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  • 1. 1 Page
  • 2. MANAGING VIRTUAL TEAMS – A GLOBALMARKETING PROGRAM MANAGER’SPERSPECTIVE Rashmi K - Marketing Manager, Hewlett Packard Ltd Sowmya Moni - Marketing Manager, Hewlett Packard Ltd Yamuna Padmanabhan - Marketing Manager, Hewlett Packard Ltd Abhishek RVRK Sharma - Marketing Manager, Hewlett Packard Ltd
  • 3. Contents1. Abstract ............................................................................................................................................ 42. Introduction...................................................................................................................................... 43. Research Methodology ................................................................................................................. 54. Research Findings ......................................................................................................................... 6 4.1 Marketing challenges for virtual teams ................................................................................. 6 4.2 Advantages of virtual teams ................................................................................................... 7 4.3 Important Work Dimensions in virtual teams ....................................................................... 75. Go-to- Market Program — New Product Launch Case Study ................................................ 76. Solution Framework ....................................................................................................................... 8 6.1 Global Virtual Governance Structure .................................................................................... 9 6.2 Role Task Methodology ........................................................................................................ 10 6.3 Consensus Building Process ............................................................................................... 11 6.4 Cross Cultural Communication Model ................................................................................ 127. Conclusion..................................................................................................................................... 148. Bibliography .................................................................................................................................. 149. Appendix 1 .................................................................................................................................... 1510. Appendix 2a ................................................................................................................................ 1611. Appendix 2b ................................................................................................................................ 1712. Appendix 2c ................................................................................................................................ 1813. Appendix 3 .................................................................................................................................. 1914. Author’s Profile ........................................................................................................................... 203 Page
  • 4. 1. Abstract"...you cannot build network organizations on electronic networks alone...If so,... we will probablyneed an entirely new sociology of organizations." Nohria & Eccles, 1992, pp. 304-305.The purpose of this paper is to present the challenges faced by marketing program managers andmake recommendations for effectively managing virtual teams working on global marketingprograms.Global marketing programs refer to marketing activities co-ordinated and integrated across multiplecountry markets to achieve a specific marketing outcome for an organization. Today, many globalfortune companies design marketing programs to drive key marketing outcomes such as improvingtime to market for launching new products globally, creating agility in product development life cycleto compete effectively in an environment, responding to competitor, industry changes and customerneeds etc. In such a program, core concepts such as value proposition building, product roadmapdefinition, marketing plan development, and communication strategy are developed at a global leveland implemented in countries. These programs are driven by virtual teams that usually comprisehybrid mix of location specific and diverse competencies.The advent of low cost, real-time collaboration communication technology has made it possible forteams divided by time and space to interact and contribute effectively. Not only does the marketingprogram manager needs to manage the triple constraints (time, scope and cost) but also needs tomanage challenges related to cross-cultural communication while ensuring consistency of onevoice in marketing planning and execution. There is also often a need to diagnose and handledifferences, challenge assumptions, and defuse the potential for conflict. The paper will detail thechallenges faced by marketing managers through few business cases.In order to successfully achieve the marketing outcome and overcome the challenges, marketingprogram managers need to manage a whole spectrum of communication strategies and projectmanagement techniques as well as human and social processes in ways that support the team.The authors will discuss their experiences and share best practices of effectively managing virtualteams — some of which include establishing a global virtual governance structure, building aculture for collaboration and formal consensus building process, and creating a role taskprioritization matrix and a cross-cultural relevant communication model for the virtual teamand its stakeholders.2. Introduction 1All projects have two core features – activities and decisions. Most challenges stem frommanaging these two features. All activities and decisions need to be effectively managed for1 New Product Development Decision-Making Effectiveness: Comparing Individuals, Face-To-Face Teams,and Virtual Teams, Schmidt et al., Decision Sciences, Volume 32 No. 4, Fall 20014 Page
  • 5. achieving project or program outcomes successfully. Managing marketing projects and programsare no different. The context of activities and decisions in marketing can be related to managing thecustomer journey (customer relationship management), developing the marketing strategy andplan, defining and launching products, and or management of the marketing mix. Authors, who areexperienced marketing managers, have managed several global marketing programs and havecollectively 25 years of managing and working in large globally distributed teams. This paperdiscusses aspects of virtual team management in marketing context.The authors conducted field study with the objective of determining the challenges and benefits ofmanaging and working in virtual marketing teams. The study was a mixed-methods approach togather quantitative and qualitative data using a Virtual Team Effectiveness Questionnaire, one-on-one interviews and a Go-to-Market marketing program case study. The authors conductedfew one-on-one interviews with several marketing leaders and project practitioners managingdiverse marketing projects across domains such as research/analytics and product marketinglaunches to learn perspectives on managing virtual teams. The insights gained from the interviewsand the authors’ collective experiendces were used in designing the questionnaire. Refer to theVirtual Team Effectiveness Questionnaire in Appendix 1 and Qualitative Interview Transcripts inAppendix 4. A correlation analysis was conducted on quantitative data, while qualitative data wasthemed and counted. The findings of the study have been discussed in detail in the paper. Authorshave also discussed the challenges of managing virtual team through a Go-to-Market case study ofa New Product Launch.Authors have provided a proven, actionable and suggestive solution framework to reduce therisks associated with challenges when working with culturally diverse virtual teams..3. Research MethodologyA short questionnaire was designed and administered online to 30 mid-senior level marketingmanagers working or managing large global programs across the organization. Questions in thesurvey focused on gaining insights from marketing managers on challenges and benefits whenworking in a virtual team.Respondents provided their responses on the perceived challenges pertaining to role/responsibilityof team members, cultural sensitivity, customer and market data acquisition, task prioritization,governance processes, communication, speed of decision making, cost effectiveness, efficacy ofoutput/deliverables and quality of work, in the survey. Questions on perceived benefits of working ina virtual teams were also included in the questionnaire and centered around improved time tocompletion for marketing planning and execution, clear and effective communication, time savedthrough faster decision making and real time collaboration facilitated in accelerating speed tomarket. Refer to the Virtual Team Effectiveness Questionnaire in Appendix 1.5 Page
  • 6. 4. Research FindingsIt was important to establish the role of the respondent as the survey responses to the perceivedchallenges and benefits in the questionnaire and interviews were role specific. The respondentchose the role most applicable — program/ project manager or a team contributor while respondingto the questions on the survey. The results of the survey brought out some interesting insights.Project managers and team contributors viewed challenges and benefits of working in virtual teamsdifferently. The research results are presented below, with interpretive statements with regard totheir results.4.1 Marketing challenges for virtual teams(Refer Appendix 2, Figure 1)It was surprising to find out that most of the respondents seem to corroborate authors’ views onchallenges and benefits in virtual teaming. Most marketing managers cited communication andgovernance related challenges more over other types of challenges. In a large globallydistributed organization, communication is presented as a significant challenge, unsurprisingly andperhaps compounded by high levels of cultural diversity within project teams that are spread acrossmultiple time zones. Additionally, there is stress on governance difficulties, indicating difficultieswith decision making and tracking of project progress. With multiple teams working together,the lack of clear definition of responsibility and task priority definition becomes a majorchallenge for virtual teams. The distances inherent to virtual teams make face to face collaborationdifficult, which helps resolve such issues in traditional teamsOne of the respondents quoted: ―Decision making structures are often not very clearly defined, asthe nature of virtual teaming means such structures would need to change often. With virtual teamsbeing created and dismantled frequently, it becomes difficult to maintain good governance in termsof decision making and communication. Another parameter that was of concern was taskprioritization. With virtual teams so geographically divided, regional biases sometimes emergingwithin the team with respect to task prioritization‖The use of Global Virtual Governance Structure has been seen to improve the incidence ofdefinition of realistic ideas and implementable solutions in culturally diverse virtual teams. It hasbeen noted that cultural diversity has both positive and negative implications for virtual team, thepositives stemming from improved decision making and idea generation, and the negatives from 2the challenges associated with intercultural communication . This has been discussed in detail inthe solution framework section of the paper.2 Shachaf, P. (2008). Cultural diversity and information and communication technology impacts on global virtual teams: Anexploratory study. Information and Management, 45(2), 131‐142.6 Page
  • 7. 4.2 Advantages of virtual teams(Refer Appendix 2, Figure 2)The two most significant advantages presented included the ease of exchange of informationdue to virtual communication capabilities and ease of access to Subject Matter Experts(SMEs) and data resources. The core advantages provided in the survey seem to gainreasonable amount of acceptance from the respondents, indicating that the perceived advantagesof virtual teams are common across most marketing programs. Faster decision making, improvedcompletion times for marketing planning and messaging are all represented advantages of virtualteaming.4.3 Important Work Dimensions in virtual teams(Refer Appendix 2, Figure 3)With respect to factors that are influenced by virtual teams, the most significant factor in movingtowards virtual teaming was that of cost savings. The use of virtual teams for a geographicallydispersed organization represents significant savings in terms of costs incurred for travel andexchange of information. Additionally, the efficiency and improved quality of work were seen asother advantages of virtual teaming, with the ease of information exchange and access toSubject Matter Experts (SMEs) across geographies.Qualitative interviews corroborated with the findings of the survey. Marketing managersmentioned that due to vast time differences across teams, it is challenging to coordinate tasks andensure goal alignment while keeping the availability of resources in different regions underconsideration necessitating some team members to work at odd hours. One of the biggestadvantages that virtual teams present for marketing is the work continuance to follow the sun,thus making sure that work progresses continually as it moves from team members from one timezone to another across the globe. The work allocation becomes easier as there is accessibility toglobal talent. The clear definition of marketing objectives and role task prioritization initiallygoes a long way in mitigating the risk in time and communication management.5. Go-to- Market Program — New Product Launch CaseStudyThe authors manage global technology product launches. Global launches are usually donesimultaneously across geographies and require co-ordination with multiple teams across functions.A diverse globally distributed team such as product engineering, planning, operations, delivery anddeployment works to plan and execute various aspects of a launch. The case study below focuseson marketing team’s involvement in launching an enterprise software product.Creating and managing the launch schedule is the single most critical responsibility of amarketing launch program manager.7 Page
  • 8. An enterprise software product upgrade was to be launched with 1000 global customers across 140countries. This product aimed at upgrading the Enterprise customers’ IT environment to the nextlevel. The objectives of the launch were to: Encourage at least 80% of the customers to migrate to the new product in the first wave of migration over 12 months Increase customer satisfaction levels by 30 % post migrationIt was imperative that sales, IT delivery managers and customers had access to marketingliterature to the new product earliest and latest finish of 8 and 6 weeks respectively before theproduct launch date. A virtual go-to-market team was put together to work on the marketingactivities pertaining to the launch and a launch program manager was assigned to the launch. Thelaunch schedule was planned for 10 weeks with 5 critical milestones that included approvalof project charter, release of value proposition and positioning statements, roll out of anintegrated communication plan and release of customer and sales facing marketingcollaterals. The program manager had to manage multiple teams with different functionalspecializations (marketing, product development, regional sales and delivery) from differentgeographies (Asia Pacific (APJ), Europe, the Middle East and Africa (EMEA), Americas).Being a global launch, all marketing content has to be translation ready. The prioritization oflanguages translations for marketing content, created several hurdles in meeting the criticalmilestones of the launch schedule. With a finite budget, and decision to translate all marketingcollateral in only 10 languages meant meeting with all concerned stakeholders and seekingconsensus. Consensus building requires trust and building relationships and trust in avirtual team is a significant challenge. The launch manager had to schedule many meetings forthese discussions. The deliberations did create conflict like situations within the core marketingteam. As a program manager, one had to be sensitive to time zones and work hours and thereforedo resource and task allocation in such a manner that the work is uninterrupted – famously referredto as the Follow the Sun approach! While the overall launch schedule was met on time which was(Latest Finish) 6 weeks before launch, 2 critical milestones were on critical path throughout theproject. Lessons learned from addressing ways to dealing with the challenges outlined above, havehelped in building some kind of defense mechanisms to counter risks of delays in managinglaunches.The solution framework provided below has been seen to improve the incidence of managing someof the known risks and success in managing culturally diverse virtual teams.6. Solution FrameworkWe have seen that challenges for managing a marketing team which is connected virtually aremany. However, from the authors’ perspective, the benefits of a virtually managed marketing teamfar outweigh the challenges. It has been observed that organizations which cater to the demands ofcross cultural markets, have an inherent opportunity to consolidate and connect the skills andexpertise of resources spread in strategic locations under a common umbrella for the achievementof marketing objectives. In such a scenario, the successful achievement of the marketing outcomes8 Page
  • 9. is the result of management of a whole spectrum of communication strategies and projectmanagement techniques as well as human and social processes in ways that support the team.Having observed the dynamics of successful virtually operational marketing organization, theauthors talk detail a solution framework from their collective experience of launchingproducts globally. This solution framework can be applied in principle to all marketing programs.The framework consists of the following components:1. Global Virtual Governance Structure2. Role Task Prioritization Matrix3. Consensus Building Process4. Cross Cultural Communication Model6.1 Global Virtual Governance StructureMost global marketing teams have a strong matrix organization structure. The challenge ofmanaging interpersonal relationships, communicating and monitoring the progress of a marketingprogram is managed by defining its Governance structure. A governance structure establishesthe strategic, operational, and technical decision-making process required to ensure marketingteams enable the organization to excel in its mission. Governance structures are mostly defined atleadership level such Marketing Council or Business Steering Committee with representation fromseveral functional teams working virtually across the globe. The leadership team consists ofrepresentatives from the top management of the company. Marketing budgets are owned by thisteam and they are the final approval and escalation point for all marketing programs. The topmanagement is assisted in governance and decision making by the Strategy and Executive teamswho align with the marketing objectives outlined by the Leadership team. Cross-team collaborationand prioritization decisions are formulated at this level. The Executive teams are also responsiblefor setting standards and driving governance guidance, which is necessary in order to sustain anenvironment of cohesion within virtual program teams working towards the achievement of themarketing objectives. Governance structure is also influenced by industry groups and otherbusiness functions (such as finance, legal etc) in the organization.Decisions making is facilitated by sharing information through multiple mediums of communicationsuch as team share sites, collaboration websites, virtual rooms, audio conferencing tools etc.These communication tools enable marketing teams working towards a complex marketingprogram such as product launch to collaborate and share information, negotiate and assessprogress of the program. In fact, many organizations in recent times have used thesecommunication platforms to launch products. The illustration below shows a formal Governancestructure for a launching a product globally across regions. The Launch Program manager interactswith several teams (product, regional marketing, country marketing, and engineering, globalsupport functions) which are geographically dispersed to launch a product. Whether it is customerrequirements gathering, product development, messaging, creating marketing outboundcommunication or co-coordinating the launch roll out, all of these activities are carried outseamlessly through virtual teaming.9 Page
  • 10. 1.0 Governance Structure6.2 Role Task MethodologyThe importance of role task prioritization can best be summarized through a sound bite from amarketing leader, the authors interviewed recently, “I have found that spending more time up frontensuring everyone is on the same page and knows who is doing what, is a very prudent investmentas the team can then execute against clearly defined goals with everyone pulling in the samedirection.”How does a marketing program manager keep tabs on who in the virtual team are responsible forwhat aspect of the launch program? The answer to the question lies in Role Task Prioritization.This involves defining and providing members of the marketing program clarity on the role andresponsibilities. Marketing program managers map the responsibilities of different virtual teams bycreating a program RACI. RACI — Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, Informed. In a virtualteam, where face to face interaction among the members is very low, a RACI provides a referencepoint for decision making and task assignments. Having a detailed program RACI reduces risks onconflicts and progression of the marketing program as per predefined schedules. The sample belowis a program RACI for global marketing product launch across countries. All the teams are virtuallywork together to launch the product.10 Page
  • 11. 2.0 Program RACI6.3 Consensus Building ProcessOne of the challenges in managing a virtual team is the varying degree of prioritizations andinvolvements existent within a program team. While managing marketing programs such aslaunches, launch Program Manager and his/her core team may have a high degree of involvementon all stages of launch, other teams such as country marketing teams participating in the launchmay have a relatively low degree of involvement in the launch process. Therefore, a formalconsensus building process needs to be initiated in order to manage the triple constraints oftime, cost and scope.In a virtual team, marketing program managers require consensus in order to: Develop clear understanding of the roles and responsibilities Arrive at an agreement on the turnaround time on the marketing deliverables11 Page
  • 12. Agree at convenient time to schedule update and clarification meetings among members of different time zones Develop an agreement on the content review process and toll gates Define success factors for marketing effectivenessConsensus building can be achieved by respecting different points of view, understanding workingstyles and gaining insights through focus group discussions, brainstorming sessions, meetings etc.The authors have observed certain working styles to work most effectively in a in a consensusseeking discussion and that can be categorized broadly as Initiator, Facilitator and Devil’sadvocate and Observer.Members with Initiator style will be proactive to reach out to the relevant members in the team andwould have the ability to identify conflicts and risks requiring consensus building exercise.Facilitators are active participants to discussions and provide suggestions and alternate options tothe arrive at consensus. They will diffuse emotional, aggressive conflicting situations through theirunbiased, mature conversation style, humor sense or power position in the team.Devil’s advocates are active participants questioning the status quo in the team.Observers are passive participants who do not typically voice their views pro-actively but are thedoers in the group.It is important for program manager to identify the working style of the team members and use thisto his/her advantage while managing the program. For instance, one would like to have morefacilitators present in a conflict resolution meeting and perhaps a devil’s advocate while negotiatinga contract with an external agency. A program manager has to adopt all these styles depending onthe situation while leading a program.6.4 Cross Cultural Communication ModelOne of the characteristics which differentiate a virtual team from a location specific team is the widediversity of cultures. Cultures define our approach towards working with different members whichcan be perspectives and values towards deliverables and outcomes. A commonly reference theoryon Culture is that of Greet Hofstede’s., who analyzed cultural values on dimensions such asindividualism, uncertainty avoidance, power distance, masculinity-femininity and self-restraint etc.For a marketing program manager working with cross cultural virtual teams, developing anunderstanding of the cross cultural differences and adapting his communication and programapproach to sensitivities of other members is of utmost importance. Because of the relevance ofcultural sensitivities in understanding market trends and successful achievement of programoutcomes, organizations today conduct a number of Cultural Sensitivity Training programs formembers of its marketing organizations. The Transnational Management Association’s CountryNavigator portal for example, helps a program manager profile his cultural values and styles on anine point scale and compare it with the various countries where its virtual team members arestationed.12 Page
  • 13. Authors have highlighted dimensions of a cross cultural communication model which arerelevant when managing global programs. Given below are a few case scenarios of culturalsensitivity which needs to be taken into account while handling marketing programs in a virtualenvironment: Cultural Dimensions Scheduling Virtual teams work across different time zones and scheduling meetings across Meetings time zones is a challenge. In a few cultures (like India , China and many Asian Countries), scheduling meeting post working hours may be considered acceptable , but in a few others (Germany) stick to deadlines and is particular of timekeeping Explicit vs. Americans/German teams have a very explicit communication styles – direct, Implicit assertive and message which is spelt out clear and concise. It is imperative to Communication learn to read the signals, and to read between the lines. Team work Some cultures like and prefer to work in a group than on an individual basis. Therefore a marketing initiative which requires delegation, negotiation and decision making will make such cultures more comfortable. Initiation of Initiation of marketing meetings in a virtual environment with resources from Conversation cross cultures requires careful consideration of various aspects. Few cultures encourage relationship building such as an ice breaking session, before moving on to business scenarios. Conflict Different cultures may have different ways of handling conflicts. Launch Management marketing program described in the paper heading for its due date will be an apt example for this. Under such scenarios, where there is a possibility of tense conversations with varying degree of assertions, different members of a launch team may react differently. If we have a background of members who belong to cultures which do not encourage such open conversations, there is a possibility of such members taking the situation personally. Risk The way a member of a virtual team perceives risk is an important aspect of Perceptions cross cultural sensitiveness. The degree of acceptance and appreciation of risk associated with a proposed project varies – For example, US as a culture is more appreciative of handling risk and uncertainties. Many cultures such as the French have been generally found to be more protective and act more proactively to safeguard the program and self.13 Page
  • 14. 7. ConclusionThrough the use of survey, personal experiences, one-on-one interviews with leaders and a realtime product launch case study, authors have attempted to describe challenges managing virtualteams in the marketing world. We understand many of these challenges may not be unique tomarketing only.The suggested solution framework aims at providing guidance to marketing program managers andproject management practitioners who are looking to increasingly use virtual teaming to enableeffective marketing without spiraling costs. With the pro-active use of some of the concepts andframeworks mentioned in the paper, it is possible to combat most of the challenges managingvirtual teams while also noting that particular situations may emerge which may require modificationof the methods suggested.8. Bibliographyal., K. e. (2007). Conflict and Performance in Global Virtual Teams. Journal of ManagementInformation Systems.al., S. e. (Volume 32 No. 4, Fall 2001). New Product Development Decision-Making Effectiveness:Comparing Individuals, Face-To-Face Teams, and Virtual Teams. Decision Sciences.Association, T. M. (n.d.). www.countrynavigator.com. Retrieved from The TransnationalManagement Association’s Country Navigator Portal.Hofstede, G. (2010). Theory of Cultural Dimensions (Updated). Cultures and Organizations:Software of the Mind.Shachaf, P. (2008). Cultural diversity and information and communication technology impacts onglobal virtual teams: An exploratory study. Information and Management, 45(2), 131‐142.14 Page
  • 15. 9. Appendix 1Virtual Team Effectiveness QuestionnaireQuestion 1 – What is your job role in your team? A. Project Manager B. Project Team ContributorQuestion 2 – What are the typical challenges you have had in your engagement/projects whileworking in virtual teams? (Rank from most prevalent (1) to least prevalent or nonexistent (9) ) A. Cultural Issues – Dealing with different cultures as part of my engagement with various stakeholders and teams B. Governance Issues – Decision making and tracking progress are issues C. Communication Issues – Clear and consistent communication of messaging and other marketing assets is difficult across geographies D. Role and Responsibility Identification E. Prioritization of tasks that need to be done by the team – Everyone thinks their own tasks are the most important F. Identification of the right messaging for products/services G. Process Issues – Launch/Go-To- Market/Product Development/Market and Customer Intelligence processes are not well defined H. Capacity Issues – Not having right or enough resources I. Data Acquisition – Marketing Data (customer, competitor and industry intelligence, product sales reports , customer information) and document acquisition from other teams is delayed J. Other Issues (Please specify)Question 3– Rate the importance of work parameter while working in a virtual team (Scale of 1 to 5from much worse to much better) A. Time for decision making B. Cost C. Responsiveness D. Efficiency E. Quality of work(Output/ Deliverables)Question 4– What, according to you, are the major benefits of working in a virtual team? (Rank thesein order from Most Useful (1) to Least Useful (7)) A. Improved time to completion for collateral/messaging or marketing projects B. More clear and effective communication (two way, translated) C. Time saved through reduction of decision making delays D. Real time collaboration facilitated discussion time savings E. Faster GTM (Go To Market) and generic marketing planning F. Better sharing of information across the team (reports/analytics) G. Others (Please specify)15 Page
  • 16. 10. Appendix 2aResearch Results(n=30)Figure 116 Page
  • 17. 11. Appendix 2bResearch Results(n=30)Figure 217 Page
  • 18. 12. Appendix 2cResearch Results(n=30)Figure 3 Virtual Teams Effect on work parameters Time for decision making -0.03 Response Times for team members 0.10 Quality of work 0.33 Efficiency of work 0.43 Cost 0.60 -2 -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 218 Page
  • 19. 13. Appendix 3Excerpts from an interview with a marketing leader, who is currently managing a large virtualmarketing team in Hewlett Packard(One example) Interview transcript with Director, Technology Services Marketing, HewlettPackard1. What are the major challenges you face while working with your global teams?Given we span all regions of the world and multiple time zones, Alignment & Communication arethe key challenges we face. While we communicate effectively and frequently via e-mail, oftentimes the best or only way to effectively communicate is live voice-to-voice, which means phonecalls at very inconvenient times for some of our team members.2. In your opinion, what has been the impact of virtual team engagements on marketingKPAs – Time/Resource Availability, Marketing Spends, Return on Marketing Investment etc.There are both positives and negatives associated with the global virtual team model. The negativeis what I stated above, i.e. inconvenient times for meetings/calls and challenges associated withaligning a global team. However, the global virtual team model also provides advantages in that―work can follow the sun‖, meaning we can pass and hand-off work from one region and time zoneto the next so that the project continues to progress 24x7.3. What could be done to improve the current operating model for virtual teams inmarketing?Adequate funding for both people and program money is always a challenge that every globalmarketing team faces, so increases in marketing funding drives a corresponding increase in ROI.4. Which marketing activities work best with virtual teams?Activities that are VERY clearly defined and scoped out at the beginning of the project. I havefound that spending more time up front ensuring everyone is on the same page and knows who isdoing what, is a very prudent investment as the team can then execute against clearly definedgoals with everyone pulling in the same direction.5. As a marketing leader, what has been the single most important challenge while workingwith your extended team across countries?Balancing the seemingly infinite and ever-increasing demands for more out of marketing with thevery finite resources (people, time, money) we have. Requires being very tough on settingpriorities and then being very transparent and communicative to stakeholders on what marketingwill do, and equally important, what marketing will not do, with our precious/finite resources.19 Page
  • 20. 14. Author’s Profile Sowmya Moni has 12+ years of proven experience in technology marketing. She is a senior marketing manager with Hewlett Packard’s Global Analytics team. She holds an MBA in Marketing from MDI, Gurgaon and is a certified PMP. She has co-authored the paper with her team Rashmi K, Yamuna Padmanaban and Abhishek RVRK Sharma.20 Page

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