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Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced
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Partners in Weather Preparedness – Advanced

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Speaker:  Ted Buehner Warning Coordination Meteorologist National Weather Service …

Speaker:  Ted Buehner Warning Coordination Meteorologist National Weather Service
This session provides an extension of information presented in the basic session (see D4). Topics
include: - How to obtain and use National Weather Service (NWS) all-hazards weather support -
Significant Pacific Northwest weather patterns - Storm Surveys – what they are, when are they done
and the local emergency manager‟s participation in them - Washington‟s Presidentially weather-related
disaster rankings and fatality statistics - How to use the NWS web page such as interpreting the weather
radar and satellite imagery, climate/historical data, spotter reports, new digital forecasts and use in your
GIS operations (live demo is planned) - StormReady and TsunamiReady communities – what do they
mean to you and how to apply and get recognized for the work you do - Address your questions.

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  • 1. Partners In Weather Preparedness Advanced Session An Extension of the Basic Session Ted Buehner Warning Coordination Meteorologist National Weather Service Seattle/Tacoma
  • 2. Pacific NW NWS Warning Coordination Meteorologists C di ti M t l itSeattle Ted Buehner 206-526-6095 x223 ted.buehner@noaa.gov db h @Portland Tyree Wilde 503-326-2340 x223 tyree.wilde@noaa.gov tyree wilde@noaa govSpokane Anthony Cavallucci 509-244-0110 x223 anthony.cavallucci@noaa.govPendleton Dennis Hull 541-276-7832 x223 dennis.hull@noaa.gov @ gMedford Ryan Sandler 541-773-1067 x223 ryan.sandler@noaa.govBoise Robert Diaz 208-334-9860 x223 robert.diaz@noaa.gov
  • 3. National Weather Service Mission (Serving America Since 1870)Provide Weather, Hydrologic, and ClimateForecasts and Warnings for the United gStates, its Territories, Adjacent Watersand Ocean Areas, for the Protection of Lifeand Property and Enhancement of theNational Economy.We are Partners with a Common Mission
  • 4. Outline• Significant Pacific NW Weather Patterns• Storm Surveys• Area Hazardous Weather Stats• StormReady / TsunamiReady Communities• NWS All-Hazards Weather Support• What’s New In NWS Products and Services What s• Address Your Questions
  • 5. Significant Pacific NW Weather Patterns W th P tt• Meteorological “Bombs”• Gap Winds• Arctic Outbreaks• ‘Pi ‘Pineapple Express’ l E ’• Puget Sound Convergence Zone Zone
  • 6. How Does the Pacific NW Rank Nationally ?
  • 7. Pacific NW Weather is Terrain Driven
  • 8. Topography vsAnnualPrecipitation
  • 9. Pacific NWWind Storms or “Meteorological Bombs”
  • 10. Columbus Day Storm: Oct 12, 1962http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/sew/WindstormBro.pdf
  • 11. Dec 2006
  • 12. Gap Winds p• Related to pressure gradient forces• Common in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Columbia River, Fraser River, Cascade Passes• Reverses from summer to winter• Wi d accelerates in narrow gaps Wind l t i (”Bernoulli Effect”)
  • 13. Gap Winds (summer example) (reversal in winter)Adapted from “Mountain Meteorology - Fundamentals and Applications”, Whiteman, 2000
  • 14. Arctic Yukon HighOutbreaks Outflow from the Fraser th F CanyonTwo Feet of Snow
  • 15. Atmospheric Rivers –aka – the Pineapple Express .........
  • 16. Characteristics of Pacific NW Flooding Extended periods of heavy rain combined withhigh freezing levels. Orographic forcing over terrain usually playsa major role in enhancing rainfall amounts. Low elevation snowmelt (below ~3,500 feet)can be an important factor. factor Typically higher mountain snowpack does notcontribute to runoff runoff. Spring snowpack thaw is only a serious floodthreat east of the Cascades. Most floods occur between November andFebruary.
  • 17. Puget Sound Convergence Zone g g
  • 18. Ingredients 1. Winds ith 1 Wi d with a westerly t l component. 2. A barrier. (In our case, the Olympic Mountains.) y p ) 3. Moisture. 3 Moisture
  • 19. What happens next?• If the air is “blocked” and cannot travel over the mountains, it must mountains find an alternate route.• What is the most probable alternate route for the air?• AROUND the Olympic Mountains on both sides.
  • 20. Convergence Causes Precipitation • Air colliding is called “convergence” • When the air converges on g the east side of the Olympics (usually over the Puget Sound area), it causes ), precipitation. • Why? • Convergence causes air to rise, which causes the moisture to condense and it t d d fall out as precipitation.
  • 21. Air AirClearing Cloud Cloud Cl d Cl d Clearing Droplets Droplets Skies Skies Air Air
  • 22. A Real Caseof CZ:
  • 23. Rain, Snow, or Thunderstorms? • During the winter, if the air is cold enough, precipitation can fall out as snow! • If there is enough instability we can even get thunderstorms in the Puget Sound area because of the convergence zone! Shifting Winds !!
  • 24. Storm Surveys y• What Are They?• When Are They Done?• Local Emergency Manager’s Participation P ti i ti I-90 Pileup – Feb 2007
  • 25. Storm Surveys y • What Are They? – Document significant weather events – Go into our climatological history – Records • Short term – Local Short-term Storm Reports • Long-term - RecordedNov 06 Floods in M thl StormData i Monthly St D t
  • 26. Storm Surveys y• When Are They Done? – Follow severe convective weather events • Examples – tornadoes, severe thunderstorms • Vancouver tornado – Jan 2008 – Can follow significant ‘long-fused’ events • Example – widespread major flooding • Early Dec 2007 storm
  • 27. Storm Surveys• Local Emergency Manager’s Participation – C Convective Weather Events • Asked to join the on-site survey of damage • Media often covers the survey party – Significant Long-Fuse Events • Usually conducted in your office following the event • Assesses NWS products and services throughout the event
  • 28. Storm Surveys• StormData – Monthly report submitted by all NWS Forecast Offices • Submitted 3 Months Following • Your Input Needed Depending on the Event – Includes: • Convective Weather Events • Long-Fused Weather Events • Fatalities, Injuries, Property Damage, Synopsis of Event – National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) • Publication – Monthly StormData • Available on Line at: – http://www5.ncdc.noaa.gov/pubs/publications.html
  • 29. Enhanced Fujita Scale (EF) Effective Feb 1, 2007 FUJITA SCALE EF SCALE Fastest 1/4-mile 3 Second Gust 3 Second GustF# EF # (mph) (mph) (mph)0 40-72 45-78 0 65-851 73-112 79-117 1 86-1102 113-157 118-161 2 111-1353 158-207 162-209 3 136-1654 208-260 210-261 4 166-2005 261-318 262-317 5 Over 200Recent example: Sep ‘09 Enumclaw tornado – EF1
  • 30. Hazardous Weather Stats• Presidentially Declared Weather-Related Disasters• Weather Statistics for Washington
  • 31. Hazardous Weather Stats• Presidentially Declared Weather-Related Disasters – #1 – Flooding ( ~50%) – #2 – Wi d Storm / Wi t /I Storms Wind St Winter/Ice St – #4 – Wildfires – #5 – Landslides
  • 32. Hazardous Weather Stats• Fatalities – #1 - Heat – #2 - Avalanche – #3 - Wi d t Windstorms – #4 - Winter/Ice Storms – #5 - Floods – #6 - Landslides
  • 33. Hazardous Weather Stats• Weather Statistics for Washington – Short-fused Convective Events • Thunderstorms – Produce » Lightning » Hail » H Heavy P Precipitation > Flash Floods i it ti Fl h Fl d » Downbursts » Tornadoes
  • 34. Hazardous Weather Stats• Weather Statistics for Washington – Short-fused Convective Events • Thunderstorms – Lightning » 1 fatality about every 5 years » Several injuries each year » Avg 10-20 thunderstorms / year » Th public is The bli i NOT thunderstorm proficient
  • 35. Hazardous Weather Stats• Weather Statistics for Washington – Short-fused Convective Events • Thunderstorms – Heavy Precipitation / Flash Floods » East of the Cascades concern » Flash Flood prone areas » Heppner, Ore Flash Flood » June 14, 1903 14 » Second deadliest flash flood in American history » 247 fatalities, washed away Heppner and Ione
  • 36. Hazardous Weather Stats• Weather Statistics for Washington – Short-fused Convective Events • Tornadoes – Average between 1 or 2 / year – O Occur anytime of year, primarily during transition ti f i il d i t iti seasons of spring and fall – Most quite weak – EF0 or EF1 – Three reported F3s in our history since 1950 – Apr 5, 1972 – Vancouver tornado » Plowed thru grocery store, bowling house, school » Killed 6, injured 200+ » Led nation in tornado deaths that year
  • 37. Hazardous Weather Stats• Weather Statistics for Washington – Long-fused Events • Heat • Cold • Avalanche • Winter Storms / Ice Storms • Flooding • Landslides • Wildfires • Coastal Flooding / Storm Surge • Dense Fog • Drought • Blowing Dust
  • 38. Hazardous Weather Stats• Weather Statistics for Washington – Long-fused Events • Heat – #1 Weather-related killer in the U.S. and the World – Over 1500 excess deaths from heat annually in the U.S. alone – More than all other weather-related fatalities combined – Heart Attacks, Strokes, Respiratory IIlnesses, Heat Stroke/Stress – Most Vulnerable » Elderly » Very Young » Those Left in Vehicles
  • 39. Hazardous Weather Stats• Weather Statistics for Washington – Long-fused Events Long fused Chicago, Illinois: g • Heat (#1 in July 1995 Daily Mortality Washington) 500 • Seattle area alone – 645 400 excess deaths 1975-1999 – Avg 27 per year 300 D eaths above normal e mortality rate 200 100 0 1 5 9 13 17 21 25 29 Day
  • 40. Hazardous Weather Stats• Weather Statistics for Washington – Long-fused Events Long fused • Avalanche – #2 Weather-related killer in Washington – Avg 3 fatalities per year since mid 1990s
  • 41. Hazardous Weather Stats • Weather Statistics for Washington – Long-fused Events • Wind Storms – #3 Weather-related killer in Washington – Average two fatalities per year – Several injuries per year – Usual Cause - Falling g Trees or Limbs – Hanakkah Eve Wind Storm of 2006Power Crew Working On Downed Power Lines » 15 fatalities (4 direct, 11 indirect)
  • 42. Hazardous Weather Stats• Weather Statistics for Washington – Long-fused Events • Flooding – No loss of life from 1999-2005 – Nov 2006 (2) – Dec 2007 (2) – Usual Causes Nov 2006 Floods – Cowlitz River » Driving across Photos Courtesy of Lewis County DEM flooded roadways » Trying to cross on foot
  • 43. Hazardous Weather Stats• Weather Statistics for Washington – Long-fused Events Long fused • Landslides, Wildfires, Dense Fog • Winter Storms / Ice Storms, Blowing Dust – Have all caused fatalities i th f t liti in the past – Property Damage
  • 44. Property Damage: Severe W th 1950-2006 Weather 1950-Total dollar amount of property damage is expressed inmillions of dollarsData was grouped into decadesFive events were covered: windstorms, thunderstorms,tornadoes, snow & ice, and floodingData is completely missing for the period between 1950- 1950-1955
  • 45. Fatalities: Severe Weather from 1950- 1950-200645403530 Windstorms Wi d t25 Thunderstorms20 Tornadoes15 Snow & Ice10 Flooding 5 0 1950- 1960- 1970- 1980- 1990- 2000- 1959 1969 1979 1989 1999 2006
  • 46. Injuries: Severe Weather from 1950- 1950-2006350300250200 Windstorms Thunderstorms150 Tornadoes100 Snow & Ice Flooding 50 0 1950- 1960- 1970- 1980- 1990- 2000- 1959 1969 1979 1989 1999 2006
  • 47. Property Damage: Severe Weather 1950- 1950-2006350300250 Windstorms200 Thunderstorms150 Tornadoes100 Snow & Ice 50 Flooding 0 1950- 1960- 1970- 1980- 1990- 2000- 1959 1969 1979 1989 1999 2006
  • 48. 2006The Distribution of Washington Tornados, 1950 -1994. 0 1 11 0 11 22 1 1 1 1 011 0 2 11 1 0 00 0 2 1 30 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 22 0 13 0 0 0 1 10 0 0 1 00 0 00 0 0 0 10 1 0 0 20 00 1 1 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 00 1 0 00 0 0 0 20 1 10 3
  • 49. Tornadoes Western Washington 1954-2006 10 9 8 ncy 7Frequen 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 y ri l ry ay r ne ly r st ch r er be be be ar Ju gu Ap ua ob M Ju ar nu em em em Au br M ct Ja Fe pt ov O ec Se N D Month Frequency of tornadoes each month of the year
  • 50. T o r n a d o W e s t e r n W a s h in g t o n T im e 1 9 5 4 -2 0 0 6 10 8 requency 6 A M H o u rs 4 P M H o u rsFr 2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 H o u rs Frequency of tornadoes throughout each hour of the day
  • 51. Hazardous Weather Stats• Weather Awareness Campaigns – All-Hazards Awareness Month (April) – Air Q alit Awareness Week (Ma 2 6) Quality A areness (May 2-6) – Pacific NW Severe Weather Awareness Week (May 1-7) – Lightning Safety Awareness Week (June 19-25) – Weather Radio Awareness Month (Sept) • Includes Statewide Earthquake Drill and Annual Coastal Tsunami Warning Communications Test – Pacific NW Winter Weather Awareness Week (Oct 16-22)
  • 52. StormReady / Sto eadyTsunamiReady Working Together to Save LivesOcean Shores Long Beach
  • 53. Is Your Community Ready?
  • 54. StormReady and TsunamiReady• Community preparedness programs with theprimary goal to improve public safety duringweather related emergencies• Cornerstones  Receive and disseminate weather information in 24 hour warning point/EOC  NOAA Weather Radios in public facilities  Community Outreach  Hazardous weather plan for community www.stormready.noaa.gov
  • 55. Recognition
  • 56. As of April 2011, there were over 1740 Storm/TsunamiReady Communities y across the nation • StormReady • TsunamiReady • University/Lab • I d t i l Site Industrial Sit • Indian Nation
  • 57. Washington – 53 Designees Oregon – 20, Idaho - 179You Don’t Get A Second Chance To Be Prepared
  • 58. How to Become a StormReady or T TsunamiReady Community? iR d C it ?• Want to Get Recognized for all your Preparedness Efforts?• Application and complete information available at: – www.stormready.noaa.gov• Your local NWS office contact – Your Warning Coordination Meteorologist g g
  • 59. The Pacific NW Faces Many Non-Weather Hazards Non- Earthquakes Tsunamis Terrorism Major Chemical Spills
  • 60. NWS All-Hazards Weather Support- Tsunami- Volcanic- HazMat- Search and Rescue- Earthquake- Dam Break- Terrorism
  • 61. Working Together When ‘It’ Happens• Weather Support – Phone, Radio – On-Line – On-Site• Emergency Message Dissemination• NOAA’s Hazmat Response and Restoration Office – Oil Spill – Chemical Spill – Coastal Contamination
  • 62. National Response FrameworkEmergency Support Functions (ESFs) NOAA/NWS Participation • ESF 1 – Transportation • ESF 2 – Communications • ESF 3 – Public Works and Engineering • ESF 4 – Firefighting • ESF 5 – Emergency Management • ESF 7 – Resource Support • ESF 9 – Urban Search and Rescue • ESF 10 – Oil and Hazardous Materials Response • ESF 11 – Agriculture and Natural Resources • ESF 12 – Energy • ESF 13 – Public Safety and Security • ESF 14 – Long-term Community Recovery and Mitigation Long term • ESF 15 – External Affairs
  • 63. All- All-Hazards Weather Support W h SNew Carrissa Selendang AYU 1999 2005 - Weather DataMissoula Derailment 1996 -FForecasts t Hurricane Katrina 2005 - Incident Mets - On-Site or from NWS Office - Exercises
  • 64. NWS Fire Weather / All-Hazards All-24/7 Phone Contacts (Unlisted) Forecaster Support and Coordination Seattle - 206-526-6088 Portland - 503-326-2420 Spokane - 509-244-5031 Pendleton - 541-276-8134
  • 65. NWS Seattle Amateur Radio W k t ti R di Workstation• UHF / VHF – K7MMI Repeater System, 147.20• Seattle 800 MHz, King, , g, Pierce, Snohomish counties• State CemNet• Packet, APRS• HF• Skywarn Recognition Day• Exercises
  • 66. Available NWS Services – On-site Support• Incident Meteorologist (IMET) g ( ) – Local Expertise – Able to work independent of local NWS office – Provide weather input to response team• Trained – ICS – HAZMAT Response – Media• Resources – 4X4 response vehicle – Laptop with portable two-way satellite dish – Local weather observation equipment
  • 67. www.weather.gov/seattlewww.weather.gov/spokanewww weather gov/spokanewww.weather.gov/pendletonwww.weather.gov/portland Nationally -www.weather.gov g
  • 68. Spot Forecasts p Your Local NWS Web Site Click the Fire Weather Link- Wildfire- HAZMAT- Search & Rescue
  • 69. Spot Forecasts p
  • 70. Spot Forecasts SAR Spots HAZMAT Spots25 45 4020 35 3015 25 2010 15 105 50 0 SAR Spots HAZMET Spots
  • 71. HYSPLIT(Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model) Single-Particle For Events Larger Than 10 k km
  • 72. Working Together When ‘It’ Happens• Weather Support – Phone, Radio – On-Line – On-Site• Emergency Message Dissemination
  • 73. NWS Warning Government Product Agencies NOAA Port NOAA Weather Wire EMWIN Internet Private Associated Vendors Press ACCESSNWR / EAS Media General Emergency Multiple Public Mgmt Paths
  • 74. NWS is an All-Hazards All-Weather Support Resource In Summary – Working Together When ‘It’ Happens • Site-Specific Weather Support • Phone • Radio • On-Line • On-Site • Emergency Message Dissemination • NOAA Weather Radio • Emergency Alert System (EAS) • Text Message to Newswires/Media • E-Warn, iNWS, NWSChat • Social Media
  • 75. What s What’s New?• Social Impacts of Weather• FLARE• Area Forecast Discussions• Weather Spotters• CoCoRaHS• NWSChat• E-Warn• iNWS• NOAA Weather Radio• HazCollect• A Few More
  • 76. Social Impacts of Weather• What are the impacts of: • High Wind • Floods • Winter Storms • Heat • Landslides and more• Improving decision support for community leaders • High Impact Weather Events (e.g. – Howard Hanson Dam) • Planning in Advance • Public Safety • Protecting / Mitigating Impacts to Property • Maintaining / Enhancing Commerce• Proactive steps • Weather Outlooks / Watches / Warnings / Statements • On-line Weather Briefings On line • Forecast Discussions - 4 times per day • Is there more? Your input desired
  • 77. Virtual Weather Briefings• Virtual and Interactive on-lineweather briefings• Decision Support Services• Audio provided by a toll-free conf p ycall line• Conducted prior to and throughanticipated significant weatherevents• Notification of briefings via email g• Secure control over desktopsharing
  • 78. Fully Localized Atmospheric Research Environment FLARE Desktop Weather Display S t D kt W th Di l System- 5 separate panels - Observational data - Local zone forecasts - Icons - Ticker - Looping images - Warning display- Customize to your needs- Great for Kiosks, EOCs,desktops, etc Available NOW! Application http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/wrh/ssd/flare.msi Documentation http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/wrh/ssd/index-flare.html
  • 79. NWS Seattle to You• NOAA W th R di Weather Radio • 22 stations serving Washington • All H All-Hazards Warning d W i System • Warning Alarm • Emerg Alert System (EAS)• On the Web • weather.gov/seattle/ • Nationwide – weather.gov
  • 80. This is a clickable map that gives you a point forecast www.weather.gov/ seattle Nationwide - Click here for the weather.gov- Zone forecast or the- Forecast Discussion
  • 81. Area Forecast Discussion (AFD)AREA FORECAST DISCUSSIONNATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE SEATTLE WA300 AM PDT THU AUG 14 2008.SYNOPSIS...A STRONG UPPER RIDGE AND LOW LEVEL OFFSHORE FLOW WILL BRING SUNNY WEATHERTHROUGH SATURDAY WITH RECORD OR NEAR RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES UNSTABLE AIR WILL LEAD TO A TEMPERATURES.THREAT OF THUNDERSTORMS SATURDAY. A TRANSITION TO A COOLER REGIME WILL GET UNDERWAY SUNDAY....ASONSHORE FLOW PUSHES COOLER MARINE AIR INLAND BY MONDAY. AN UPPER TROUGH WILL PRODUCE ACHANCE OF SHOWERS BY WEDNESDAY.&&.SHORT TERM...AS EXPECTED A STRONG UPPER RIDGE HAS DEVELOPED ALONG THE WEST COAST OF NORTHAMERICA IN RESPONSE TO A DEEPENING TROUGH OFFSHORE ALONG 150W (image). THE LOW LEVEL FLOW HASTURNED WEAKLY OFFSHORE AS A THERMALLY INDUCED SURFACE TROUGH EXTENDS NORTHWARDFROM NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ALONG THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST COAST. OF COURSE THIS IS THE CLASSICSCENARIO FOR HOT SUMMER WEATHER IN WESTERN WASHINGTON...AND IT WILL PRODUCE GENERALLY SUNNYSKIES AND RECORD OR NEAR RECORD HIGH TEMPERATURES FOR THE NEXT THREE DAYS.THE HOT SPELL WILL REALLY GET UNDERWAY TODAY AS 500 MB HEIGHTS CLIMB ABOVE 590 DAM AND THETHERMAL TROUGH EXTENDS ACROSS VANCOUVER ISLAND (image). WEAK NORTHERLY FLOW WILL KEEPTEMPERATURES FROM REACHING THEIR FULL POTENTIAL OVER MUCH OF WESTERN WASHINGTON...BUT SOMEOF THE RECORD HIGHS FOR TODAY ARE ANOMALOUSLY LOW AND THEY SHOULD BE TIED OR BROKEN. FOREXAMPLE THE RECORD AT SEATAC IS ONLY 88. These are hypertext links to imagesFRIDAY WILL BE WARMER YET AS THE UPPER RIDGE SHIFTS ONLY SLIGHTLY EASTWARD...AND THE SURFACETHERMAL TROUGH REMAINS ANCHORED ALONG THE COAST THE LOWER ATMOSPHERE WILL REALLY WARM UP COAST. that h th t show the weather pattern in the th th tt i thBETWEEN TODAY AND FRIDAY WITH 850 MB TEMPERATURES CLIMBING INTO THE LOW 20S (image). Enhanced AFDSATURDAY SHOULD BE THE WARMEST DAY IN THE SERIES...AT LEAST FOR THE WESTERN WASHINGTON INTERIOR.THE UPPER RIDGE WILL BE TO OUR EAST AND UPPER HEIGHTS WILL FALL SLIGHTLY...BUT THE LOWERATMOSPHERE WILL CONTINUE TO WARM SLIGHTLY AND...MOST IMPORTANT...THE THERMAL TROUGH WILL SHIFT
  • 82. Sample Enhanced AFD Images
  • 83. Spotters are so important!• They help the NWS by reporting on hazardous weather in their area• Their reports lead to better forecast and warning accuracy• Their reports help verify and accompany radar and satellite data• Bottom line: They provide ground truth! “The “Th eyes and ears of the NWS” d f th• Training scheduled year round
  • 84. How are Spotter Reports Used? p p• NWS Warning Program – “Ground Truth” – Reinforce current warning messages – Basis and Verification of weather warnings and advisories d i i• Transmitted to….. – Media (TV, radio, newspapers, Internet) – Local Emergency Management Staff
  • 85. Where Do Spotter Reports Go? p p
  • 86. CoCoRaHSCommunity Collaborative Rain, Hail & Snow network • Volunteers Report Precipitation On-Line. Community and Citizen Involvement! – Rain , Hail , Snow • Daily & Event Driven Reports • Interactive Web site: www.cocorahs.org • Adds Greater Precipitation Report Density Across WA/OR • WANTED: (observer/square mile) • Training
  • 87. CoCoRaHSCommunity Collaborative Rain, Hail & Snow network • Volunteers Report Precipitation On-Line. Community and Citizen Involvement! – Rain , Hail , Snow • Daily & Event Driven Reports • Interactive Web site: www.cocorahs.org • Adds Greater Precipitation Report Density Across WA • WANTED: (observer/square mile) – Currently over 740 • Training
  • 88. NWS Chat• Chat Room• Real-time collaboration with on duty Real time on-duty meteorologists• NWS P NW offices are up and running PacNW ffi d i with NWS Chat• Join us for collaboration https://nwschat.weather.gov
  • 89. NWS Chat• Chat Room • NWS BOT• Multiple Chat Rooms • Hyperlink to any warning product
  • 90. Bonus Feature – NWS BOT• NWS BOT• Hyperlink to any warning product
  • 91. New! NWS Chat Live nwschat.weather.gov/live h t th /li
  • 92. NWS ChatHow do I get started?• Request account for NWSPartners at:https://nwschat.weather.gov/create.php  login (e.g., EM-John.doe)  password• Download and install PidginIM client  http://www pidgin im/ http://www.pidgin.im/ Use pidgin v2.7.11  Also an Internet version• Start Chatting
  • 93. E-Warn• Automatic Email Notification (PC, cell phone, PDA)• Set up for single or multiple counties• Just need your desired email address and type of messages you wish to receive• To Register, contact your Warning Coordination Meteorologist
  • 94. •NWS Mobile is an application th t will run on mobile devices NWS M bil ppli ti that ill m bil d i s•Allows you to browse the following weather data using a mapinterface: •NWS watches warnings, and advisories watches, warnings •Radar and satellite imagery •Observations •Forecasts Forecasts http://inws.wrh.noaa.gov
  • 95. Easy as 1-2-3
  • 96. areacounty zipcode Multiple alert areas, even outside WA
  • 97. Social Media• Facebook – www.facebook.com/US.National.Weather.Service.gov – www.facebook.com/US.NationalWeatherService.Seattle.gov• Twitter Storm Report – http://www.srh.noaa.gov/srh/twitter/twitter.php• YouTube Channel – http://www.youtube.com/usnoaagov• www.noaa.gov/socialmedia
  • 98. NWS Products and Services Guide for Oregon and g Washington• Updated this Winter• On NWS Seattle Web Site• On NWS Portland Web Site• Offers: – NWS Products – NWS Dissemination System – Terminology – And much more!
  • 99. On-Line Weather Educational Slide Sh Slid Shows • Started in 2007 • More being added • Local Topics • Pacific NW Wind Storms • Puget Sound Convergence Zone • Pineapple Express • Heat Waves • Arctic Outbreaks • Lightning Safety • Less Than 15 Min Long • Great for Home, Work, Classroom • weather.gov/seattle • What Topics Do You Want ??
  • 100. The COMET® Program gCOMET founded as a Cooperative Programin 1990 by NOAA NWSA program within the University Corporationfor Atmospheric ResearchIn addition to NOAA, 8 other sponsoring p gorganizationsOffers free computer based distance learning computer-basedvia the MetEd Website, for over 120,000registered users world-wide
  • 101. COMET® ResourcesOffers dozens of education and trainingmodules via the International Multi-Hazards Early Warning Systems siteon MetEd.Designed for NMHS and EmergencyManagement professions, as well as ggovernment decision makers and thegeneral public.Many modules available in both Englishand Spanish. http://www.meted.ucar.edu/hazwarnsys/index.php
  • 102. The COMET® ProgramEducation and Training http://www.meted.ucar.edu/hazwarnsys/index.php
  • 103. NWS Heat Health Watch/Warning System S stem• Seattle Area’s Debuted Summer 2005• Portland’s Debuted Summer of 2006• Heat is a Killer – Even Here! • 1975-1999 – 645 excess deaths in Seattle area • Avg of 27 per year above normal mortality rate g p y y • #1 weather-related killer• System is Tailored for our Climate and Community• Issued during Unseasonable Hot Spells if a Threat to Lives• Education and Awareness Partnership with Area Health d i d hi i h lh Community and Emergency Management Officials
  • 104. NWS Products and Services Your Weather Support Partner Serving America g Since 1870 Helping Protect Lives and Property and Enhancing Our Economy Ted Buehner Warning Coordination MeteorologistNWS Seattle/Tacoma, Wa
  • 105. Questions ??
  • 106. Time to Surf a NWS Web Site !What Do You Want to Cover?- Interpret Radar?- Interpret Satellite?- Spotter Reports?- Digital Forecasts/GIS?- Historical Data?- Others?

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