Open                  Youth workAspects, challenges andopportunitiesin today’s                       Miriam TeumaEurope   ...
What is open youth work?• A Parneship study identified the following actions as  being the central fields of youth work in...
Lauritzen’s definition of Youth workThe main objective of youth work is to provide opportunities   for young people to sha...
The same study defines openyouth work as an activity which.......provides a space (e.g. youth centre or youth club) which ...
SO...What is open youth workIs open youth work then merely a  particular aspect or dimension  of youth work or does it con...
Internal values of Open Youth Work• Voluntary and informal – open youth work is based on  freedom to participate and innov...
Internal challenges to open youth work• Historically and socially outmoded• Time and location bound• Vague in aims and obj...
External challenges to open youth work• The information society: the virtual world and the  living world• Specialisation a...
EU youth policy:               challenges and opportunities                   for open youth workRenewed framework for Eur...
Renewed Framework for          European cooperation• Main fields of action   –   Education and training   –   Employment a...
Renewed framework for           European cooperation(i) Work cycles of 3 years duration(ii) Priorities: For each of these ...
Where does youth work figure in         the framework?Under this framework of cooperation, supporting and  developing yout...
Where does youth work figure in       the framework?– Apart from this, youth work is only  mentioned 3 times in the main t...
Fields of Actions Education/Health/Social InclusionInitiatives by Member States and the  Commission• Support the developme...
Field of Action                Youth and the WorldInitiatives by Member States and the Commission•     Raise the awareness...
First Cycle of implementation of      Framework 2010-2013– Jan 2010- June 2011: Priority - youth  employment  • Spanish Pr...
SpainPromoting education, training and non-formal learning in order to enhance   employability by improving young peoples ...
First Cycle of implementation of       Framework 2010-2013– Jul 2011- Dec 2012: Priority - youth  participation in democra...
PolandWith a view to the future partnerships, there is a need to take into account the   strengthening of young people’s m...
Belgium•   Promote different kinds of sustainable support for youth work, e.g. sufficient    funding, resources or infrast...
The future of Open Youth Work• In light of internal and external challenges and EU  policy priorities , do we accept open ...
If so, what might we do?• Professional ethic, competence and development• Qualify Standards and continuous quality  improv...
Youth Work in MaltaAgenzija Zghazagh (National Youth Agency): role and  aspirations• Profession development: Youth and Com...
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Miriam Teuma: Professional Open Youth Work – incl. an overview about the situation of youth work in Europe

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  • 5. Under this framework of cooperation, supporting and developing youth work should beregarded as cross-sectoral issues. Youth work is a broad term covering a large scope ofactivities of a social, cultural, educational or political nature both by, with and for youngpeople. Increasingly, such activities also include sport and services for young people. Youthwork belongs to the area of "out-of-school" education, as well as specific leisure timeactivities managed by professional or voluntary youth workers and youth leaders and is basedon non-formal learning processes and on voluntary participation. The ways in which youthwork can contribute to achieving the overall objectives identified above - as well as besupported and recognised as an added value for its economic and social contribution - shouldbe further examined and discussed under this framework. Among the issues to be discussedare: appropriate training for youth workers and leaders, the recognition of their skills using theappropriate European instruments, support for the mobility of youth workers and leaders andthe promotion of innovative services and approaches for youth work.
  • 5. Under this framework of cooperation, supporting and developing youth work should beregarded as cross-sectoral issues. Youth work is a broad term covering a large scope ofactivities of a social, cultural, educational or political nature both by, with and for youngpeople. Increasingly, such activities also include sport and services for young people. Youthwork belongs to the area of "out-of-school" education, as well as specific leisure timeactivities managed by professional or voluntary youth workers and youth leaders and is basedon non-formal learning processes and on voluntary participation. The ways in which youthwork can contribute to achieving the overall objectives identified above - as well as besupported and recognised as an added value for its economic and social contribution - shouldbe further examined and discussed under this framework. Among the issues to be discussedare: appropriate training for youth workers and leaders, the recognition of their skills using theappropriate European instruments, support for the mobility of youth workers and leaders andthe promotion of innovative services and approaches for youth work.
  • Miriam Teuma: Professional Open Youth Work – incl. an overview about the situation of youth work in Europe

    1. 1. Open Youth workAspects, challenges andopportunitiesin today’s Miriam TeumaEurope CEO Agenzija Zghazagh
    2. 2. What is open youth work?• A Parneship study identified the following actions as being the central fields of youth work in twenty European countries surveyed: – Extracurricular youth education – International youth work – Open youth work – Participation and peer education – Prevention of social exclusion/youth social work – Recreation – Youth counselling – Youth information – Youth work in sports – Faith based youth work
    3. 3. Lauritzen’s definition of Youth workThe main objective of youth work is to provide opportunities for young people to shape their own futures.Youth work is a summary expression for activities with and for young people of a social, cultural, educational or political nature.Youth work belongs to the domain of ‘out-of school’ education, most commonly referred to as non-formal education.It belongs both to the social welfare and to the educational systems.
    4. 4. The same study defines openyouth work as an activity which.......provides a space (e.g. youth centre or youth club) which is in principal open to all young people from the local community or territory. In most cases, the space (and the time, i.e. programme) is only partly pre-structured by youth workers and is supposed to be actively appropriated by the young people themselves. Leisure time activities cover a large part of open youth work, but they are also the context in which other social and educational tasks (also for marginalised groups) and outreaching activities are carried out.
    5. 5. SO...What is open youth workIs open youth work then merely a particular aspect or dimension of youth work or does it contain within it the capacity and potential to incorporate other aspects and dimensions such as: participation, empowerment, pe er learning, prevention of social exclusion, youth counselling and youth information?
    6. 6. Internal values of Open Youth Work• Voluntary and informal – open youth work is based on freedom to participate and innovate• Inclusive – open youth work includes all regardless of gender, ethnicity and economic status• Holistic – open youth work address the uniqueness of the individual• Developmental – open youth work aims to develop the whole individual• Relational and cooperative – open youth work is based on active and cooperative human relationships• Transformative – open youth work aspires to social change
    7. 7. Internal challenges to open youth work• Historically and socially outmoded• Time and location bound• Vague in aims and objectives• Lack of methodology and coherent structures• Lack of capacity in meeting young people’s needs and aspirations• Lack of professional competence• Difficult to quantifying outcomes
    8. 8. External challenges to open youth work• The information society: the virtual world and the living world• Specialisation and segmentation: behaviours, ethnicity, gender, social status, economic status• Regulation and standardisation: formal education and non-formal and informal learning• Professionalisation: ethic and competence; professionals and volunteers• Human rights, welfare and inclusion: legal beings, social beings and human beings
    9. 9. EU youth policy: challenges and opportunities for open youth workRenewed framework for European cooperation in theyouth field 2010-2018• Overall objectives: (i) create more and equal opportunities for all young people in education and in the labour market (ii) promote the active citizenship, social inclusion and solidarity of all young people.• To be achieved by: (i) specific targeted initiatives in the youth field - non-formal learning, participation, voluntary activities, youth work, mobility and information; and (ii) mainstreaming initiatives - i.e. initiatives to enable a cross-sectoral approach when implementing policies and actions in other policy fields which have a significant impact on the lives of young people.
    10. 10. Renewed Framework for European cooperation• Main fields of action – Education and training – Employment and entrepreneurship – Health and well-being – Participation – Voluntary activities – Social inclusion – Youth and the world – Creativity and culture
    11. 11. Renewed framework for European cooperation(i) Work cycles of 3 years duration(ii) Priorities: For each of these cycles, a number of priorities for European cooperation will be chosen which contribute to the fields of action(iii) Implementation instruments: – Knowledge building and evidence-based youth policy – Mutual learning – Progress reporting – Dissemination of results – Monitoring of progress – Structured Dialogue with young people and youth organisations – Mobilisation of EU Programmes and Funds
    12. 12. Where does youth work figure in the framework?Under this framework of cooperation, supporting and developing youth work should be regarded as cross- sectoral issues. Youth work is a broad term covering a large scope of activities of a social, cultural, educational or political nature both by, with and for young people. Increasingly, such activities also include sport and services for young people. Youth work belongs to the area of "out-of-school" education, as well as specific leisure time activities managed by professional or voluntary youth workers and youth leaders and is based on non-formal learning processes and on voluntary participation.
    13. 13. Where does youth work figure in the framework?– Apart from this, youth work is only mentioned 3 times in the main text and in 4 of the 8 fields of action: education and training; health and well-being; social inclusion; youth and the world; and creativity and culture .
    14. 14. Fields of Actions Education/Health/Social InclusionInitiatives by Member States and the Commission• Support the development of youth work and other non- formal learning opportunities as one of a range of actions to address early school leaving• Encourage healthy lifestyles for young people via physical education, education on nutrition, physical activity and collaboration between schools, youth workers, health professionals and sporting organisations.• Realise the full potential of youth work and youth centres as means of inclusion.
    15. 15. Field of Action Youth and the WorldInitiatives by Member States and the Commission• Raise the awareness of young people about global issues such as sustainable development and human rights,• Provide opportunities for young people to exchange views with policy-makers on global issues (e.g. via participation in international meetings, virtual platforms/forums, etc.),• Foster mutual understanding among young people from all over the world through dialogue and by means of supporting actions such as training courses, exchanges, and meetings,• Encourage young people to participate in ‘green volunteering’ and ‘green’ patterns of consumption and production (e.g. recycling, energy conservation, hybrid vehicles, etc.),• Promote entrepreneurship, employment, education and volunteering opportunities with regions outside of Europe,• Promote cooperation with, and exchanges between, those active in youth work on different continents,• Encourage young people to participate in development cooperation activities either in their country of residence or abroad.
    16. 16. First Cycle of implementation of Framework 2010-2013– Jan 2010- June 2011: Priority - youth employment • Spanish Presidency focussed on the active inclusion of young people: combating unemployment and poverty • Belgian Presidency focussed on Youth Work and the first European Resolution on Youth Work • Hungarian Presidency focussed on encouraging new and effective forms of participation of all young people and on the structured dialogue with young people on youth employment
    17. 17. SpainPromoting education, training and non-formal learning in order to enhance employability by improving young peoples knowledge, skills and competences, and ensuring that these are tailored to the needs of the changing labour market and the growing new employment sectors, by developing fair, flexible and efficient systems for high-quality education and training, as well as through non-formal learning and youth work, within the framework of a knowledge-based economy.HungaryYouth work and non-formal learning could be recognised and further supported as a significant source of support for equipping young people with skills and competences and thereby easing their access to the labour market........Improving key competences and media literacy of young people to enable them better to decode, use, influence and produce media is key to their being able to participate properly in democratic life. Both formal education systems and non-formal learning play an essential role here, and establishing further contacts between the two areas would therefore be beneficial for both sides. Youth work is important for imparting information and developing media literacy and e-skills in order to enhance effective participation.
    18. 18. First Cycle of implementation of Framework 2010-2013– Jul 2011- Dec 2012: Priority - youth participation in democratic life • Polish Presidency focussed on the Eastern dimension of youth participation and mobility • Danish Presidency focussed on fostering the creative and innovative potential of young people • The Cypriot Presidency focussed on participation and social inclusion of young people with emphasis on those with a migrant background
    19. 19. PolandWith a view to the future partnerships, there is a need to take into account the strengthening of young people’s mobility for learning mobility, including non-formal learning in another country, which can take such forms as youth work, including youth exchanges and voluntary activities; Denmarkyoung people’s active engagement in society e.g. through youth work, voluntary activities and civic organisations can harness their creativity and innovative capacity.....;support young people’s creativity, innovative capacity and talent aiming at ensuring sufficient opportunities for personal and social development through non-formal and informal learning, voluntary activities, active citizenship, intercultural cooperation and youth work;Cypruspromote youth work and youth policy, which can enhance active participation, social inclusion, solidarity and intercultural dialogue of young people, leading to the acceptance of the growing diversity among all young people; develop innovative methods to carry out youth work in areas where young people meet;promote the personal development and well-being of all young people, through youth work opportunities, so that they can realise their potential and become active and engaged members of society;
    20. 20. Belgium• Promote different kinds of sustainable support for youth work, e.g. sufficient funding, resources or infrastructure.• Enhance the quality of youth work, the capacity building and competence development of youth workers and youth leaders and the recognition of non-formal learning in youth work, by providing learning mobility experiences for youth workers and youth leaders.• Identify different forms of youth work, competences and methods that youth workers and youth leaders share, in order to develop strategies for enhancing the quality and recognition of youth work.• Recognise the crucial role of youth work as a provider of non-formal learning opportunities to all young people,
    21. 21. The future of Open Youth Work• In light of internal and external challenges and EU policy priorities , do we accept open youth work as: – An aspect/dimension, among many, of youth service provision – A support intervention for other policy areas e.g. education, employment, health – A refuge for failures in other policy areas• Or do we assert : – The values of youth work – Its capacity and potential for making an invaluable contribution to the lives and future of young people and the well-being of society – Its ability to do what no other policy area can do
    22. 22. If so, what might we do?• Professional ethic, competence and development• Qualify Standards and continuous quality improvement• Empowerment of young people through ongoing dialogue and active participation• New spaces for active engagement with young people and relational development and for interfacing and cooperating with other policy areas• Discovering more about young people’s lives
    23. 23. Youth Work in MaltaAgenzija Zghazagh (National Youth Agency): role and aspirations• Profession development: Youth and Community Studies; Maltese Association of Youth Workers; Youth Work Profession Bill; Youth Activity Centres• Quality Standards and their development• Empowerment programme for young people; local youth councils , art, music, theatre, media• New Spaces and interacting with other policy areas: youth cafes, hubs, youth information, kellimni.com,• Discovery: Young people’s perceptions of themselves, their families, communities and society
    24. 24. Where is Snoopy?

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