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  • 1. 1 Page
  • 2. Innovative practices for projects to build sustainable enterprisesJagjit Duggal – Senior Project Manager, Infosys Limited
  • 3. Contents 1. Abstract ........................................................................................................................................... 4 2. Introduction...................................................................................................................................... 4 3. Best Practices ................................................................................................................................. 5 3.1 Proven quality methodologies and principles ............................................................................ 5 3.1.1 Six Sigma Approach .............................................................................................................. 5 3.1.2 Lean Approach ...................................................................................................................... 6 3.1.3 Miscelleneous ........................................................................................................................ 6 3.2 Effective Knowledge Management............................................................................................ 6 3.2.1 KM Model embedded in project planning .............................................................................. 7 3.2.2 KM as a habit ........................................................................................................................ 7 3.2.3 Effective use of KM Tools ..................................................................................................... 8 3.2.4 Reuse and Tools deployment ............................................................................................... 9 3.3 Collaborative Innovation with Customer.................................................................................... 9 3.3.1 “One Team” Mindset ........................................................................................................... 10 3.3.2 Proactive Research ............................................................................................................. 11 3.3.3 Joint effort towards future roadmap .................................................................................... 11 3.3.4 Co-Innovate and Co-Build ................................................................................................... 11 3.3.5 Pitfalls .................................................................................................................................. 11 3.4 Inculcate “Innovation as a habit” ............................................................................................. 12 3.4.1 Framework to encourage innovation ................................................................................... 12 3.4.2 Regular brainstorming ......................................................................................................... 12 3.4.3 Lead by example ................................................................................................................. 12 3.4.4 Rewards and Recognition mechanism ................................................................................ 12 3.4.5 Risk taking capabilities ........................................................................................................ 13 3.4.6 Continuous innovation at project level ................................................................................ 13 3.4.7 Barriers ................................................................................................................................ 14 4. Results .......................................................................................................................................... 14 5. Glossary of Terms used ................................................................................................................ 15 6. References .................................................................................................................................... 15 7. Author‟s Profile .............................................................................................................................. 163 Page
  • 4. 1. AbstractWe all hear about many buzz words today like Green IT, Sustainability, Predictability, Profitability andInnovation. On a closer look, we may find them linked to a common mission of optimizing theoperations and processes within the organization by cutting down the unnecessary costs/wastes andcreating a sustainable business environment for tomorrow.In a purely business imperative, Organizational Sustainability is perceived by stakeholders not only interms of continuous revenue/profitability growth of the global organization, but also in terms of thesustenance of the achieved growth and profitability for many, many years to come in spite of all thechallenges. Repeat business from existing Customers plays a key role in sustaining the businessgrowth. Fact is that most of the successful global organizations boast of getting more than 80-90% oftheir business as repeat business from their existing Customers. That has been possible throughcontinuous Customer Satisfaction and Loyalty.Keeping this goal in mind, it becomes extremely important for the Project Manager (PM) to deployvarious innovative practices in the project to optimize the processes, achieve the effort/time/costsaving, increase the productivity and deliver value to Customer. PM also needs to build “innovation”mindset in the team in order to add extra value to the Customer and showcase a differentiation ascompared to the competitors. That leads to improved customer satisfaction/loyalty and thus thebusiness growth.This paper talks about various innovative techniques and best practices which a PM can deploy in theproject keeping the ultimate goal of sustained business growth in mind. The best practices talked hereare based on author‟s experience while handling multiple IT projects as a part of a critical program foran esteemed Customer. These innovative practices contributed to build great Customer confidenceon project team‟s capability to collaborate with them and collectively create sustainable businessenvironment.2. IntroductionAn example of sustainability is the mind-blowing green IT statistic from Intel. It estimates that the 1billion PCs in place worldwide in 2007 used 320 tera-watt-hours (twh) of electricity that year. But by2014, when the install base will have doubled to 2 billion PCs; they will use half the energy (151 twh)while delivering 17 times the computing capability.As depicted from the above example, focus of sustainability is on i) continuously deliver more and ii)at a continuously reduced cost. In today‟s competitive environment, Customers expect lot of value-add from their vendors at a continuously reduced cost of delivery/execution of the projects to havebetter value for money. Today sustainability is talked both in terms of how the companies are cleaningup their own practices/processes to become sustainable, and also what they are doing to help theircustomers become more sustainable.Vendor organizations can sustain their relationship with the Customer for long term only if they canshowcase continuous differentiation to the Customer. Today, Vendors are under tremendouspressure to cut down the total cost of the project while keeping their own margins intact. For example,on completion of three years of association in a critical program, Customer started asking for4 Page
  • 5. discounts on all future projects citing the reason that by now the project team is expert insystems/processes and also that another competitor Vendor is ready to do the same job at 30%lesser cost. To remain in business, this request had to be accepted but the margins were sustainedinternally with the help of productivity improvement and effort saving techniques deployed in theproject.3. Best Practices3.1 Proven quality methodologies and principlesProject Managers can leverage various statistical modeling and analysis techniques along withvarious tried and tested Quality methodologies in their projects. Few of them to name are Six Sigma,Lean, TQM, CMMi and Predictive Modeling. All these techniques can help in process improvementand can result in effort saving in projects leading to direct and indirect revenue savings and growth.Six Sigma fits well in the scenarios where the problem is known but the solution is unknown whereasLean applies well in the scenarios where both the problem and solution are known and it is a matterof finding the wastes from existing process and eliminating them. Six Sigma is applied for the caseswhere there is a need to drill down into the problem statement, associated causes, find out andimplement the possible solutions and monitor the results through various statistical techniques. Leanis a thinner version of Six Sigma and takes lesser time and effort to implement.3.1.1 Six Sigma ApproachSix Sigma methodology focuses on the implementation of a measurement-based strategy focused onprocess improvement and variation reduction through the DMAIC and DMADV sub-methodologies.DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control) is an improvement process for existingprocesses and DMADV (define, measure, analyze, design, verify) is an improvement process todevelop new processes or products. Both Six Sigma processes are executed by Six Sigma Green,Black Belts.According to the Six Sigma Academy, Black Belts save companies approximately $230,000 perproject. General Electric has estimated benefits on the order of $10 billion during the first five years ofSix Sigma implementation. Most of the leading organizations all over the world have developedproprietary frameworks for implementing Six Sigma methodologies and tools. Project Managers canmake use of the organizational six-sigma frameworks to resolve many of the problem statements.Examples:1. A Six Sigma initiative executed in one of my programs lead to 25% increase in RPP (Revenue Productivity per Person) over a period of one year.2. In another Six Sigma initiative, Testing Productivity was improved by 12% and Setup/Appreciation effort was reduced by 15% over a span of 8 months.3. Some other examples of potential business statements addressable through usage of Six Sigma frameworks are reduction of schedule and effort over-run, improvement in operating margin, resource utilization and productivity, number of bugs, Cost of Quality or service level agreement (SLA) adherence.5 Page
  • 6. 3.1.2 Lean ApproachLean is a technique that focuses on continuous improvement by eliminating all forms of wastes(resources, time and effort) in the production process so that all activities/tasks in the process addvalue to the product or service from the customer‟s perspective. That results in shorter cycle anddelivery times, higher quality and lower costs.During the implementation of the Lean initiatives in projects, the wastes are identified in the existingprocesses in the form of Pure Wastes, Partial Wastes and Non-Wastes. Project team then focuses oncomplete elimination of pure waste activities and fine-tuning of the partial waste activities. That resultsin more efficient processes and direct saving in time, effort, energy and hence reduces the revenueleakage.Examples:1. One of the examples of a Lean implementation implemented by me earlier is “60% reduction of on- boarding time of new joiners” into the project from 18 days per person to 7 days per person. That helped the project team to realize additional revenue USD 1 million over a period of one year in addition to multiple soft benefits like 33% increase in trainees satisfaction, value-adds to Customer in the form of improved training materials and CBTs and the capability of the project team to quickly ramp-up the new joiners.2. Lean can help in addressing many process flaws in IT industry like Building of non-required features in the IT system, Wait time due to dependency between tasks, Code rework due to last minute changes, Unnecessary IT systems hardware and licenses inventory, code defects due to missed Customer requirements.3.1.3 MiscelleneousThere are many more proven quality methodologies, tools and techniques using which ProjectManagers can deliver multiple values-add to Customers and their own organizations.Examples:1. One such example is Predictive Modeling technique which uses predictive modeling and analytics of operational data to create a statistical model, which can help in forecasting process behavior and better decision making. This can be used in various scenarios e.g. Optimized Team Loading in a support project with stringent SLA requirements based on the analysis of arrival rate of requests/week, requests classification and statistical data of effort/skills required for various kinds of requests.2. There are many more quality Frameworks like Total Quality Management (TQM), Capability Maturity Model/Capability Maturity Model integration (CMM/CMMi), Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) along with quality Tools like Check sheet, Pareto Chart, Histogram, Cause and Effect diagram, Scatter Diagram, Control Charts, Flow Charts, Failure Mode and Effect Analysis, „5‟-Why Analysis, Matrix Diagram and Prioritization Matrix etc which can really help the Project Managers in efficient operations of their projects and deliver value-add to their Customers.3.2 Effective Knowledge ManagementAs per Wikipedia definition, Knowledge Management (KM) comprises of a collection of strategies,practices and processes used to identify, create, represent, distribute and utilize the knowledge andexperience of individuals or organizations. Effective KM is one of the hottest buzz words today for theorganizations to improve performance, productivity and competitive advantage. Most of the large6 Page
  • 7. organizations have dedicated teams working on internal KM frameworks to support the project teamsin effective KM.For projects, KM is not only the basic hygiene factor today but has also become an essential strategyto achieve the organizational objectives of productivity improvement and delivering value-add to thecustomers. In most of the RFP and other business proposals today, the Vendors winning the dealsare the ones who are able to showcase the existing Tools, Reusable components/frameworks,relevant earlier experiences and most importantly the higher productivity of their people which givesthem an edge to deliver the projects in lesser time and cost. All this is managed through theorganizational KM models implemented at the project levels along with other innovative KM bestpractices in projects.In below paragraphs, I have listed few of the KM best practices which resulted in great yield in myprojects.3.2.1 KM Model embedded in project planningA KM Anchor is identified for the project at the project start itself. Team brainstorms to finalize the KMfocus areas along with laying a KM Scorecard and individual/team targets. The team/individualscorecard is updated and monitored on regular intervals vis-à-vis identified project goals. A snapshotof sample KM scorecard is shown in Figure 1. Figure 1: Snapshot of a sample KM Scorecard3.2.2 KM as a habitThe KM hygiene practices should be weaved in the basic project curriculum itself and PM along withKM Anchor for the project can focus to develop this as a habit in team members rather than a burdenof an additional task. Some of the tips and techniques to support this are: Central KM Tips Repository can be created for the project in which all team members can submit their new findings as and when learnt. These tips in crisp format can later be circulated to the team at a regular frequency (we used to call it as KM Capsule in our team!) to help them save time and effort in their tasks without needing to spend any additional time to learn these tips and tricks.7 Page
  • 8. Central KM Portal existing at the organization level or specifically created for the project can really help in effective knowledge management for the project. The portal should provide the mechanisms like knowledge artifacts submission, management (review, ratings etc) and search, on-line discussion forums and blogs, professional networking platforms etc to ease up the day-to- day work of projects teams. This should be backed by appropriate rewards and acknowledgement mechanisms to reap best benefits. Cross Module Sessions can be planned as a regular exercise where teams working on logical modules share their learning and findings with the other team members. That helps in creating backup persons for critical modules/skillsets within the project and can avoid dependency risk. Build capability for future by giving continuous learning opportunities to the team on core competencies, latest trends and technology focus areas These initiatives help keep the talent pool up to date and more relevant to the client‟s future business needs. Build and Showcase Lateral thinking through the focus on writing white papers, filing of patents etc. The branding achieved through this can lead to enhanced Customer confidence for the current and forthcoming projects thus leading to business value creation. Create reusable artifacts on critical processes/tasks and make them easily accessible to team members in a central repository again to eliminate the people dependency and achieve better efficiency. Add Fun element and Relevance to the KM tasks to the extent possible through innovative ways like making use of cartoons, pictorial representation etc with which people should be keen on attempting various KM practices.Examples: These KM practices can deliver great value to projects and hence the Customer. Someexamples:1. Effective KM strategies to build backup of critical knowledge artifacts/skillset helped us manage two attrition cases within one month in one of the critical modules of the project with no negative business impact. That led to Customer appreciations and also acknowledged in Customer Satisfaction Survey for project.2. Initiative on upfront identification and capability building on strategic future technology areas of interest for the Customer helped us staff additional opportunities totaling to USD 500K in one year duration.3.2.3 Effective use of KM ToolsPMs can make effective use of various KM Tools like Team Wiki pages for quick and easymanagement of relevant KM contents for the team along with easy accessibility, Tips ManagementSystem (TMS) for maintaining an easily accessible tips/tricks repository, SharePoint based Issuesrepository portal along with search facility, Tech/Expert Forums, Blogs etc. The return oninvestment is usually very high due to “deploy once, use repeatedly” nature of these tools. Innovativepractices can further ease up the KM effort.Examples:1. In one of my projects, we created a quick browser plugin to feed the KM tips and tricks directly to the individuals on their screen instead of botheration for circulation and specifically read by users over mails.2. Two days effort to configure the Team Wiki for the program helped the team in a long way and lead up to 10% productivity improvement in few of the critical modules of the project. Team Wiki8 Page
  • 9. helped the team in sharing of across modules learning, best practices, easily accessible solution repository of critical issues and made experts help available across locations within the geographical spread team.3.2.4 Reuse and Tools deploymentThis is one of the most effective strategies for Project Managers to improve productivity of theirteams. Reuse strategy needs two-dimensional focus. One - regularly creating and keeping handy reference for various reusable components in a project or organization level repository easily accessible to all team members. Second - awareness of the available components and making use of them in the projects to deliver faster. Tools strategy again needs two-dimensional focus. One - for keeping an eye on the opportunities for automation for manual and time consuming tasks especially of repetitive nature through creation of various quick tools and utilities. Second – proactively understanding various standardized third-party or organizational tools available across SDLC phases, explore their fitment and deploy them to save effort.These strategies can really prove to be boon for the Project Managers to deliver the alreadyestimated work faster along with value-add to Customer and can also give competitive edge if kept inmind during estimation for newer projects/modules.Examples:1. One of our development teams used to use a text editor for the development of their Java Code which was a cumbersome muti-step process with no Java support directly available to the Developers within the editor. The same was replaced with a Java development open source IDE and lead to productivity improvement by up to 50% for most of the Developers.2. A task for fresh manual environment setup for one of the enterprise applications used to take around 3 days effort due to the manual error-prone, laborious and repetitive process. The same was automated through a quick tool created within the projects which lead to reduction of effort to less than 30 minutes per installation along with no manual/boring intervention from the person doing it.3.3 Collaborative Innovation with CustomerCollaborative Innovation is made up of two words: Collaboration + Innovation. This is one of thehottest themes today for building sustainable organizations and laying the foundation of nextgeneration enterprises. Collaborative innovation begins when companies come together with acollective vision to solve problems and/or develop customer-centric solutions that are beyond thescope, scale or capabilities of the individual companies.Initially the companies started building the global partners aiming lower costs and shared risks. But bynow they have realized that collaboration is a must-do need towards achieving most of the globalinnovations. It may be practically impossible for one organization to have skills, resources andthought leadership for all the elements of any innovation project. By partnering with other globalorganizations expert in their individual areas, each partner focuses on best excellence and thoughtleadership for their part of the innovation and helps in overall success of the initiative.9 Page
  • 10. Successful organizations are able to reach such higher levels of maturity in mutual collaboration withtheir Customers that they are perceived by their Customers as “Partners” rather than “Vendors”.These partners work together to build the future roadmap and business direction for the Customer byleveraging the best capabilities of both the parties.Examples: Few Industry examples of innovation through collaboration are:1. A large scale collaborative effort towards innovation in Boeing‟s development of its 787 “Dreamliner” aircraft, where the project included the collaboration of over 50 partners from over 130 global locations, working together for more than four years for leveraging advanced capabilities from their partner network.2. Another example is of Card Payments lifecycle which becomes a reality due to multiple partners coming together to take care of their role in the Payment life cycle. Most of the elements shown in Figure 2 are managed by specialized partners in each area who come together to make the quick and fast card payments process a reality without the user being aware of so many parties involved in processing each of the transaction. Figure 2: Snapshot of Payments LifecycleSome of the best practices which the Project Managers can implement at their project level to achievethe high levels of collaborative innovation are covered in below sections.3.3.1 “One Team” MindsetProject team should work with a goal to eventually create “One Team” mindset in the Customer. Thisis a time taking process and needs very good patience, dedication and determination from the PMand the team.But this is achievable especially in long duration projects through continuous endeavor from theproject team to achieve Customer delight through delivery excellence, value-add contributions, goingout of the way to resolve issues when needed and other innovative practices for repo/trust buildingwith the Customer. This level of relationship is the key to mutual free-flow of ideas, information,relevant data and work/experience thus opening the doors for many innovations.10 Page
  • 11. Few of the best practices at project level which can help in building great repo with Customer teamare: Regular Video Conferencing with Customer teams to ensure better mingling and connect. Team events covering both Customer and project teams. One such event we tried for a few of the projects was a joint Rendezvous event through which both Customer and Project teams got a chance to know each other better. Extend the capability building trainings/sessions from project team to Customer team too to deliver a value-add.3.3.2 Proactive ResearchProactive research both on latest applicable industry-wide business/technology trends and analysis ofshortcomings in existing systems, processes and business models along with suggestions forbetterment is another key initiative required for collaborative mindset. Project teams should keep aneye on inefficient processes and areas of improvement in the existing processes, tools and systemsof Customer. Further discussions for improvement with Customer may lead to newer projects forimprovement of identified areas.3.3.3 Joint effort towards future roadmapProject team should aim to partner with Customer to proactively understand about their businesschallenges and apply the existing expertise and offerings from their own organization to help theCustomer build the future roadmap. Relevant industry experts can also be brought on-board toprovide a consultancy on business and technology roadmap of the Customer based on the industry-wide best practices, latest technology trends and competitors play/direction/strategy in the associatedbusiness domain.The joint roadmap building exercise also gives a clear perspective on future needs of the Customer toproject team. That helps the project team to proactively build the relevant competencies and skillsetwithin the team to support the future roadmap items thus leading to a win-win situation for both theparties.3.3.4 Co-Innovate and Co-BuildBased on the analysis of market trends and joint roadmap, one of the best propositions for bothCustomer and project teams is to Co-Innovate and Co-Build. Global organizations have realizedtoday that Co-Innovation, Co-Build and Together-GTM are the success factors in today‟s volatileworld both in terms of leveraging best from partners and shared ownership of failure risk.3.3.5 PitfallsThere are some pitfalls too which the collaborating parties should keep a watch on: Integrity and Transparency among the partners. Risk perception management. Co-ordination failure. Dependability between parties. Associated costs of integration and monitoring. Boundary to be drawn to ensure data security for critical and confidential organizational data especially while partnering with the competitors itself.11 Page
  • 12. 3.4 Inculcate “Innovation as a habit”In the tough business environment, today innovation is the only route to gaining and sustainingcompetitive advantage. The organizations that are perceived innovative and reliable in their practices,products and strategies attract long term customer loyalty and thus a sustained business growth formany years. Such organizations embed innovation in their basic operational structure itself andnurture innovation as a habit in their employees.Google is an excellent example of an organization where its innovative efforts encourage real thinkingout of the box. Employees at Google devote 20 percent of their work time to special projects of theirown design within small technology teams. This inventive and effective policy has resulted in 50percent of Google‟s product offerings.Project Managers can also help their organization and clients to achieve their objectives of long termsustainability by ensuring good focus on innovation in their projects. Some of the important practicesto ensure continuous flow of innovation in projects are listed below.3.4.1 Framework to encourage innovationProject Manager can help in creating a strong innovation culture in the project. That involves takingvarious steps to create awareness among the team members on the long term business benefits ofinnovation in the project, encourage and appropriately reward innovative ideas coming from the teammembers and keeping enough bandwidth available for the individuals to contribute to the innovationinitiatives of the project and organization.Many innovations may lead to new inventions too. The inventions should be quickly tried andevaluated within the project/organization/Customer and based on the results should also be takenforward for IP protection through Patents, Copyrights, White papers etc. That helps to take theinnovation to next level by benefitting the wider audience and also in branding the inventingorganizations along with additional revenue for long term.3.4.2 Regular brainstormingRegular brainstorming on innovative ideas within the team keeping in mind the customer needs andultimate goal to save effort, improve productivity and deliver value-add to customer is anotherinitiative which the Project Managers can implement in their teams.It is believed that one idea can generate many more ideas through mind mapping patterns duringopen-minded brainstorming exercises. So people from varied skill and experience level within theteam should be encouraged to participate in these sessions. The art of project manager lies inlistening to proposed innovators and thoroughly evaluating the ideas coming from all innovators withsame level of respect and zeal without any criticism and prejudice.3.4.3 Lead by exampleProject Manager and other senior members of the team should lead from the front to innovate andimplement the innovative ideas for business benefit. Senior members of the team should also betrained to build a knack of identifying the potential innovation areas within the team, generalizing thework done and experience gained in the project to create the generic Service Offerings for taking tovarious Customers in future.3.4.4 Rewards and Recognition mechanismA strong R&R mechanism needs to be put in place to appropriately reward the individuals contributingto the innovation journey of the project. The amount of effort needed to contribute to the innovation12 Page
  • 13. initiatives can be quite high at times and may seem to be a burden or an additional task for the teammembers. R&R mechanism of the team helps mitigate this issue. Both monetary benefits and formalappreciation systems of the organizations can help here.3.4.5 Risk taking capabilitiesProject Managers looking for innovation in their projects need to have the appetite for experimentationand risk taking capabilities along with the determination to push through failure. The fact is that veryfew innovation projects are successful in this world.According to Stevens, G.A. and Burley, J., “3,000 Raw Ideas = 1 Commercial Success!” 3000 raw 100 10 2 Project 1 ideas Explored Developed Launches Commercial Ideas Ideas Success Figure 3: Idea Success Rate diagramBut that should not limit the innovation mind set. Even few successful innovations can change theworld.3.4.6 Continuous innovation at project levelInnovation does not always mean a new invention only. At project level, it also means making use ofvarious innovative tools, tips, techniques and other inventions already available within theorganization or in the external world which can result in benefits to the project/organization/Customer.Examples: Some examples to encourage project level innovation are listed below:1. Suggestion of Newer Engagement Models to Customer which can lead to win-win situation for both the project/organization and the Customer. E.g. After reaching the maturity level of an IT support project, Project Manager suggests per ticket based pricing model to the Customer instead of a Time & Material pricing model. That helps the Customer by taking away tasks like regular tracking of time/effort spent and skill levels of FTE deployed on the project, Optimum utilization of FTEs during varying frequency of tickets and leads to cost saving. Similarly it helps the project team to internally optimize the processes, skill level and number of FTEs deployment which results in better operations and thus higher project margins. This is a classic example of an innovative pricing model which leads to win-win situation for both the Customer and the Vendor organization.2. Reduction of infrastructure cost for Customer with the help of various Cloud Computing pricing models.3. Create generic reusable artifacts and service offerings on important business areas based on the experience gained during the project for later use.4. Stretch Assignments to enthusiasts in the project to make some of the identified innovations a reality.5. Deployment of many organizational or standardized third party tools for the benefit of the project as explained earlier in this document.6. Initiatives to connect the vision of senior management with junior members of the team like Quarterly Newsletters, Open Houses and Coffee with the Business head to build innovation mindset13 Page
  • 14. 3.4.7 BarriersThere are many barriers too while encouraging the innovation in the projects: Unfortunately a lot of good ideas get left in the trash. Not because they were not good ideas, but because at some point, somebody drew a line saying that this much is good enough; we cant afford any more. Summarily dismissing any new idea because "there is no requirement for this". In spite of all the efforts from the Project Manager to create awareness about the business need and usefulness of Innovation related efforts in the projects, few team members still feel that this is an additional effort and an extra burden. No bandwidth available for innovation initiatives because of overwhelm by day-to-day work. Difficult to change the comfort zone built with existing processes/products over many years. Delay in proceeding with next steps to realize the innovation can sometimes lead to failure due to a competitor bringing the same idea into market before you. Uncertainty about the end outcome and less risk taking capacity/willingness.4. ResultsThe innovative best practices and techniques recommended in the various sections of the abovepaper are based on the practical implementation of these practices in my program which helped usachieve the defined goal (refer section 3 of this paper, last paragraph for details). I will like tosubstantiate the benefits with the help of few relevant statistics from my program Refer Figures 4, 5,6, 7 and 8 below. Figure 4 Figure5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 814 Page
  • 15. Note: There are many more similar trends for improvement in DIR, Quality, Estimation Accuracy andeffort & Schedule Adherence etc which have been kept out of this document keeping the length of thepaper in mind.Few important highlights of above results are:1. Continuous focus on innovative techniques helped us achieve marvelous results in multiple areas i.e. continuous improvement in effort saving trends with final value of close to 10% overall effort saving over 9 months, before-time deliveries, 50% quality improvement with zero critical/major delivered defects, Phase-on-phase Productivity improvement and COQ, DIR reduction.2. 30-40% of the saved effort benefits over initial three years were passed to the Customer as a value-add by accommodating few of the change requests free-of-cost. Also direct billing discounts were given to the Customer from fourth year onwards based on the improved productivity.3. Remaining savings were leveraged within the organization to create generic reusable components, artifacts, tools, utilities etc for future use in similar projects. Additionally, it made it possible to rotate few senior talents in the program to staff other opportunities in the organization and also helped in managing individual aspirations of the talents.Delivered benefits lead to continuous improvement in the Customer Satisfaction survey score for theprogram. Improved Customer satisfaction also helped us grow the YoY revenue from the Customerup to 35% in the fourth year.5. Glossary of Terms used 1. PM - Project Manager 2. KM – Knowledge Management 3. RFP – Request for proposal 4. SDLC – Software Development Life Cycle 5. IDE – Integrated Development Environment 6. GTM – Go To Market 7. R&R – Rewards and Recognition 8. FTE – Full Time Employee6. References[1] http://blogs.forrester.com/, Chris Mines blog for Intel example in section 3 of the document above.[2] http://en.wikipedia.org, for definitions of few of the terms used above.[3] http://www.infosys.com/sustainability/, for more understanding of Sustainability from Infosysperspective.[4] http://www.isixsigma.com/ for reference to the list of Six Sigma tools.[5] www.managementexchange.com: Article by Dasarath Jayasinghe for “Industry examples ofinnovation through collaboration”.[6] Stevens, G.A. and Burley, J., (May/June 1997) Research Technology Management, Vol. 40, #3,pp. 16-27 for Idea Success Rate diagram.15 Page
  • 16. 7. Author’s Profile Jagjit Duggal is a PMP certified professional working as Senior Project Manager in Engineering Services unit at Infosys Limited, Chandigarh. He is an Instrumentation Engineer (Gold Medalist) by education from SLIET Punjab and has eleven years of IT Industry experience. He has handled varied set of projects across Banking, Retail, BI, CRM, Product Engineering domains and diverse technology lines throughout the career. He has published multiple articles and created various reusable components, tools and utilities within Infosys. He is also the author of one filed in Indian and US patent office recently. Email: Jagjit_Duggal@Infosys.com16 Page