Public Speaking For Scientists  Key Success Factors to Communicate       Research Data Effectively          Brought to you...
Communicating Data-Rich Results – Key Success Factors       article can be found in Science Pro Insider, Vol. 1 – Issue 2,...
Reader question:I struggle with converting my research resultsand data into interesting discussions at nationalmeetings.Ar...
Expert Comments:By Rick ParmelyMany presenters we hear at national meetings do struggle to providemore than a recitation o...
Introducing Science Pro Insider                        The only Free Monthly eNewsletter                        focused on...
It is necessary at the outset to appreciate abasic principle of all public speaking:   In order to appeal to the mind of a...
So when you begin to build the outline for your next presentation, ask yourself:  • What aspects of my research will touch...
Now, start putting           “meat on the bones”         of your skeleton outline!         Develop a story from history, a...
Finally, don’t forget a powerful conclusion!Often, we as speakers end with one slide containing one word:            Quest...
Ideally, questions will be entertained and answeredthroughout your talk. However, if the meeting formatdoes not allow for ...
Introducing Science Pro Insider                        The only Free Monthly eNewsletter                        focused on...
Now Try It!Develop an outline with a few key points,wrapping the entire presentation in areasonable story or illustration....
Finally, conclude powerfully, tying the manyparts together into a neat, cohesive package.     With these few tips, your ta...
Rick Parmely      Polished and Professional, LLC       www.polishednprofessional.com       rick@polishednprofessional.com ...
Principal Investigators Association offers a free eNewsletter, Science Pro Insider, free bi-weekly e-Alerts, grant applica...
NIH R01 Grant Application Mentor:                                   An Educational How-to Manual                          ...
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Public Speaking For Scientists

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The success of your live presentation doesn't just depend on your public speaking style, but also on how engaging the content being presented is. For scientists, data rich presentations pose a unique challenge because they are often perceived as dull and uninspiring with most of the content focusing strictly on results. The truth is that motivating and engaging a broad audience is difficult to accomplish with just data.

For starters, to make your data rich presentations “come alive” you need to make sure you and your message, and not your PowerPoint slides, take center stage.

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Public Speaking For Scientists

  1. 1. Public Speaking For Scientists Key Success Factors to Communicate Research Data Effectively Brought to you by Principal Investigators AssociationExpert comments provided by Rick Parmely, founder of Polished and Professional LLC. www.principalinvestigators.org Phone: 1-800-303-0129 Email: info@principalinvestigators.org
  2. 2. Communicating Data-Rich Results – Key Success Factors article can be found in Science Pro Insider, Vol. 1 – Issue 2, published by Principal Investigators Association.To subscribe to this free monthly eNewsletter visit http://bit.ly/ScienceProExpert comments inside this article provided by Rick Parmely.Rick Parmely is the founder of Polished and Professional LLC, a training company that specializes inimproving the communication skills of presenters everywhere, from the individual investigator to largegroups of trainers. He can be reached at rick@polishednprofessional.comPolished and Professional provides communications coaching and mentoring on-line as well as on-siteto groups as diverse as Merck & Company, Restek Corporation and associations like the Association ofLaboratory Managers (ALMA) and the Pittsburgh Conference. PnP provides one-on-one coaching toindividuals or to larger groups at a convenient time and location, in an atmosphere conducive tolearning. They also polish written communications and professional oral presentations, readying themfor “prime time,” whether they are targeted for investors, or for local, national, or internationalaudiences and meetings.
  3. 3. Reader question:I struggle with converting my research resultsand data into interesting discussions at nationalmeetings.Are there any tips that can help me to enlivenmy presentations and still keep a focus on themeat of my research – the data?
  4. 4. Expert Comments:By Rick ParmelyMany presenters we hear at national meetings do struggle to providemore than a recitation of facts and data. To a large degree, audienceshave even come to expect that a serious research project will containfacts, figures, plots, and tables, and little else.While presenting your data is essential, audience engagement doesnot have to suffer when revealing results of great research. What can be done?
  5. 5. Introducing Science Pro Insider The only Free Monthly eNewsletter focused on providing best practices on obtaining grant funding, lab management, career advice and much more! SUBSCRIBE TODAY! Visit http://bit.ly/SciencePro Inside November’s Issue: • Communicating Data-Rich Results – Key Success Factors • How to Leverage Connections for Private Funding • R01 or R21? Choose The Appropriate Grant Type • Dealing with the ‘Negative’ Staffer in your Lab
  6. 6. It is necessary at the outset to appreciate abasic principle of all public speaking: In order to appeal to the mind of a listener…. you must first find a way to appeal to the heart. Why? If the heart is not engaged, the mind starts to wander. Once the mind of your listener starts to wander, very little of what you say will be heard or remembered.
  7. 7. So when you begin to build the outline for your next presentation, ask yourself: • What aspects of my research will touch the audience? • What key concepts absolutely must be communicated? • How can I tell the story of where we began this project, who was involved, what has been accomplished by others, and how important the completion of this project is to the science or to people’s lives? • What data must be presented to tell that story? • What can the listener take away from my discussion?Answering these questions will enable you to develop the “skeleton,” theoutline, from which you can then build a powerful talk.
  8. 8. Now, start putting “meat on the bones” of your skeleton outline! Develop a story from history, a recent news item, an observation in nature or another event that illustrates the essence of your talk. Hold your presentation to a few main points and then limit your data to only the essential graphs, charts and tables that support those few key points.Further involve the audience with well-planned questions that cause them to thinkand stay engaged.
  9. 9. Finally, don’t forget a powerful conclusion!Often, we as speakers end with one slide containing one word: Questions?
  10. 10. Ideally, questions will be entertained and answeredthroughout your talk. However, if the meeting formatdoes not allow for that, but you are still seeking to elicitaudience questions and feedback at the end of your talk,does that eliminate the need for an effective conclusion? NO! In this case, the wise presenter still concludes powerfully, either just before the Q and A section or immediately afterward. Why? The last words spoken will stay in the mind of the listener the longest. So make those words your best words!
  11. 11. Introducing Science Pro Insider The only Free Monthly eNewsletter focused on providing best practices on obtaining grant funding, lab management, career advice and much more! SUBSCRIBE TODAY! Visit http://bit.ly/SciencePro Inside November’s Issue: • Communicating Data-Rich Results – Key Success Factors • How to Leverage Connections for Private Funding • R01 or R21? Choose The Appropriate Grant Type • Dealing with the ‘Negative’ Staffer in your Lab
  12. 12. Now Try It!Develop an outline with a few key points,wrapping the entire presentation in areasonable story or illustration.Apply simplicity to your data; avoiddelivering data that is not critical to yourargument or data that lacks clarity.
  13. 13. Finally, conclude powerfully, tying the manyparts together into a neat, cohesive package. With these few tips, your talk will actively engage your audience and your presentation will indeed be a great success!
  14. 14. Rick Parmely Polished and Professional, LLC www.polishednprofessional.com rick@polishednprofessional.com Phone: 814-470-0598 Services:On-site communications training, recording andanalysis of communications and presentations.Call or Email Rick to set up individualized training or invite him to speak at your department and university.
  15. 15. Principal Investigators Association offers a free eNewsletter, Science Pro Insider, free bi-weekly e-Alerts, grant application manuals, executive reports and a year-long series of online seminars — all devoted to helping you improve performance and spend more time doing what you love: the research. Our goal as an organization is to be the world’s leading source of real-world, results-oriented information for our members in all fields of science. Our unique approach — delivering targeted guidance, case studies, success strategies and best practices — has earned us a reputation for depth, usefulness and high-value information as well as a loyal group of members who rely on that information to help them with their administrative and funding duties. We invite you to review all of our products and services at www.principalinvestigators.org.© 2013 Principal Investigators Association. The entire contents of this publication are protected by Copyright, worldwide. All rightsreserved. Principal Investigators Association — as well as this report — is completely independent and not controlled by anygovernment agency, organization or society, consultancy, contractor, or vendor. It is not endorsed by, nor does it have any officialconnection with, the National Institutes of Health or the National Science Foundation. Opinions expressed by private authors aretheir own, and not official government opinions.
  16. 16. NIH R01 Grant Application Mentor: An Educational How-to Manual • 299 Pages – 8 Unique Sections – Covering each important facet of the NIH R01 process • A 50 min. recording “Crafting Your R01 Proposal Like the Pro’s: 10 Insider Tips Revealed” • How-to Advice from veteran grant winners • Insights, techniques and checklists to help you write more effectively and with confidence • BONUS! Includes sample language from funded applications For More InformationAlthough I have served as an NIH grant reviewer formore than 20 years, the R01 Grant Application Mentor http://bit.ly/R01Granthas significantly enhanced my efforts as a reviewer andin the preparation of my own R01 grant this year.- Dr. Joseph C. Hall, Professor Norfolk State University

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