Day 2   1230 - 1315 - pearl 2 - alankar karpe
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  • This first step is basically concerned with the gathering of all relevant fact around the issue. They should be registered without restrictions or filtering to be sorted out and organized later.It is important to make sure that the issue is really related to ethics and professional conduct and is not a legal issue or a question of diffent personal opinions.You should also assess whether the issue is PMI related or not, which may have consequences for further procedures.Thus, assessment means basically to check the pertinence and relevance of the issue.
  • Once you have the an overview of the facts, you may start to think about what to do. Generally, we tend to go for solution that we are familiar with. However, it is recommended to explore other options, try to think from different perspectives.There are probably several possible ways to follow, each of which should be thought through, in order to be able campare and to make a rational choice of the option that appears as the best.
  • Analysis means basically to look closley into somthing and tying to understand how it works.So, once you have chosen one of the alternatives, you should look at it in detail to the balance of the “cost” (harm) and the benefits the choice may provoke.This requires some abstract and at the same time rational thinking, so make sure that you are in an emotional condition to do such rational thinking. A trusted person might be able to help you with this analysis.
  • Provided you feel confident with the decision that you are going to take, you may find it interesting to stop and reflect about the ethical principles.There many principles you can refer to, from universal or global ethical values to very individual and personal ones.And, of course, you consider the PMI Code of Ethics.
  • By now, you are almost ready to act. You have the facts, know the alternatives, have analyzed its impact and have applied ethical principles.Now you have to make sure that you feel ready to confront yourself with any kind of consequences that can come up.You have to feel confident now that to act is better than not to act.But you should prepare for the “day after”, for reactions that may be different from what you expected.

Day 2 1230 - 1315 - pearl 2 - alankar karpe Presentation Transcript

  • 1. 1 The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making Alankar Karpe, Ethics Member Advisory Group, PMI 28 September 2013
  • 2. 2The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making Agenda The EMAG Leadership Leadership and Ethics The PMI Ethical Decision-Making Framework Ethical Resources @ PMI
  • 3. 3 What is Ethics Member Advisory Group (EMAG) • The mission of the Ethics Member Advisory Group • Monitor the usage of the Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct by stakeholders. • Recommend principles and procedures for the periodic review and/or amendment of the Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct. • Facilitate Code learning & discussion to achieve adherence to the Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct. • Facilitate communications with stakeholders regarding the Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct. The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 4. 4 THE EMAG TEAM William G. Scarborough, Vice President & General Counsel Jill Cherpak, Communications Specialist › Giusi Meloni, PMP (Team Leader) › Peter Pfeiffer, PMP › Shobhna Raghupathy, PMP › Paul Pelletier LL.B. PMP › Michael O’Brochta, PMP › Chris Kindermans, PMP › Kelly Oliveira › Alankar Karpe, PMP The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 5. 5 ABOUT LEADERSHIP… Strategic Leadership Situational Leadership lead·er·ship (ldr-shp) n. 1. The position or office of a leader; 2. Capacity or ability to lead; 3. Process of social influence 4. Guidance; direction. Followership Participative Leadership Toxic Leadership Innovative Leadership Servant Leadership The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 6. 6 ABOUT A LEADER… The leader is responsible for the set of ethics or norms that govern the behavior of the people in the organization. Leaders set the moral tone. W. Bennis Exemplary leaders know that if they want to gain commitment and achieve the highest standards, they must be models of the behavior they expect of others. Leaders model the way. J. Kouzes The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 7. 7 ABOUT A LEADER… It’s clear that if people anywhere are to willingly follow someone - whether it be into battle or into the boardroom, the front office or the front lines - they first want to assure themselves that the person is worthy of their trust. J. Kouzes The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 8. 8 LEADERSHIP & ETHICS Ethical Behavior Building Trust Effective Leadership Project Success The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 9. 9 OUR CODE OF ETHICS & PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT Fairness is our duty to make decisions and act impartially and objectively. Our conduct must be free from competing self interest, prejudice, and favoritism. Responsibility is our duty to take ownership for the decisions we make or fail to make, the actions we take or fail to take, and the consequences that result. Respect is our duty to show a high regard for ourselves, others, and the resources entrusted to us. Resources entrusted to us may include people, money, reputation, the safety of others, and natural or environmental resources. Honesty is our duty to understand the truth and act in a truthful manner both in our communications and in our conduct. Excerpts from the PMI® Code of Ethics and Professional ConductThe Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 10. 10 WHY THIS CODE? • to instill confidence in the Project Management profession; • to advance our profession, both individually and collectively; • to assist us in making wise decisions. We believe that the credibility and reputation of the Project Management profession is shaped by the collective conduct of individual practitioners. Which is why we have… Excerpts from the PMI® Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct The PMI Ethical Decision Making Framework The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 11. 11 Advantages of being Ethical Goodwill Increased amount of trust within team Moral, loyal and motivated employees (High productivity) Stakeholders confidence Competitive Edge in the market Long term positive effects Presentation Title
  • 12. 12 Examples of Ethical issues Admission of Wrongdoing Profit Vs. People motivation Lack of Authority Short-Term Project, Long-Term Consequences Vendor selection Reporting Presentation Title
  • 13. 13 A FEW FACTS ABOUT THE PMI EDMF • The PMI EDMF has been developed for use by PMI members and PMI credential holders; • It is aspirational and not mandatory; • It is intended to be used as a guideline document to provoke critical thinking throughout the ethical decision-making process; • It starts as a sequence of questions and sub-questions to stimulate the user to recognize and assess the given situation or an issue; • The PMI EDMF users may find useful to loop back-and-forth between steps and challenge themselves with additional steps and questions; • The answers to the questions proposed by the PMI EDMF are the responsibility of the user • EDMF can not resolve specific ethical dilemmas, but can surely help to clarify the situation, eliminate poor choices, and illuminate better possibilities The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 14. 14 PMI EDMF IN SHORT Assessment Make sure you have all the facts about the ethical issue Alternatives Consider your choices Analysis Identify your candidate decision and test its validity Application Apply ethical principles to your candidate decision Action Make your decision The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 15. 16Presentation Title • Does it abide by the law? • Does it align with the PMI Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct? • Does it agree with your employer’s and client’s code of ethics and conduct? • Does it align with your ethical values and those of the surrounding culture? • View PMI's Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct • Access ethics resources • View Ethics Case Procedures. • Identify your personal values and hold them against the surrounding culture. Assessment Make sure you have all the facts about the ethical issue Are there substantial facts to make a case? No Gather more facts or discard the case Yes Go to the next step Tools & TechniquesGuiding questions ...
  • 16. 18 • Have you listed all the possible alternative options / choices? • Have you considered pros and cons for each possible choice? • Identify your different options from a legal, juridical, professional and cultural point of view. • Use Decision making techniques (e.g., 5 Why’s, …) • Use pros/cons list. • Compare and prioritize your options. Alternatives Consider your choices Are there viable options? No Gather more facts, explore more alternatives or discard the case Yes Go to the next step Tools & TechniquesGuiding questions ... The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 17. 20 • Will your candidate decision have a positive impact or prevent harm to PMs, PMI staff or volunteers, clients, your employer’s organization, other stakeholders, the environment, or future generations? • Does your candidate decision take cultural differences into account? • Looking back, will this decision seem like a good idea a year from now? • Are you free from external influence to make this decision? • Are you in a calm and unstressed state of mind? • Identify where and whom your possible decision could impact. • Analyze the degree of harm your possible decision could cause. • Balance the possible harm and/or benefit that decision may provoke, now or in the future. • Put your decision in some time perspective (How will you feel about it in 1 month, 1 year, 5 years from now?) • Consider to allow yourself a cool-down period (Are you not over-reacting?). Analysis Identify your candidate decision and test its validity Yes Go to the next step Are the possible impacts acceptable? No Review the facts and your options or discard the case Tools & TechniquesGuiding questions ... The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 18. 22 • Would your choice result in the greatest good? • Would your choice treat others as you would like to be treated? • Would your choice be fair and beneficial to all concerned? • Hold your candidate decision against the Code of Ethics. • Apply ethical principles to your candidate decision. • Review the situation with one or more trusted persons. Application Apply ethical principles to your candidate decision Is your decision consistent? Yes Go to the next step No Review the facts, the options and the implications or discard the case Tools & TechniquesGuiding questions ... The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 19. 24 Are you willing to accept responsibility for your decision? Could you make your decision public and feel good about it? Are you ready to act? • Analyze the consequences your decision may have on emotional state, your social life and your professional career. • Prepare a plan of action for the “day after” (the decision). • Consider your position and your reaction on most of the critiques that you might receive in the course of the actions. Yes act on your decision Action Make your decision Guiding questions ... Tools & Techniques Are you comfortable with the decision? No Review the facts, the options, the implications or your decision, or discard the case The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making
  • 20. 25 You may subscribe to Ethics in Project Management CoP at http://ethics.vc.pmi.org/Public/Home.aspx ETHICAL RESOURCES @ PMI The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making http://www.pmi.org/Ethics
  • 21. 26 CONTACT INFO Alankar Karpe, PMP ethics.mag@pmi.org The Leader’s Choice: Five Steps to Ethical Decision Making