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The Little Big Book Club   Linking Public Libraries, Publishers And Early Readers
 

The Little Big Book Club Linking Public Libraries, Publishers And Early Readers

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Presentation at ALA conference in New Orleans as part of the international celebration of early literacy programs in libraries.

Presentation at ALA conference in New Orleans as part of the international celebration of early literacy programs in libraries.

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  • The Little Big Book Club established in 2005 was an important extension to the existing Big Book Club and is an early intervention family literacy campaign initially funded by the State Government of South Australia aimed to encourage parents to read to their children from birth.  Its purpose is to promote positive influences for children in their first four years of life.  TLBBC provides a window of opportunity to positively influence the outcomes of children for school success and success in later life.  Through promoting the importance of reading to children from a very early age, parents are providing their children with a crucial early base  THE PARTNERSHIP:TLBBC working in partnership with public libraries in regional and metropolitan South Australia, Western Australia and Queensland have developed significant relationships with funding partners, service providers and high profile media support.  As an example: Every baby born in South Australia is eligible to receive a TLBBC FREE Reading Story Time pack which contains a specially commissioned book each year, It’s Rhyme Time DVD and a It’s Story Time Reading bag. It’s Rhyme Time DVD is a South Australian initiative, is it entertaining for children, and also provides a modeling and educative role for parents, on how to read and interact with their children. The DVD includes segments in other languages and AUSLAN translations. The DVD is considered a valuable resource for parents, in improving literacy levels and gaining confidence to read to their children. In Western Australia, the BETTER BEGINNINGS program is the vehicle for delivery of material to babies and families, using TLBBC custom made resources as well as suitable titles from commercial publishers.ABOUT THE BIG BOOK CLUB:The Big Book Club established in 2003 as a not for profit independent Arts Organization has successfully managed to attract top Australian and international authors to both metropolitan and regional South Australians through a unique and exciting initiative encouraging South Australians to read together. See http://www.thelittlebigbookclub.com.au
  • Better Beginnings aims to put research into practice by supporting parents of new born babies to enjoy books, rhyme and song with their young children. To give their children a love of reading and language.Research conducted by the Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth (established by Professor Fiona Stanley OAM) found that children up to the age of five who have limited exposure to printed language and who have not been read to as a child have increase risk for reading failure and general poor school performance.  International research shows that 75 per cent of brain development occurs between birth and age three and an early exposure to books greatly contributes to early literacy development and school-readiness. There are strong links between literacy, school performance, self-esteem and life chances with poor literacy skills being linked with lower education, earnings, health and social outcomes as well as high unemployment, welfare dependence and teenage parenting. Better Beginnings builds on parents’ role as their child’s first teacher by providing high quality literacy materials and nurturing settings to create positive experiences around books and language. Extending this work, the program then makes the link between home and school recognising the importance of teachers and parents working together to promote literacy. Parental involvement is vital to a child’s success at school and that one of the most effective ways of achieving this is through shared reading between parents and children
  • The first tentative idea of creating a powerful and positive link between young children as early readers, their local public library and commercial publishers, came at a social event at Adelaide Writers Week in 2002. 12 months later the Big Book Club was born and started creating events around the availability of authors. The relationship net ‘worked’ because of the symbiotic mix of publicity (The Advertiser), product (The Publishers & their authors), the Place (local public library)TLBBC FREE Reading Story Time pack is available from the library or the Child and Youth Health Centre this is a key strategy to connect with new parents, who may not be library users. When collecting a pack, customers are provided with information about the library and are encouraged to join the library. It is worth noting that over 400,000 It’s Rhyme Time are in circulation nationally due to relationships established between The Big Book Club Inc and other state and national early childhood reading development initiatives.  A comprehensive training and development strategy ‘Building Literacy Before School’ was first implemented in South Australia in conjunction with University of South Australia, Public Library Service of SA and The Big Book Club Inc to ensure that library staffs have the necessary skills to successfully engage with new parents. This training model has been effectively implemented in the majority of states and territories in Australia.A specifically designed Baby Bounce and Rhyme program has been developed and implemented in a majority of metropolitan and regional libraries with overwhelming attendance. These highly popular sessions include story reading, nursery rhymes and singing and are seen as an idea opportunity to encourage language development, social interaction with parents and other babies and therefore reduce social isolation.  The program illustrates the essential role libraries play in literacy development, the building of social capital and encouraging a socially inclusive community. It has also assisted in Libraries developing strong relationships with Child and Youth Health and Child Care Centers as these stakeholders are the main provider of services to new parents and careers.
  • The Advertiser Little Big Book Club is proudly supported by the Government of South Australia through Arts SA, The State Library through its Public Library Services of South Australia with the support of Local Government.The Australia Council, the Australian Government’s arts funding and advisory body, through its Community Partnerships and Market Development Division Section. Our major media partners:  The Advertiser (SA), The Courier Mail (QLD) , The SUNDAY Times (WA) , all members of the Murdoch group pf media companies. Publishers of books for children, from early years Board Books right through to Rio Tinto Future Fund:Since 2005, the Rio Tinto WA Future Fund (RTWAFF), the State Government and Western Australian local governments have partnered to provide funding and in-kind support to develop and deliver Better Beginnings in Western Australia.  Better Beginnings is a proven successful family literacy initiative that has delivered over 70,000 reading packs and free books, through public libraries and community health centres, to families with babies across the state.  With the ultimate goal to raise literacy levels throughout WA, the program has had a significant positive impact on parental early reading practices, attitudes and beliefs.
  • Reading Packs:As an example: Every baby born in South Australia is eligible to receive a TLBBC FREE Reading Story Time pack which contains a specially commissioned book each year, It’s Rhyme Time DVD and a It’s Story Time Reading bag. It’s Rhyme Time DVD is a South Australian initiative, is it entertaining for children, and also provides a modeling and educative role for parents, on how to read and interact with their children. The DVD includes segments in other languages and AUSLAN translations. The DVD is considered a valuable resource for parents, in improving literacy levels and gaining confidence to read to their children. Vegemite Little Aussie Reader Scrapbooks their sponsorship enabled500thousand scrapbooks to be distributed, and some very picturesque publicity shots. However disaster with iSnack 2.0 led to a severe reduction in marketing spend in the next year. Tips for parents on reading aloud to their childrenAge appropriate booklists to help parents select appropriate booksSections to record family memories and wordsActions to nursery rhymes, clapping and action songDilly Bag Project (Qld)Rotary D9600 Literacy Project, Tales from a Dilly Bag, project assists young Indigenous children and those from other cultures to develop Emergent Literacy skills. These skills, developed during the early childhood years, are needed as the foundation for learning to be literate.  Contents:A dilly bag and a large blue plastic box with approximately 55 quality children’s picture storybooks including Indigenous stories suitable for very young children;  A teacher’s folder with project information, a DVD with activity sheets to match the picture books and files for 2 scrapbooks that can be printed and used with young;  Reading mentor badges x10;  A craft box containing stationery and craft materials;  A digital camera, case and memory card – (digital photos may be used as a stimulus for writing with young children). (Defn: The Dilly bag otherwise known as "yakou", "yibali" or "But But Bags" is a bag worn around the neck to hold food like berries, meat, fish etc. the Dilly bag is normally woven out of vines or tough dried grasses and sometimes had feather or animal fur inside the bag to stop small pieces of food falling through holes in the weave. Mainly used by women to gather food but can be used by men to help carry some tools for hunting) State Library of Tasmania – 1500 baby books in “Baby Book Bags” for borrowing as a bag resource in homes (unofficial loose lending policies) Digital – can we make the link to live web?If not remind people that Tricia at ALA will have the full paper on it and all the linkshttp://www.thelittlebigbookclub.com.au/boombah/flash.html
  • RESOURCES:All resources available from web site at various pricesLarge orders negotiated for systems and large librariesYou may note the mug in top corner and wonder about the flower power logo?National Year of Reading 2012Australian libraries and library associations have got together to turn 2012 into the National Year of Reading, linking together all the great things that are already happening around books, reading and literacy, and giving them an extra boost, with inspirational programs and events taking place across the country.We’ll be partnering with government, writers, schools, publishers, booksellers, employers, child care providers, health professionals and a whole host of other organisations that share our passion for reading.“Having books in the home has a greater impact on children in the most disadvantaged families. It is at the lower end of the scale, where books are scarce, that each additional book matters most.” Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 2010William McInnes is the patron - photo www.love2read.org.au
  • Local Libraries are safe, free and available, with professional staff and all the materials and environments requiredBooksellers are happy to work with their local library when an author or illustrator visits. Worried about the commercial component? It’s easier for parents to buy the book at the time, than make another trip, remember the title etc.Doctor/Speechie etcPut the resources where the children and their parents are. Some experimentation with roving resource packs – although not quite at stage of Columbia Library here (US) where early literacy educators take Story Time at local surgery waiting rooms.
  • The New Arrivals program aims to provide a free reading and activity pack for every family with young children that enter Australia as part of the Australian Government Department of Immigration and Citizenship Humanitarian Program. Research indicates that children develop emergent literacy skills that are transferable across languages so whether parents read aloud in their familial language or in English, the benefits remain the same. However, the concern is that if parents cannot read English and they are not engaged or encouraged to read to their children, these children are placed at a disadvantage and risk having lower emergent literacy levels One of the major roadblocks in providing age appropriate reading materials for young families in a multilingual format is the prohibitive cost associated with translation. However with the generous support of Kraft Foods Australia/New Zealand, The Little Big Book Club has been able to develop a picture book called Wilbur and have it translated into twelve languages, with English as the common language throughout. Three versions of the book will be available and include: Version 1: Somali/Tamil/Burmese/Farsi/English Version 2: Dinka/Hindi/Khmer/Nuer/English Version 3: Amharic/Chinese/Arabic/French/English Written by renowned children’s author Phil Cummings, Wilbur tells the story of a friendly pet dog that goes on an adventure in his neighbourhood. The book is a great introduction to Australian culture and recreation and uses simple language that encourages the use and practice of English.
  • EXTENDING THE RANGE:Smart librarians use whatever resources they can find – local authors, speakers agencies etc
  • THE REASON WHY:High and low profile parents and carers sharing with young children to ensure the love of books and reading provides the best start possible for their learning and life ahead.
  • The DIGITAL space – the IPAD, SONY , KINDLE etc will all make a difference to how, when and what our children read.The Funding: Stories from around the world are not cheerful. Australia and New Zealand relatively protected, although per capita spending is low in comparison to Europe and USA, at least is (?) stableSocial Inclusion Issues – many librarians tell anecdotal stories about the importance of the Reading and Story times to their patrons – not only for the literacy rewards, but also for the networks & friendships developed. We know that educated and resiliant adults make better parents.The Library as a Place/The Librarian as a FacilitatorComment on Seth Godin’s blog regarding the requirement for librarians rather than libraries. National Year of ReadingPartnership between libraries, sponsored by ALIA, National and all State Libraries, other sponsors, bookshops, publishers and educators slower but the tide is rising. Dedicated couple of ‘movers and shakers’, Sue and Donna at The Library Agency, getting the whole thing running.Projects muted include that wonderful combination of commercial and philosophical, but need the
  • ABOUT:BETTER BEGINNINGS: The Better Beginnings Family Literacy Program is coordinated by the State Library of WA and delivered through public libraries to support parents as their child’s first teacher.Better Beginnings brings together babies and books, and families and libraries through a range of activities such as:Baby rhyme and story sessions hosted by librariesA range of books, rhymes and songs to share with your babyFamily Reading Centres and books about parentingHelp with finding and choosing books for your baby and youParent information events with health and library professionalsStory-time boxes with books, puppets, instruments and more to use in playgroups. http://www.better-beginnings.com.auTHE LITTLE BIG BOOK CLUB:The Little Big Book Club established in 2005 was an important extension to the existing Big Book Club (see notes below) and is an early intervention family literacy campaign funded by the State Government of South Australia aimed to encourage parents to read to their children from birth.  Its purpose is to promote positive influences for children in their first four years of life.  TLBBC provides a window of opportunity to positively influence the outcomes of children for school success and success in later life.  Through promoting the importance of reading to children from a very early age, parents are providing their children with a crucial early base http://www.thelittlebigbookclub.com.au ALS LIBRARY SERVICES:Australian owned and operated, ALS has been in the business of partnering with Australian public libraries for over 40 years. We provide fast and accurate selection,cataloging and processing of the latest books and media through our doors and directly to public library shelves.At our Head Office and Warehouse in the south of Adelaide, South Australia, we have around 50 team members working each day to bring the latest Australian and international publications to public libraries throughout the states and territories.http://www.alslib.com.au PATRICIA GENAT:Patricia has 15 years management experience within the Australian and New Zealand book industry including publishing, distribution, on-line services and printing. Her wide experience is built on a solid business and educational base, including a Master in Business, and a Graduate Diploma in Information Studies (Librarianship). She runs ALS Services with an eye always on the future trends in the industry and looks forward to the daily and extra ordinary challenges of working within the library services arena in the twenty-first century.Patricia currently sits on the Board of the Big Book Club Inc, and the Australian Booksellers Association.www.triciaatala.blogspot.com??

The Little Big Book Club   Linking Public Libraries, Publishers And Early Readers The Little Big Book Club Linking Public Libraries, Publishers And Early Readers Presentation Transcript

  • The Little Big Book Club - Linking Public Libraries, Publishers and Early Readers
    Patricia Genat of ALS Library Services
    Teresa Brook of Public Library Services
    Sue Hill of Little Big Book Club
    June 2011
  • 75% of brain development occurs between birth and age three
    An early exposure to books & reading together, greatly contributes to early literacy skills and school readiness
    Public Libraries are uniquely placed to:
    Provide a safe community space to share reading
    Provide excellence in resources, materials & programs
    Create essential networks for parents, carers, teachers
    Publishers need marketing opportunities and guaranteed sales channels.
    Why?
    The Little Big Book Club AUSTRALIA
  • It’s always who you know!
    Planning, Programs & Partners
    The relationship net ‘worked’ because of the symbiotic mix of
    Publicity ( newspaper sponsorship in kind)
    Product (publishers & their authors), and
    Place (local public library)
    Price -free (thank you Australia Council)
    How?
    The Little Big Book Club AUSTRALIA
  • The Little Big Book Club AUSTRALIA
    PARTNERS
  • The Little Big Book Club AUSTRALIA
    What ?
    Reading Packs
    Baby Book Bags
    Dilly Bags
    Aussie Vegemites Scrapbooks
    Picture Book to Performance
    Digital too http://www.thelittlebigbookclub.com.au/boombah/flash.html
  • RESOURCES
    The Little Big Book Club AUSTRALIA
    http://www.love2read.org.au/
  • Your Local library,
    Mobile Library Van
    Booksellers – with local library partnership
    Doctors/Dentists/Speech Pathologists/Outreach programs
    State Libraries – holiday and special programs
    Infant Welfare Clinics
    Remote Areas
    Web sites
    Where & When?
    The Little Big Book Club AUSTRALIA
  • The Little Big Book Club AUSTRALIA
    SPECIAL CULTURAL PROGRAMS
  • Authors & Illustrators sharing with pre-school and school age children
    The Little Big Book Club AUSTRALIA
    SHARING
  • The Little Big Book Club AUSTRALIA
    Sharing
    can happen anywhere
    SHARING
  • Digital stuff…
    Funding
    Social inclusion issues
    The Library as a place/The librarian as a facilitator
    National Year of Reading
    The Little Big Book Club AUSTRALIA
    What next?
  • Thank You,
    Keep Reading
    Tricia
    patricia.genat@alslib.com.au
    The Little Big Book Club AUSTRALIA