
be
seen
by
other
people.

 Consequently,
the
public
spaces
near
high‐traffic
corridors,
e.g.,
the
street,
 were
much
more
vivacious
than
those
areas
that
were
more
secluded.

 •  2.
The
idea
of
public
art
not
necessarily
having
to
be
visual,
as
seen
by
the
 amphitheater
we
visited.

I
think
there
is
a
lot
of
poten=al
there
to
create
 some
really
cool
visual‐auditory‐sensory
public
art.

 •  3.
The
goats
who
“mowed”
the
grass
of
the
park
near
California
Plaza
as
a
 related
form
of
carbon
sequestering.

 •  4.
The
mild
lack
of
walkability
of
some
areas,
e.g.,
a
narrow
sidewalk
 directly
abung
a
major
rode
without
any
barrier
of
trees
or
something
of
 the
like.

 •  5.
The
amount
of
above‐
or
below‐grade
public
space.

The
below‐grade
 spaces
were
par=cularly
surprising
with
Los
Angeles’s
temperate
climate.
 John
Paul
Cisneros

  • 9. Image
of
the
City:
Year
2009
 •  With
the
excep=on
of
Angel’s
Li9
as
a
clearly
defined
 “Lynchian
edge”
separa=ng
two
“Lynchian
districts,”
the
space
 in
downtown
Los
Angeles
proper
seemed
to
be
consolidated
 space.

Par=cularly
in
many
of
the
business
parks
we
visited,
 e.g.,
California
Plaza,
there
was
a
unified
movement
of
space.

 There
were
few
unmistakably
defined
separa=ons
of
 ownership
or
uses,
channels,
and
strategic
entrance
points.



 As
a
result,
it
strikes
me
that
given
the
density,
physical
 diversity,
and
patchwork
of
many
of
America’s
urban
cores,
 Lynch’s
ideas
of
paths,
nodes,
and
landmarks
no
longer
are
as
 pronounced
as
they
once
were
central
business
districts.

 However,
his
ideas
of
major
districts
and
edges,
I
do
believe
 s=ll
do
hold
weight,
par=cularly
for
a
ci=es
as
a
whole.
 John
Paul
Cisneros

  • 10. Jessica
Eshaghzadeh
 PPD
245
 Professor
Banerjee
 November
12,
2009

  • 11. • As
we
came
across
Disney
Hall,
the
structure
of
the
 building
really
stood
out
to
me
than
the
buildings
I
see
 in
my
everyday
life.
 • 
The
fountain
and
benches
amused
me
because
in
Los
 Angeles
you
don’t
usually
come
across
an
atmosphere
 like
that.
It
reminded
me
of
different
ci=es
in
Europe.
 It
seemed
like
the
man
in
the
picture
was
having
a
 very
quiet
and
peaceful
lunch.
 • As
I
came
across
this
sculpture,
I
was
stunned
to
see
 how
modern
and
ar=s=c
the
ar=st
had
designed
it.
 What
really
captured
my
eye
is
how
unusual
it
is.
 • 
As
we
walked
up
these
stairs,
it
reminded
me
of
 Rodeo
Dr.
in
Beverly
Hills.
It
gave
downtown
a
sense
of
 class
and
sophis=cated.
 • As
we
walked
into
the
church
the
first
thing
I
no=ced
 were
the
stained
glass
window
that
looked
very
similar
 to
the
temple
I
aSended.
Even
thought
the
two
 religions
are
conflic=ng,
they
looked
very
similar
to
 one
another
and
gave
it
a
very
drama=c
look.

  • 12. • When
Lynch
wrote
his
book
on
downtown,
Los
Angeles
image,
it
was
presented
very
 simple.
LA
has
changed
a
great
deal
from
what
it
was
decades
ago.
I
believe,
the
business
 district
has
grown
tremendously
and
will
con=nue
to
grow
gradually.
Not
only
has
the
 business
district
grown,
but
many
families
have
moved
down
to
downtown,
LA
to
raise
a
 family.
Downtown
is
not
the
safest
place
to
live
but
some
areas
of
downtown
have
grown
to
 be
a
very
aSrac=ve
and
sophis=cated
place.
 
Downtown,
Los
Angeles
in
fi9y
years
will
become
a
city
of
dreams
and
sophis=ca=on.
 As
of
now
downtown’s
popula=on
is
increasing
rapidly
and
in
about
fi9y
increase
the
 popula=on
will
increase
even
more.
The
developers
are
doing
a
fantas=c
job
making
 downtown
as
appealing
as
it
has
become.
In
fi9y
years
more
and
more
apartment
 buildings,
schools,
parks,
museums,
hotels,
etc.
will
be
built
in
many
areas
of
downtown.
 A9er
taking
our
tour,
I
realized
downtown
has
grown
rapidly
and
into
a
beau=ful
and
very
 appealing
city.
A9er
aSending
USC
for
a
year
and
a
half,
I
have
never
seen
the
areas
we
 walked
around
and
visited
that
day.
I
can
definitely
say
that
I’ve
considered
moving
to
 downtown
next
semester
for
my
last
semester
at
USC.

  • 13. •  5
things
that
stood
out
on
the
walking
tour
 •  Buildings
and
shops
close
together
 •  Varying
types
of
architecture
 •  Many
sidewalks
had
areas
that
were
privately
 owned
 •  There
were
trees
and
other
types
of
 vegeta=on
although
scarce
 •  Traffic
is
busy
during
the
day

  • 14. •  I
believe
that
the
image
of
LA
city
has
changed
by
 having
more
in
the
city
since
the
1950’s.
There
 are
more
things
to
do
and
more
points
of
 interest.
The
older
area
of
downtown
is
s=ll
intact
 but
is
not
the
focal
point
of
the
area.
LA
Live
and
 the
Staples
Center
is
more
of
a
focal
point.
In
50
 years
I
believe
LA
will
be
more
progressive,
a
lot
 smarter
and
more
livable.
LA
is
progressing
and
I
 believe
it
will
be
a
much
smarter
city
in
50
years.

  • 15. LA
Walking
Tour
 Amy
Conway

  • 16. 5
Things
that
Stood
Out
 •  Near
almost
every
building
or
cluster
of
buildings
there
was
a
huge
piece
of
public
art
that
created
 an
interes=ng
visual
and
aSracted
people
into
the
courtyards
in
between
these
skyscrapers.

They
 were
usually
brightly
colored
or
designed
out
of
an
interes=ng
material,
which
caught
the
eye
of
 passers‐by
at
least
in
our
walking
tour
group.

It
was
a
great
idea
for
Los
Angeles
to
require
every
 development
to
allocate
one
percent
of
its
cost
to
the
crea=on
of
public
art,
since
it
adds
a
lot
 visually
to
the
built
environment.


 •  I
no=ced
that
there
wasn’t
that
much
green
space
on
the
sidewalks,
but
then
as
you
con=nued
 walking,
there
would
be
green
space
in
the
built
courtyards
and
there
was
even
a
huge
park
that
 was
next
to
Angel
Flight,
which
I
had
never
seen
before.

The
park
had
children
running
all
around
it
 and
it
was
a
liSle
haven
that
shows
how
unique
Los
Angeles
is,
since
we
can
have
a
commercial
 development
site
right
next
door
to
a
luscious
park
with
huge
trees
and
gorgeous
green
grass.
 •  I
never
no=ced
before
how
much
of
Los
Angeles
is
layered
and
how
there
seem
to
be
two
levels
to
 almost
every
street.

It
was
evident
by
the
Biltmore
Hotel
where
there
were
raised
sidewalks
to
get
 the
pedestrians
off
of
the
streets.
However,
I
have
never
walked
on
those
plaiorms
but
I
have
 walked
on
the
streets
with
the
cars.

Also,
nearby
there
was
a
small
underground
shopping
mall
 that
was
filled
with
restaurants
and
it
did
not
seem
that
many
people
ventured
down
underground
 to
have
lunch.

The
entrance
to
the
shopping
mall
is
not
easily
recognized
and
most
people
just
 seem
to
walk
right
past
it,
which
I
have
done
for
years.

It
also
wasn’t
a
very
invi=ng
space
and
 seems
a
liSle
odd
to
be
venturing
underground
to
get
food.

  • 17. 5
Things
that
Stood
Out
 •  One
of
my
favorite
places
that
we
saw
on
the
tour
was
the
part
of
the
California
Plaza
that
 stretched
between
the
Omni
Hotel
and
the
Bank
of
the
West
Building,
which
has
a
gorgeous
 fountain
and
courtyard.

The
fountain
wraps
down
into
a
spiral
walkway
and
creates
a
gorgeous
 ea=ng
venue.
The
courtyard
not
only
had
a
gorgeous
aesthe=c,
but
also
made
a
great
public
space
 that
was
completely
packed
with
people
sing
and
talking
even
though
it
was
past
lunch=me.

It
 seemed
that
almost
every
courtyard
or
public
area
with
chairs
was
mostly
vacant
was
we
walked
 through
them
besides
the
California
Plaza,
which
had
a
nice
loca=on
that
was
easy
to
get
to
and
 created
a
nice
environment
to
sit
and
chat
or
eat
in.

 •  The
Bunker
Hill
Steps
were
built
by
Lawrence
Halprin
and
were
designed
to
look
like
the
Spanish
 Steps
in
Rome.

However,
these
steps
in
Los
Angeles
are
only
used
to
go
up
and
down
on
and
in
 Rome
these
steps
would
usually
have
tons
of
people
sing
on
them
people
watching,
ea=ng
or
 talking
with
friends.

The
Spanish
Steps
in
Rome
are
used
as
a
gathering
place
instead
of
a
 connec=ve
path
from
one
place
to
another
like
in
the
Bunker
Hill
Steps
in
Los
Angeles.


  • 18. Image
of
Los
Angeles
Today
 •  The
‘Image
of
LA
City’
has
changed
a
lot
because
of
the
new
developments
in
the
downtown
area,
 but
most
of
the
historical
landmarks
have
stayed
the
same
and
are
just
being
refurbished.

 Therefore,
I
feel
that
most
of
the
landmarks
have
not
changed,
but
that
new
dis=nct
landmarks
 have
been
added,
which
help
people
to
beSer
get
around
Los
Angeles.

However,
I
do
believe
that
 Los
Angeles
is
con=nuing
to
change
and
is
in
the
process
of
redesigning
its
built
environment
and
 making
the
districts
flow
more
into
each
other
and
more
accessible
to
pedestrians,
instead
of
being
 dominated
by
cars.

I
felt
like
when
Lynch
went
on
walking
tours
with
people,
the
people
he
studied
 felt
disoriented
because
they
had
not
really
walked
on
the
sidewalks
and
that
the
cars
mostly
 dominated
the
streets
like
today.

However,
I
feel
that
there
is
a
change
happening
where
 sustainability
is
becoming
popular
and
that
communi=es
are
being
redeveloped
to
be
pedestrian
 orientated,
so
there
is
an
increase
in
pedestrian
traffic.

However,
there
needs
to
be
more
 accessible
places
for
the
pedestrians
and
make
connec=ve
paths
for
them
to
enter
and
exit
these
 landmarks
and
districts.

I
feel
that
the
districts
used
to
have
dis=nct
ridged
edges,
but
today
these
 edges
are
beginning
to
fade
and
become
grey
area,
since
Los
Angeles
can
no
longer
build
outward
 and
therefore
is
redeveloping
the
current
build
environment
with
infill
development.

Therefore,
 the
edges
are
becoming
blurred
and
the
paths
are
being
redeveloped
to
account
for
pedestrians
as
 well
as
more
landmarks
are
being
built
to
aSract
more
people
and
make
the
built
environment
 more
aSrac=ve
to
people.

The
districts
will
always
be
prominent
and
dis=nct;
however,
they
may
 begin
to
blend
into
each
other
on
the
edges,
but
this
will
just
help
to
connect
all
of
the
different
 areas
to
each
other
to
make
Los
Angeles
more
of
a
whole
instead
of
individual
centers.



  • 19. 
 By Peter Koehler
  • 20. By Peter Koehler

  • 21. By Peter Koehler!
  • 22. 
 By Peter Koehler
  • 23. Features that Stood Out to Me 
 •  The contrast between the old buildings and classic ambiance versus the new environment of the more modern downtown. ! •  The number of open lots that were dedicated to surface level parking, it seemed unusually high for a downtown. ! •  Santee Alley -- a makeshift built environment that reflected the vendors and the items being sold.! •  The high number of vendors at street level, on the ground floor of high office buildings.! •  The scale of the neighborhood. Wide streets, tall buildings, long avenues … downtown has an unmistakable grandiosity. ! By Peter Koehler!
  • 24. The Image of Los Angeles. Past, Present, Future 
 Since Kevin Lynch wrote about the Image of Los Angeles in 1960, a few things have changed, although not all that much in the scheme of things. Lynch describes downtown as being a business center that people knew not through residence but by traveling to for work or shopping. Although that is still largely true today, it has been revitalized as a viable place to live with the expansion of high end condominium and apartment buildings in the neighborhood. Lynch also noted that Pershing square was the most strongest element of all, and that does not seem to be the case today. I figure it would likely be L.A. Live area or perhaps the Disney Hall area. ! “When asked to describe or symbolize the city as a whole, the subjects used certain words: ‘spread out.’ ‘spacious,’ ‘formless,’ ‘without centers.’” Descriptions of the subjects commutes became less vivid as they approached downtown -- it think that may be different today, as downtown has added a lot of interesting looking buildings and landmarks.
 By Peter Koehler!
  • 25. Walking
Tour
Assignment

  • 26. Pictures

  • 27. 5

Things
That
Stood
Out
To
Me
 1.  Picture
1:
The
two
women
ea=ng
lunch
on
steps
outside
stood
out
 to
me
because
it
is
not
seen
o9en
in
LA
and
it
is
very
European.

I
 like
the
idea
of
ea=ng
lunch
this
way.
 2.  
Picture
2:
Disney
Hall
stood
out
to
me
because
of
the
structure
of
 the
building
and
how
it
was
build.

Very
unusual
and
modern.


 3.  
Picture
3:
The
cable
car
that
is
no
longer
opera=ng:
I
just
could
 not
believe
that
two
people
died
from
the
cable
car
crash.
 4.  
Picture
4:
LA
Times
Building:
It
looked
like
very
old
architecture.
 5.  
Picture
5:
Art:
There
was
art
everywhere
we
went.

From
a
man
 playing
the
saxophone,
to
what
is
shown
in
picture
5.


  • 28. Image
of
the
City
 •  In
the
book,
Lunch
studied
downtown
LA,
and
ever
since
he
wrote
 the
book
about
50
years
ago,
it
is
more
than
evident
that
 downtown
has
undergone
a
lot
of
change,
and
I
am
sure
that
this
 change
will
con=nue
happening
in
the
next
few
decades.

The
new
 developments
of
Downtown
have
made
Downtown
a
more
 aSrac=ve
place
to
be,
with
the
Jewelery,
Fashion,
and
Business
 districts.

The
districts
are
clearly
separated
by
atmosphere
and
 even
by
signs
posted.

The
districts
are
very
dis=nc=ve
from
one
 another,
not
only
from
how
clean
or
dirty
the
area
is,
but
from
the
 people
that
are
spending
their
=me
in
those
areas.

IN
50
YEARS:
I
 think
that
the
more
reconstruc=on
and
development
there
is,
the
 more
people
will
want
to
visit
and
even
live
in
Downtown
LA.

I
 think
it
has
and
slowly
will
even
more
begin
to
resemble
New
York
 City‐
an
area
where
a
car
is
not
always
needed,
where
walking
to
 and
from
a
des=na=on
is
possible.